Mini Tribute: Boris Karloff

Born November 23, 1887 Horror Icon Boris Karloff

Boris Karloff appeared in over 200 film and television roles, silent and sound, including Frankenstein, The Mummy, Tower of London, The Body Snatcher, The Black Cat — and of course The Grinch!

Boris Karloff, Frankenstein, The GrinchBoris Karloff as Frankenstein, himself, and The Grinch

“The monster was the best friend I ever had.” -Boris Karloff

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–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

 

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“Tyrone Power: Man, Myth and Movie Idol” Exhibit at The Hollywood Museum – Ticket Giveaway Contest starts Monday

 Win Tickets to see “Tyrone Power: Man, Myth and Movie Idol” at The Hollywood Museum

Do you live near, or expect to be in, the Los Angeles area soon? If the answer is yes, then we have the perfect giveaway contest for you!

We are SO HAPPY to announce that The Hollywood Museum has given us FIVE PAIRS of tickets to give away to CMH fans to see the Museum’s Exclusive Tyrone Power Exhibit in Hollywood.  And, if that’s not enough, the Museum has also created a special $5 OFF Discount Coupon especially for CMH fans!  

That said, we will be giving away FOUR PAIRS of tickets via Twitter and ONE PAIR of tickets via Facebook and this blog. We’ll post our Twitter giveaway instructions on Monday, November 24, and our Facebook/blog giveaway instructions on Wednesday, November 26 — so stay tuned to us on TwitterFacebook and/or right here on this blog so that you can enter.

Tyrone Power Jr at the Tyrone Power Exhibit at the Hollywood MuseumTyrone Power Jr. ‘looking up’ at his father at the Opening Night Exhibit Gala

“Tyrone Power: Man, Myth & Movie Idol” is running from November 14, 2014 through January 11, 2015 at The Hollywood Museum, 1660 Highland Avenue in Hollywood, California. It’s the nation’s largest exhibit of authentic memorabilia honoring Power, and was curated in collaboration with his son, actor Tyrone Power, Jr.  The Exhibit includes never-before-displayed costumes, personal mementos and many more items culled from family, friends, private collectors and The Hollywood Museum archives.

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Tyrone Power Jr., sister Taryn Power and The Hollywood Museum president and founder Donelle DadiganTyrone Power Jr., sister Taryn Power and The Hollywood Museum president and founder Donelle Dadigan

Exhibition Highlights include:

  • Power’s iconic costumes:
    • Matador “suit of lights” from Blood and Sand (1941)
    • Embroidered pants from The Mark of Zorro (1940)
    • Black hat with red feathers from Captain from Castile (1947)
  • Co-star costumes:
    • Maureen O’Hara’s black gown from The Long Gray Line (1955)
    • Gene Tierney’s fur trim jacket and gown worn from That Wonderful Urge (1948)
  • Power’s silk brocade dressing gown
  • Personal mementos and photos
  • Scripts:
    • The Razor’s Edge (1946)
    • Blood and Sand (1941)
  • Lobby cards and posters
  • And much more!

And if you can’t wait to win tickets, click here to print our exclusive $5 off coupon.

Tyrone Power Jr at The Hollywood Museum Tyrone Power Exhibit Opening Gala

About The Hollywood Museum: The Hollywood Museum in the Historic Max Factor Building houses over 10,000 real showbiz treasures and the most extensive collection of Hollywood costumes, star cars, props, posters, photographs and memorabilia in the world showcasing more than 100 years of Hollywood history. Discover the glamour of old Hollywood from Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks to Marilyn Monroe, Joe DiMaggio and Elvis Presley. The Hollywood Museum is also home to Max Factor’s world-famous makeup rooms where Marilyn Monroe became a blonde and Lucille Ball first donned her signature red hair. Visit thehollywoodmuseum.com or follow on Twitter (@HollywoodMuseum).

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–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

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Charlie Chaplin: A Brief Life – Book Giveaway starts Monday and runs through the New Year

“Charlie Chaplin: A Brief Life” by Peter Ackroyd – Book Giveaway!

I am so very happy to announce our latest book giveaway! From Monday, November 24 through January 2, 2015, Classic Movie Hub will be giving away TWELVE copies of Charlie Chaplin: A Brief Life by acclaimed biographer Peter Ackroyd, courtesy of Doubleday books.

As a HUGE Charlie Chaplin fan myself, I couldn’t wait to read this book – and I was not disappointed — at all! This is a marvelous biography that lends great insight into the life, the films, the man — and the genius — of Charles Chaplin.  A pleasure to read!

Charlie Chaplin: A Brief Life by Peter Ackroyd

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So let’s get down to business… We have a total of TWELVE BOOKS to give away — NINE books via Twitter and THREE books via Facebook and this blog. We will post our Twitter giveaway instructions on Monday, November 24, and our Facebook giveaway instructions on Wednesday, November 26 — so stay tuned to us on Twitter, Facebook and/or right here on this blog so that you can enter.

AND — I am happy to say that Continental United States (excluding Alaska, Hawaii, and the territory of Puerto Rico) AND Canadian entrants are eligible to enter. (see contest rules for further information)

BlogHub members ARE also eligible to win if they live within the Continental United States (as noted above) and/or Canada.

And if you can’t wait to win the book, you can purchase it on amazon via the below link (click on image):

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–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

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What a Character Blogathon 2014: Melville Cooper

Yes, Indeed! Melville Cooper is Quite a Character!

Pompous snobs, disdainful servants, cowards, bunglers, confidence men and thieves… yes, that would be Melville Cooper, and he is quite the character!  I can still remember the first time I ‘encountered’ him — as Miss Elizabeth’s hopeful suitor in Pride and Prejudice — with all of his clumsy and clueless attempts to make amends to the family whose fortune he was destined to inherit…

“As you are aware Madame, when a certain melancholy event occurs, I shall be the involuntary means of disinheriting your daughters. I have long felt it my duty to make such reparation as within my power.”  

And what a delivery — with the snobbiest of voices and the most condescending of mannerisms!  But that is just the first of many Melville Cooper performances that I’ve enjoyed throughout the years…

Melville Cooper 1940Melville Cooper 1940

Born in Birmingham, England (1896), Cooper made his acting debut at age 18 in a stage production at Stratford-upon-Avon. His budding career was soon interrupted by World War I during which he served in a Scottish Regiment, was captured by the Germans and held as a prisoner of war for a brief time. After the war, Cooper returned to the British stage, earned good reviews, and made his London stage debut in 1924. He transitioned to films in the early 1930′s, and, after appearing in the popular films, The Private Life of Don Juan (1934) and The Scarlet Pimpernel (1934), he made his way to America, where he appeared on both Broadway and, all told, in over 90 films and television shows (1935 – 1961).

So to pay tribute to the wonderful Melville Cooper, I will share quotes from three of my personal favorite Cooper films…

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Melville Cooper as Mr. Collins in Pride and Prejudice 1940Pride and Prejudice (1940, director Robert Z. Leonard).

The bumbling, and quite pompous, Mr. Collins (Melville Cooper), asks for poor Miss Elizabeth’s (Greer Garson) hand in marriage…

Mr. Collins: But my dear Miss Elizabeth, I think you ought to take into consideration, that in spite of your loveliness and amiable qualifications, you are practically penniless and it is by no means certain that another offer of marriage may ever be made you.
Elizabeth: Well by all means!
Mr. Collins: So I must therefore attribute your refusal of me to your wish of increasing my love by suspense — which is, I’m told, the usual practice of elegant females.

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http://www.classicmoviehub.com/blog/wp-admin/post.php?post=10587&action=edit&message=10The Lady Eve (1941, director Preston Sturges).

Conman sidekick Gerald (Melville Cooper) and card sharp Colonel Harrington (Charles Coburn) prepare to fleece ‘poor’ rich Charles Pike (Henry Fonda) (along with Harrington’s con artist daughter Jean, played by Barbara Stanwyck of course!)… 

Colonel Harrington: I can take this boy with a deck of visiting cards.
Gerald: Just to be on the safe side… High card cuts on the outside, cold hands in the middle.
Colonel Harrington (singing): Cold hands I love…
Gerald: Blue readers on the outside, red nearest the heart.
Colonel Harrington: I could play the whole ship with these…

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The Adventures of Robin Hood, 1938: Melville Cooper, Claude Rains, Basil RathboneThe Adventures of Robin Hood (1938, directors Michael Curtiz and William Keighley).

The cowardly High Sheriff of Nottingham (Melville Cooper) with the treacherous Prince John (Claude Rains) and Sir Guy of Gisbourne (Basil Rathbone) plotting to weed out and arrest Robin Hood (Errol Flynn)… 

High Sheriff of Nottingham: I hope our little golden hook will catch the fish.
Prince John: You hope?
High Sheriff of Nottingham: Oh it will… if he’s here.
Prince John: If he’s not we’ll stick your head upon the target and shoot at that.

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A big Thank You to the fabulous Kellee (@IrishJayhawk66) of Outspoken & Freckled, Paula (@Paula_Guthat) of Paula’s Cinema Club and Aurora (@CitizenScreen) of Once Upon a Screen for hosting this fun What a Character Blogathon event! There are so many more wonderful Classic Bloggers participating in this event so please be sure to check out the other entries.

–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

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British Empire in Film Blogathon: Lawrence of Arabia

British Empire in Film Blogathon

Lawrence of Arabia: Part One –The Creation of Myth

Portrait of T.E LawrenceA portrait of the real Lawrence of Arabia.

We open on a lone motorcycle – the very symbol of freedom, the open road – and escape from the trappings of the civilized world. Enter frame right, an elegant, suited gentleman – the typical symbol of order, tradition, and the privileges of the civilized world. Soon enough our gentleman takes to the lone motorcycle, riding off into the back roads of the English countryside and into the arms of fate. Within moments his speed increases, and his driving, erratic, weaves into traffic with reckless abandon. His beaming smile, however, is wiped off his face as he crashes into a random ditch on a random road. Cue the church bells and the funeral scene, for the great Lawrence of Arabia has died. And just like that, a myth is born.

Davis Lean’s 1962 epic Lawrence of Arabia is one of the great milestones of cinematic history. The epic adventure tells the story of the enigmatic British Intelligence office, T.E Lawrence, and his quest to create a free and unified Arabia devoid of Ottoman influence. Despite the film’s complete lack of romance (and any speaking female characters), it’s slow, deliberate plotlines, and no clear indicator of good and evil, Lawrence of Arabia remains one of the most critically acclaimed films of our time. It would go on to gain ten Academy Award nominations winning seven including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Editing.  What I enjoy most about the film, however, is not simply its sprawling story, or gorgeous cinematography or physiological look into the magnetic egotism that is T.E Lawrence. No, what I enjoy most about the film is both the creation and the destruction of the myth – in this case, the myth of Western Imperialism and thus the British Empire in general.

Lawrence of Arabia, Peter O'Toole, David Lean

Lawrence of Arabia (1962, directed by David Lean)

Lawrence of Arabia is a story told in two parts. The first half of the film creates and even relishes in the myth of western expansionist policies – the need to tame the unknown wilderness, proving man’s ability to overcome any challenge thrown their way and bring order to an uncivilized world. The second half of the film, however, works to deconstruct that notion, demonstrating the fallacies of western egotism in the world of turn-of-the-century global politics. Lean effectively uses every aspect of cinema available to further this notion through the creation of one of cinema’s ultimate symbols of western imperialism – T.E Lawrence. For the first half of Lawrence of Arabia, the audience is enraptured by the mysterious figure of T.E Lawrence. His character is immediately identified as a brilliant, eccentric loner; portrayed as equal parts intelligent, daring, and perhaps even mad. Despite objections from some of his immediate superiors, Lawrence is sent on a mission to the Middle East in hopes of forming a military alliance with Prince Faisal (Alec Guinness), the ruler of Syria, against the Ottoman Turks. Once he makes contact, Lawrence promptly ignores direct orders to leave the area and instead remains with the intention of leading the revolt himself. The storyline itself is modeled after the most common of all great myths – the lone romantic hero, fighting against all odds knowing in his heart that his own genius alone will persevere.

Peter O'Toole

Peter O’Toole as T.E Lawrence.

David Lean’s first act of directorial genius was casting. Although an imposing figure in history, the real T.E Lawrence was an above average looking man of about 5 foot 7 inches. Well-kempt but slight in build, the real Lawrence of Arabia could quite easily be lost in a crowd.  The cinema’s version of Lawrence, however, was decidedly different. Blonde, tall, with piercing blue eyes and a face chiseled from stone, Peter O’ Toole’s almost ungodly beautiful version of Lawrence is simply not of this earth. Although the director could have chosen the verisimilitude of a more ‘real’-looking Lawrence, myth is not based in reality, but rather, the reality history wishes to tell.  Through the sheer will and intellect of his character, O’Toole’s now god-like Lawrence is able to convince a group of volatile and uncooperative “tribe-savages” to join together and cross the Nesfud Desert in order to launch a surprise land attack on the port city of Aqaba. While the city is well defended against sea attacks, the desert acts as such a powerful natural defense that the town doesn’t even bother preparing for a land attack. During this time, the myth of Lawrence as the ultimate western hero is created. In one of the film’s more triumphant scenes, Lean combines two aspects T.E Lawrence’s real journey to demonstrate the character’s iron will and stoic sense of justice.  While Lawrence and his company of Bedouin tribesman travel across the unrelenting desert on route to an oasis, one of Prince Faisal’s tribesman, Gasim, falls off his horse during the night and is left in the desert to fend for himself. After reaching their destination, Lawrence, in all his heroic glory, refuses to leave Gasim behind, heading off into the desert alone to find his fallen comrade. When Lawrence returns, Lean furthers the film romantic notions with his skilled use of 70mm film format.

Peter O'Toole in Lawrence of Arabia, directed by David Lean

Let’s play a game: Where’s Lawrence? Can you spot him?

Because the myth of Lawrence ,and ultimately the myth of western imperialism, is built on the notion of man overcoming the bounds of nature, Lean understood the need to visually convey this to an audience. Thanks to his expert use of the wide-angle lens on the unapologetically cinematic 70mm format, the desert was transformed into an existence beyond simple geography. Bleak and ever expansive, beautiful in its mystery, the desert served as both setting and character, creating the oppressive mood that Lawrence must fight to overcome. In the scene where he returns from his seeming suicidal rescue mission, the camera remains fixed while Lawrence slowly approaches. The rising heat of the desert sands create Technicolor flames of illusion, making Lawrence appear as a mirage in the distance. Eventually, in true hero form, he makes it past the rising heat and emerges from the desert with his fallen comrade. Of course, this feat is later undermined when Lawrence is forced to dispense the ‘kings justice’ on the very man he has saved. After convincing Auda abu Tayi (Anthony Quinn), leader of the Howeitat tribe, to join him on his quest to defeat the Turks, one of Prince Ali’s men murders a Howeitat tribesman due to an ancient blood feud. Rather than have his camp fall into the chaos and disarray of tribal rivalry , Lawrence takes on the task of executing the murderer himself. Although Lawrence is surprised to learn it was Gasim who killed the Howeitat, that does not stop him from dispensing justice and he shoots the man he risked life and limb to save. Although the real life Lawrence was not forced to shoot the same man he rescued, that did not matter to Lean. All that mattered was the myth of the civilized ideal of the western Imperialism, able to separate petty emotions from the bigger picture of an ordered, neat society.

Peter O'Toole as T.E Lawrence shooting Gasim

The stuff that myths are made of.

Of course, as we all know, the attack on Aqaba is a monumental success, completely overpowering the surprised Turkish garrison. And with this, the myth is complete. The brilliant western commander, in complete defiance of his petty, small-minded superiors, was not only able to unite the warring tribes of Arabia, but also to defeat man’s ultimate enemy: the merciless terrain of Mother Nature. One again, the West comes in and saves the day. However, as I mentioned early, Lean’s goal was not simply to create myth but to deconstructed it as well, showing the audience the false realities taught to us by the narrative of history. So, stay tuned, my loyal readers and considerer this an intermission, for the second half of this article – coming soon to ClassicMovieHub near you!

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Thanks to Jeff of The Stalking Moon and Clayton of Phantom Empires for hosting this wonder blogathon event!  Be sure to check more great post at The British Empire in Film blogathon.

Minoo Allen for Classic Movie Hub

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“Hope: Entertainer of the Century” Book Giveaway Twitter Contest (Week of November 17)

Book Giveaway: “Hope: Entertainer of the Century” by Richard Zoglin  — Qualifying Entry Task for this week’s  Twitter Contest

By now, you probably know the drill… so here goes…

In order to qualify for this week’s Hope: Entertainer of the Century Giveaway on Twitter, you must complete the following task by Friday, November 21 at 5PM EST (i.e. any time between now and November 21 at 5PM EST):

Bob Hope: Entertainer of the Century by Richard Zoglin

“On screen, they had the perfect combination of camaraderie and tension.  Crosby was the schemer, Hope the patsy; Crosby the cool customer, Hope the nervous Nellie; Crosby the suave ladies’ man, Hope the overeager wannabe. As performers, they were so in sync with each other that their dialogue often sounded ad-libbed, and you felt you were watching the real Hope and Crosby, not two made-up characters. Off-stage they weren’t close friends, but on a movie screen or on the stage, they brought out the best in each other.”
– Richard Zoglin (Excerpt from Exclusive Interview with Classic Movie Hub, read more here)

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ENTRY TASK (2-parts):

1) Answer the below question via the comment section at the bottom of this blog post 

2) Then TWEET (not DM) the following message:
Just entered to win “Hope: Entertainer of the Century” courtesy of @ClassicMovieHub & @SimonBooks
BY Friday, November 21, 5PM EST

THE QUESTION:
Who is your favorite Bob Hope co-star?

To learn more about the book, read our Exclusive Interview with author Richard Zoglin (click here).

*Here’s my twitter handle @classicmoviehub

If you have any questions, please feel free to DM me on Twitter @classicmoviehub.

For more information about Hope: Entertainer of the Century, you can follow Richard on twitter at @RZoglin or visit his website RichardZoglin.com.

Sorry, but please note that only Continental United States (excluding Alaska, Hawaii, and the territory of Puerto Rico) are eligible to enter. (see contest rules for further information)

Contest Information and Rules.

And if you can’t wait to win the book, you can purchase it here

 

Good Luck!

–Annmarie Gatti from Classic Movie Hub

 

Posted in Uncategorized | 10 Comments

Mini Tribute: Daws Butler and His Many Voices

Born November 16, 1916 Voice Actor Daws Butler!

Daws Butler has over 300 voice acting credits to his name. He voiced the Turtle/Penguin in the Disney film, Mary Poppins — as well as some of the most beloved Hanna-Barbera cartoons, plus a few cereal commercials as well!

That said, here is a Montage Tribute to The Many Voices of Daws Butler. Do you remember all of these fabulous and fun cartoon characters???

The Many Voices of Daws Butler: Classic Movie Hub montage - Snagglepuss, Chilly Willy and Smedley, Quick Draw McGraw and Baba Looey, Yogi Bear, Mr. Jinx and Pixie and Dixie, Peter Potamus, Elroy Jetson, Huckleberry Hound, Augie Doggie, Lippy the Lion, Cap'n Crunch and Quisp

The Many Voices of Daws Butler (clockwise, from top left) – Snagglepuss, Chilly Willy and Smedley, Quick Draw McGraw (as El Kabong) and Baba Looey, Yogi Bear, Huckleberry Hound, Augie Doggie, Lippy the Lion, Quisp, Cap’n Crunch, Elroy Jetson, Peter Potamus, Mr. Jinx and Pixie and Dixie

And just for fun…

Daws Butler with Huckleberry Hound and Yogi Bear plushesDaws Butler with Huckeberry Hound and Yogi Bear :)

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–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

Posted in Cartoons, Mini Tributes, Posts by Annmarie Gatti, Voice Actors | Tagged , , , , , , | 2 Comments

“Hope: Entertainer of the Century” Book Giveaway Twitter Contest (Week of November 11)

Book Giveaway: “Hope: Entertainer of the Century” by Richard Zoglin  — Qualifying Entry Task for this week’s  Twitter Contest

In order to qualify for this week’s Hope: Entertainer of the Century Giveaway on Twitter, you must complete the following task by Saturday, November 15 at 5PM EST (i.e. any time between now and November 15 at 5PM EST):

Bob Hope: Entertainer of the Century by Richard Zoglin

“This beautifully written volume is, at last, the book about Bob Hope. Zoglin covers everything; the early life; the skyrocketing triumphs in every medium; the life-risking – and ego-feeding – patriotism that spanned the globe, bringing laughter (and gorgeous ladies) to our troops in wartime; the wealth; the women; the quirks; the warts; the temper; the cheapness; the touching generosity; the abulous talent; and the genius-managed career.” – Dick Cavett

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ENTRY TASK (2-parts):

1) Answer the below question via the comment section at the bottom of this blog post 

2) Then TWEET (not DM) the following message:
Just entered to win “Hope: Entertainer of the Century” courtesy of @ClassicMovieHub & @SimonBooks
BY Saturday, November 15, 5PM EST

THE QUESTION:
What is your favorite Bob Hope movie?

To learn more about the book, read our Exclusive Interview with author Richard Zoglin (click here).

*Here’s my twitter handle @classicmoviehub

If you have any questions, please feel free to DM me on Twitter @classicmoviehub.

For more information about Hope: Entertainer of the Century, you can follow Richard on twitter at @RZoglin or visit his website RichardZoglin.com.

Sorry, but please note that only Continental United States (excluding Alaska, Hawaii, and the territory of Puerto Rico) are eligible to enter. (see contest rules for further information)

Contest Information and Rules.

And if you can’t wait to win the book, you can purchase it here

 

Good Luck!

–Annmarie Gatti from Classic Movie Hub

 

Posted in Books, Contests & Giveaways, Posts by Annmarie Gatti | Tagged , , | 5 Comments

The Fairy Tale Blogathon: Cinderella (1914)

And they Lived Happily Ever After…

Ah, Cinderella! What little girl didn’t grow up hearing, in some version or other, the classic tale of Cinderella?  As for me, it first came in the form of a dazzling, illustrated oversized storybook (which I remember as if it were only yesterday!) and then, via the classic Disney animated film. And, of course, through the years I’ve seen many other iterations, from The Glass Slipper and the various Rogers and Hammerstein versions, to Ever After and A Cinderella Story — and lots of adaptations and versions in between… However, that said, I had not, up until now, seen one of the earliest film versions of Cinderella, and so that is the subject of my Fairy Tale Blogathon post…

The 1914 version of Cinderella stars “America’s Sweetheart” Mary Pickford (incidentally born in Toronto, Canada) as Cinderella, and her ‘then-husband’ silent screen idol Owen Moore as Prince Charming. The film was directed by James Kirkwood Sr (a favorite of Pickford) and released by Famous Players Film Company (which by the way, over time, morphed into Paramount Pictures).

The plot is essentially faithful to the 1697 Charles Perrault story, “Cendrillon” — complete with Fairy Godmother, glass slipper, pumpkin coach and all — but it does include a few deviations, such as Cinderella giving food to an old hag (who turns out to be her Fairy Godmother), Prince Charming meeting Cinderella in the woods prior to the Ball, a dream sequence with a clock, the inclusion of only one Ball (vs two consecutive Balls), and the Prince purposely going to Cinderella’s house to see if she fits the shoe (after inviting all women to the palace to try it on). For me, however, the ‘odd’ thing about the film is that it starts very abruptly, with no indication of who, what and/or why three women (i.e. step mom and step sisters) would abuse poor Cinderella. As a matter of fact, if I didn’t know any better, I’d think that the first reel of the film was missing. But, that said…

To celebrate Cinderella for this Fairy Tale Blogathon, here is a link to an English translation of the original 1697 Perrault story: “Cendrillon” 

AND a link to the film which you can watch for free on YouTube
(so you can compare the film to the Perrault story for yourself)

PLUS some screen grabs from the film…

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Cinderella 1914, the famous fairy tale in 4 actsCinderella 1914, the Famous Fairy Tale in 4 Acts

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Mary Pickford as Cinderella 1914 with Stepmother Isabel Vernon, and two Step Sisters Georgia Wilson and Lucille CarneyFirst Scene: Mary Pickford as Cinderella with Stepmother Isabel Vernon (right), and two Stepsisters Georgia Wilson and Lucille Carney to the left (honestly, not sure who is who)

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Cinderella 1914, mary pickford as cinderella and inez marcel as the fairy godmotherCinderella offers food to an Old Hag (Inez Marcel)

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inez marcel as the fairy godmother, cinderella 1914The Old Hag morphs into Cinderella’s Fairy Godmother (Inez Marcel)

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cinderella 1914, mary pickford as cinderella and owen moore as prince charming, meeting in the woodsCinderella meets Prince Charming (Owen Moore) in the woods (thanks to a little help from her Fairy Godmother)

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Stepmom and Stepsisters get ready for the Ball (poor Cinderella)Stepmom and Stepsisters getting ready for the Ball (poor Cinderella)

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cinderella 1914, fairy godmother, inez marcel, comes to the rescue, mary pickfordBut luckily her Fairy Godmother comes to the rescue

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cinderella 1914, the magic coachAfter picking a large pumpkin and a few mice… the Magic Coach appears

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cinderella 1914 off to the ball, mary pickfordAnd it’s off to the Ball… Don’t forget to leave by the stroke of midnight!

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cinderella 1914, mary pickford, owen moore, cinderella and prince charming at the ballShe is the belle of the ball and…

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Prince Charming is enamored with Cinderella, Cinderella 1914, mary pickford, owen moorePrince Charming is enamored with her

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cinderella 1914, at the stroke of midnight, cinderella runs, mary pickfordAt the stroke of midnight, Cinderella runs

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cinderella 1914, the shoeAnd her shoe remains behind

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cinderella 1914, dream scene called The Consequences of DisobedianceCinderella runs home in rags and falls asleep… dreaming about ‘the consequences of disobedience’

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cinderella 1914, trying to fit the shoeThe Prince searches for his true love by inviting all the women in the land to come to the Palace and try on the shoe

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All of the women on the list have been tried except for the one known as Cinderella, cinderella 1914The shoe fits no-one… but it’s noted that Cinderella hasn’t come to the Palace to try on the shoe… so the Prince insists “I’ll visit this girl myself”

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Prince Charming remembers Cinderella, Owen Moore, Mary Pickford, Cinderella 1914Prince Charming goes to her home, and upon seeing her, remembers her from the woods… he brings her back to the Palace to try on the shoe…

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and the shoe fits, cinderella 1914, mary pickford, owen mooreAnd, of course, the shoe fits…

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and they lived happily ever after, cinderella 1914And, yes, and they lived happily ever after…

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cinderella 1914, final scene, mary pickford, owen mooreThe End :)

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A Big Thank You to Movies Silently (@MoviesSilently) for hosting this wonderful event! There are so many more wonderful Classic Bloggers participating in this Blogathon so please be sure to check out the other entries.

—Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

Posted in Blogathons, Posts by Annmarie Gatti, Silent Films | Tagged , , | 6 Comments

TCM Kicks Off ‘Fan Favorite’ Segment on November 29th: Four Fans to Share Favorite Films with Us!

Four Very Special TCM Fans to Share Favorite ‘Holiday’ Films with us on TCM, the Saturday after Thanksgiving!

How exciting is this?!?!? On November 29th, TCM will be kicking off a new segment called “Fan Favorites” in which Ben Mankiewicz will be video chatting with four passionate classic movie fans as they each introduce one of their favorite ‘holiday’ films to us.  And, I am very happy to say that all four fans are twitter friends of CMH! That said, I can’t wait to tune in that Saturday night and see my friends on TV… And kudos to TCM for, once again, embracing fans and making the Classic Movie Community very happy!

TCM logo

Here’s the schedule: November 29th, all EST times:

12:30PM: Vincente Minnelli’s “Meet Me in St. Louis” (1944)
with Aurora Bugallo (@CitizenScreen)

2:30PM: Sidney Lanfield’s “The Lemon Drop Kid” (1951)
with Paula Guthat (@Paula_Guthat and @TCM_Party)

4:15PM: Christian Nyby’s “The Thing from Another World” (1951)
with Miguel Rodriguez (@MonsterResort)

6:00PM: George Roy Hill’s “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” (1969)
with Joel Williams (@JoelRWilliams1)

See you on the 29th!

–Annmarie from Classic Movie Hub

 

Posted in Articles, Posts by Annmarie Gatti, TCM | Tagged | Leave a comment