TCM Honors Francis Ford Coppola with Handprint and Footprint Ceremony #TCMFF #TCMFFSP

Francis Ford Coppola Immortalized at Imprint Ceremony…

I was thrilled to be able to cover the Francis Ford Coppola Handprint and Footprint Ceremony at the TCL Chinese Theatre (formerly Grauman’s) on April 29th as part of the 2016 TCM Classic Film Festival. TCM’s Ben Mankiewicz hosted the event honoring the legendary film-maker, which marked the 6th consecutive year that TCM featured an imprint ceremony during the Film Festival (previous honorees were Peter O’Toole in 2011, Kim Novak in 2012, Jane Fonda in 2013, Jerry Lewis in 2014 and Christopher Plummer in 2015).

waiting for Francis Ford Coppola at TCMFF 2016 hand print and footprint ceremony; photo credit: Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub; (c) Classic Movie HubA clean slab of cement awaits Francis Ford Coppola in the forecourt of the legendary TCL Chinese Theatre (formerly Grauman’s Chinese Theater) … (photo: 2016 Classic Movie Hub)

Coppola is no doubt considered a Hollywood icon. With a career spanning over 50 years and five Oscars to his name, he is known for directing such epic classics as The Godfather trilogy and Apocalypse Now (1979). Renowned for his generosity with other filmmakers, he has served as a fierce promoter and mentor to others, championing the work of directors George Lucas, John Milius and Sofia Coppola and actors Al Pacino, Robert DeNiro, Harrison Ford, James Caan and Diane Lane.

Ben Mankiewicz speaks at the TCL Chinese Theatre Francis Ford Coppola Imprint Ceremony at the TCMFF 2016 (photo credit: Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub; (c) 2016 Classic Movie HubBen Mankiewicz hosts the event providing an overview of Coppola’s career  (photo: 2016 Classic Movie Hub)

The event kicked off with Ben Mankiewicz providing an overview of Coppola’s film career and accomplishments, after which he introduced Coppola’s son, director Roman Coppola…

Roman Coppola introduces his father Francis Ford Coppola at the TCL Chinese Theatre Graumans Handprint and Footprint Ceremony 2016 TCMFF; photo credit: Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub (c) 2016 Classic Movie Hub
Roman Coppola introduces his father (photo: 2016 Classic Movie Hub)

Roman Coppola warmly introduced his father, talking about what it was like growing up in his famous family. “We did live a life that was filled with the unknown and adventure…and that’s a great way to live a life so I’m very proud to have that experience.” 

He explained why he felt his father’s work is so distinctive, saying that “every film has its own style which evokes the theme of the film. So with Apocalypse it’s a psychedelic film, with Godfather it’s very classic, with Dracula it’s a gothic style…”

He went on to say that his dad had a love of actors and deep respect for their interpretations, and that, once cast, he ”knows that they are truly the expert now in that role.”

About directing, he added ”My dad always values the importance, when you’re directing a scene, to be right by the camera so that the performer is really performing for you as the director. So that’s a little advice especially now in the days of video monitors when people are far away.”

And, most importantly, Roman talked about a very special lesson learned…. “when you’re making a pasta sauce, unless it has meat, there’s no garlic…” :)

So, now, without any further adieu, Francis Ford Coppola graciously accepts the honor and leaves his handprints and footprints in the forecourt of the world-famous theatre…

Francis Ford Coppola at TCL Chinese Theater Graumans Handprint Ceremony 2016 TCMFF; photo credit: Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub; (c) 2016 Classic Movie Hub
Francis Ford Coppola graciously accepts the honor (photo: 2016 Classic Movie Hub)
francis-ford-coppolo-graumans-handprint-ceremony-2016-classic-movie-hub; photo credit: Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub; (c) 2016 Classic Movie Hub
Handprints (photo: 2016 Classic Movie Hub)

francis-ford-coppola-script-imprint-tcmff-2016-classic-movie-hub-IMG_1796

Coppola signs his name (photo: 2016 Classic Movie Hub)
francis-ford-coppola-script-imprint-tcmff-2016-classic-movie-hub-IMG_1796Handprints complete! (photo: 2016 Classic Movie Hub)
francis-ford-copploa-footprint-graumans-ceremony-2016-classic-movie-hub; photo credit: Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub; (c) 2016 Classic Movie HubNow for the Footprints (photo: 2016 Classic Movie Hub)

Among those in attendance were Coppola’s wife Eleanor, sister Talia Shire, granddaughter Gia, and fellow director Peter Bogdanovich.

Talia-Shire-Francis-Ford-Coppola-Eleanor-Coppola-Roman-Coppola -Gia-Coppola-graumans-ceremony; credit: photo by Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub; (c) 2016 Classic Movie Hub Talia Shire, Francis Ford Coppola, Eleanor Coppola, Roman Coppola and Gia Coppola (photo: 2016 Classic Movie Hub)

francis-ford-coppola-gets-peter-bogdonavich-tcmff-2016-imprint-ceremony-classic-movie-hub-IMG_1825

Coppola brings Peter Bogdanovich out from the crowd for a photo (photo: 2016 Classic Movie Hub)
Francis-Ford-Coppola-Peter-Bogdanovich-graumans-ceremony-2016-classic-movie-hub; photo credit: Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub; (c) 2016 Classic Movie Hub
Coppola with Peter Bogdanovich (photo: 2016 Classic Movie Hub)

peter-bogdonavich-tcmff-2016-coppola-imprint-ceremony-classic-movie-hub-IMG_1830

 Bogdanovich waves to the crowd (photo: 2016 Classic Movie Hub)

And lastly…

Francis Ford Coppola handprints and footprints 2016 TCL Chinese Theater, Graumans Theater; photo credit: Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub (c) 2016 Classic Movie Hub
Francis Ford Coppola Handprint and Footprint in fresh cement (photo: 2016 Classic Movie Hub)

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–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

Posted in Posts by Annmarie Gatti, Turner Classic Movies, Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

TCM Classic Film Festival 2016: The “Pre-Show”

 2016 Turner Classic Movies Film Festival
The “Pre-Show”

On Tuesday, April 27th, at approximately 4:15am (EST) I stepped out of my apartment, wide-eyed and bushy-tailed, and stepped into the backseat of an awaiting taxi. Now, I’m sure you’re wondering not only why I would be awake at such an ungodly hour, but why I should also be so damned excited about it. Well, it just so happens I was starting my journey to the 7th annual Turner Classic Movies Film Festival.  Despite CMH being a prominent presence at the festival for the past four years, this is the first time I have been able to go. Needless to say, I was ecstatic…even at 4:15 in the morning. So, after cab ride, a TSA pat-down, a 2,451 mile plane ride and another cab ride, I arrived in the heart of Hollywood and instantly knew I had reached the mecca of Classic Films.

Pre-show 1Seriously, though. The place had 4-story high monuments to classic film reaching for the sky.

And of course, upon my arrival I immediately got down to business. After dropping off my luggage at the hotel, I made my way to the TCL Chinese 6 Theatres for the TCM Film Festival press conference.  The panel consisted of General Manager Jennifer Dorian, Managing Director Genevieve McGillicuddy, Senior Vice President of Programming Charles Tabesh, and TCM Host Ben Mankiewicz. Unfortunately, Robert Osborne was unable to attend this year’s press conference due to illness.  Although everything from programming to TCM’s new exclusive fan club (TCM Backlot) was discussed, my interested was piqued with the mention of TCM’s upcoming streaming service, FilmStruck.

FilmStuck will be collaborative effort between TCM and the Criterion Collection to bring you a brand-new, subscription streaming service that will allow viewers to sift through both company’s massive film libraries. The service will also feature The Criterion Collection’s archive of supplementary features such as commentary, director interviews, and more. Whether you’re a fan of classic, art-house or international film, FilmStruck will mostly certainly have a film (or 50) that you are sure to love. Available for subscription later this fall, they can count on this gal for a subscription…as long as it’s fairly priced.

Oh, and did I mention I got a picture with Ben Mankiewicz. Because I totally did.

Pre-show 2Annmarie, Benny-Boy, and myself! Can you tell I’ve been up since 2:15 am?

And all of that was just the pre-show – The Festival hadn’t even technically started yet. So, stay tuned dear readers because coming up next I’m going to tell you all about my Red Carpet adventures and the full restoration of one of my favorite romances, Brief Encounters.

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Minoo Allen for Classic Movie Hub

 

 

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Opera: Just as Fun as Swing!

Opera: Just as Fun as Swing!

If you’ve watched enough musicals from the 1930s and 1940s, you’ll find the issue of opera vs. swing popping up quite often. In Judy Garland’s first short film, Every Sunday (1935), MGM paired her with soprano Deanna Durbin in a sort of singing duel. Judy again engaged in a “singing duel” with operatic talent Betty Jaynes in 1939’s Babes in Arms. “I like opera!” Betty trilled, and Judy belted, “I like swing!”. Both girls give a different take on the famed opera “Figaro,” Judy in the hot swing style, Betty in the classical opera one. Later, in MGM’s beloved Andy Hardy series, Mickey Rooney (as Andy) is finally convinced of his classmate, Kathryn Grayson’s, talent when she sings both an operatic aria and a swingin’ modern tune at their high school graduation ceremony. In modern day, when people think of the great Hollywood musical, they think of films with contemporary songs such as Top Hat or Singin’ in the Rain. But what about the operetta? Who can forget Jeanette MacDonald and Nelson Eddy in Maytime or Kathryn Grayson and Howard Keel in Show Boat? The operetta may be a European form of entertainment, but it became part of the American theater and film scene when European immigrants such as Victor Herbert and Sigmund Romberg began to write new operettas in the 1910s through the early 1930s. Operettas are different from opera in that they are shorter and usually center on a light or humorous theme and typically have spoken dialogue. Some of the first composers of operettas began in the 1800s including Offenbach, Johann Strauss, and Gilbert and Sullivan.

Deanna Durbin and Judy Garland in 1935Deanna Durbin and Judy Garland in 1935

Perhaps the greatest champion of the operetta in Hollywood was the legendary Louis B. Mayer, head of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Under his studio’s aegis came the stars Jeanette MacDonald, Nelson Eddy, Kathryn Grayson, Mario Lanza, Howard Keel, and Jane Powell. While we are probably some of George Gershwin’s and Cole Porter’s biggest fans and have watched Gene Kelly and Judy Garland’s films more than we can count, we consider operatic stars and operettas just as valuable to the American film musical. As Deanna Durbin and Judy Garland sing together in Every Sunday, “Dance and make love to the sweet music of Americana!” If we take Judy and Deanna’s sung words (which we do indeed!), opera is just as much a part of Americana as swing.

Below, we have spotlighted three operatic actresses and three operatic actors who we are sure you’ll know!

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The great diva Jeanette MacDonaldThe great diva Jeanette MacDonald

1) Jeanette MacDonald was a star at Paramount before she came to MGM. She starred alongside Maurice Chevalier before pairing with Nelson Eddy from 1935-1942 and becoming MGM’s top diva. L.B. Mayer, who loved the opera, apparently had quite a crush on her and visited the sets of her pictures while he seldom visited the sets of other films being shot. With her spunky personality and vibrant red hair, Jeannette made opera anything but stodgy! She described herself with these words: “I’ve been told I have an Irish temper, I know I have Scottish thrift, and, like the English, I love a good show.”

America's sweetheart, Deanna DurbinAmerica’s sweetheart, Deanna Durbin

2) Deanna Durbin, after being rejected by MGM in favor of Judy Garland in 1935, became Universal Studio’s biggest box office draw. Thanks to Hungarian producer Joe Pasternak, she was placed in vehicles perfectly suited to her talents, perhaps most notably in Three Smart Girls. She mostly played charming and resourceful girl-next-door types who also happened to know how to sing. “I couldn’t go on forever being Little Miss Fixit who burst into song…Just as Hollywood pin-up represents sex to dissatisfied erotics, so I represented the ideal daughter millions of fathers and mothers wished they had,” she said. She retired in 1948 and refused to give interviews for the rest of her life. Despite her extreme privacy, her legacy is still strong and she continues to endear audiences today.

The lovely and underrated Kathryn GraysonThe lovely and underrated Kathryn Grayson

3) Kathryn Grayson is arguably the most unsung of all the opera divas in musical film. Yet, she starred in three of the top grossing films of the 1940s and early 1950s: Thousands Cheer (1943), Anchors Aweigh (1945), and Show Boat (1951). Kathryn, like Deanna Durbin, became a star under the guidance of producer Joe Pasternak. She played common-sensical ingénues who were often trying to break into an opera career. Yet, her best role as the Shrew, Kate, in Kiss Me Kate was a departure from her usual roles, which she lamented were unchallenging and sometimes even “stupid.” She wanted to do intelligent movies with solid stories and music in tandem, but at the time she became a star, the operetta was fading in popularity.  This fact makes her success even more impressive. She was able to become a star against the odds. In 2001, when discussing the state of music and young people, she aptly noted: “You know they took music out of our schools. I’d like to go to Washington and see that they have music appreciation back in our schools because there weren’t gangs, there were no shootings back then. Somehow good music makes everybody happy. It can be very uplifting.”

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Handsome Nelson EddyHandsome Nelson Eddy

1) Nelson Eddy began as an opera singer on the stage before being discovered and making his debut with Jeanette MacDonald in 1935’s Naughty Marietta. He is one of the few operatic movie stars to be considered truly talented by “opera purists” and mainstream audiences alike. Like Jeanette MacDonald, he was a redhead (though his hair photographed as blond), but he did not have quite the feisty onscreen persona as she. Nevertheless, he came across as masculine and handsome, qualities that made him different from the archetypal, rotund and middle-aged male opera singer caricatured by Lauritz Melchior in films like That Midnight Kiss (1949).  Eddy was never impressed with his film career and preferred stage work. When asked why he never watched his own films he declared: “I was too ashamed of them.”

The world's greatest tenor, Mario LanzaThe world’s greatest tenor, Mario Lanza

2) Mario Lanza, often dubbed the World’s Greatest Tenor or The Next Caruso had a short but brilliant career. He came to MGM as an overweight, rough-around-the-edges tenor from Philadelphia. Kathryn Grayson made it her mission to get him into shape so he could be her leading man in 1949’s That Midnight Kiss. Of all her co-stars, she claimed his voice and hers matched best. He became an overnight sensation in That Midnight Kiss and succumbed to “swelled head syndrome.” He became a temperamental and difficult star who was almost impossible to work with. He died in 1959 of heart failure (many believe this was due to the extreme ups and downs of his weight). Even though undependable on the sets of his films, he felt passionately about his work. He stated: “I sing each word as though it were my last on earth.”

Howard Keel, always entertainingHoward Keel, always entertaining

3) Howard Keel, unlike Lanza, was a baritone. The 6’4” actor began as an airplane mechanic before Oscar Hammerstein II discovered Keel during an audition for the stage show, Carousel. He was hired as an understudy for the role of Curly in the stage version of Oklahoma! and soon after made his musical film debut in the highly successful Annie Get Your Gun (1950). He usually played cocky, confident, take charge types who sometimes came off as heels—but likeable heels. Among his most iconic films were those with Kathryn Grayson, Show Boat and Kiss Me Kate. He is also famous for playing the lead in Seven Brides For Seven Brothers. In his memoir, Howard, who always had a zest for life, wrote: “If everything in life always went smoothly, it would be a bloody bore. You know, people say, “Wait and go to heaven”. Well, if heaven’s like they claim it is, I don’t want to go. I’d get bored.”

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Mario Lanza and Kathryn Grayson sing together in "The Toast of New Orleans"Mario Lanza and Kathryn Grayson sing together in “The Toast of New Orleans”

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–Sara and Cynthia Brideson for Classic Movie Hub

Sara and Cynthia Brideson are avid classic movie fans, and twin authors of Ziegfeld and His Follies: A Biography of Broadway’s Greatest Producer and Also Starring: Forty Biographical Essays on the Greatest Character Actors of Hollywood’s Golden Era, 1930-1965. They also are currently working on comprehensive biographies of Gene Kelly and Margaret Sullavan. You can follow them on twitter at @saraandcynthia or like them on Facebook at Cynthia and Sara Brideson.

If you’re interested in learning more about Cynthia’s and Sara’s books, please click through to amazon via the below links:

    

 

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National Classic Movie Day: 5 Movies on an Island Blogathon

If you were stranded on a deserted island and could only watch five movies over and over, what would they be???

When Rick from Classic Film and TV Cafe announced the ’5 Movies on an Island’ Blogathon, I was elated. I thought, ‘what a fun idea and how easy it’ll be to participate! I can rattle off five favorite desert island picks in a heartbeat… yep, absolutely a total slam dunk!’

Well, as you can probably imagine (especially if you are a fellow classic movie fan), as the weeks went on and I continued to think about all of those easy ‘slam dunks,’ my list grew inexplicably larger and larger. So – when I finally sat down to write this blog post, I had over 20 ‘slam dunks’ on my ’5 Movies’ list.  Not exactly what I had anticipated!

Five Movies Blogathon

So, how did I narrow the list down??? Well, it wasn’t easy, and I suspect that, if Rick poses this blogathon question again in a few months, my list may very likely change… but disclaimer aside — although my choices were tough, my criteria was simple:

1) I must be able to watch these movies over and over again without getting bored.

2) The movies must make me smile and/or provide some comfort to me. This means that many of my all-time favorite films did not make the list, simply because they would be too heart-wrenching or emotionally difficult for me to watch alone on a desert island.

3) I must love the dialog and/or music. These are key for me, as words and music resonate very strongly with me (in addition to performance of course).

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So to celebrate the 2nd Annual National Classic Movie Day (May 16th), here are my ’5 Movies on an Island’ movie picks:

pillow talk“Mr. Allen, this may come as a surprise to you, but there are some men who don’t end every sentence with a proposition.” -Doris Day as Jan Morrow in Pillow Talk (to Rock Hudson)

1) Pillow Talk: I’m a huge fan of Doris Day, and in particular, her romantic comedies with Rock Hudson (Pillow Talk, Lover Come Back, Send Me No Flowers) and James Garner (The Thrill of It All). But, since I can only pick one Doris Day ‘rom com’ for this list, it would have to be Pillow Talk (with The Thrill of It All as a close 2nd). Day and Hudson are marvelous in this one, and the dialog is a hoot. And, if that’s not enough, Tony Randall and Thelma Ritter add even more fun to the mix.  Pillow Talk is one of my favorite ‘go to’ movies when I’m stressed or need a quick ‘pick me up’.  It never disappoints me, and always makes me smile. “You are my inspiration, Doris Day” :)

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Sidney Poitier as ark Thackeray, To Sir With Love“You will be adults in a few weeks with all the responsibilities that implies. So from now on you will be treated as such by me, and by each other… as adults, responsible adults.” -Sidney Poitier as Mark Thackeray in To Sir, With Love

2) To Sir, With Love: Okay, so this movie doesn’t make me smile in the traditional sense. And it certainly reduces me to tears every time I see it. So, why did To Sir, With Love make my list when it doesn’t seem to meet my above criteria??? Well, because it is such a powerful ‘feel good’ film. That said, although you will catch me bawling during the final scenes when Sidney Poitier is compelled to make a life-altering decision, the ending is ultimately uplifting and heartwarming – and makes me smile despite my tears. Not to mention the fact that the title song pulls on my heartstrings every time I hear it. So…“Let me give my heart, to sir, with love”…

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my favorite wife“I’d like to get home and tell my wife about this. She thinks all my cases are boring.” -Granville Bates as Judge Walter Bryson in My Favorite Wife (with L-R: Gail Patrick, Cary Grant, Irene Dunne and Randolph Scott)

3) My Favorite Wife: My list just wouldn’t be complete without a Cary Grant film. My only problem was in narrowing down my list of contenders. So, although I adore Arsenic and Old Lace, Bringing Up Baby, Houseboat, Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, and North by Northwest, I had to go with My Favorite Wife. The witty repartee between Cary Grant, Irene Dunne and Randolph Scott just never gets old for me. And, yes, the fact that the movie is about Cary Grant’s wife that returns, after being stuck on a desert island for seven years, has not escaped me :) “Make up your mind old man. You’re not allowed to have two wives, you know”…

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The Gay Divorcee Night and Day Fred and Ginger“Only you beneath the moon and under the sun…” -Fred and Ginger dancing to “Night and Day” in The Gay Divorcee

4) The Gay Divorce: This was another particularly difficult decision for me. I have three all-time favorite Fred and Ginger movies – Follow the Fleet, Top Hat and The Gay Divorcee – not only because of the unparalleled dancing and fabulous supporting cast, but also because of the music itself (can you really beat Irving Berlin and Cole Porter???). It ultimately came down to a decision between Follow the Fleet (I just love the Harriet Hilliard and Randolph Scott dynamic), and The Gay Divorcee (could I resist veteran character actors Eric Blore, Edward Everett Horton and the hilarious Erik Rhodes as co-respondent Rodolfo Tonetti?). The Gay Divorcee won by a smidgen, but I’m good with that choice especially because of the incredible version of “Night and Day” that mesmerizes me every time. And, yes, I always laugh when I hear “Your wife is safe with Tonetti, He prefers spaghetti.” :)

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City Lights“Yes, I can see now.” -Virginia Cherrill as The Blind Girl in City Lights (to Charlie Chaplin)

5) City Lights: All I can say about this, is that I just couldn’t imagine my classic movie life without Charlie Chaplin. And, although I had a hard time deciding between The Gold Rush and City Lights for my Charlie Chaplin pick, City Lights ultimately won out because of its extraordinarily heartwarming ending — as well as its beautiful score. I simply adore the music in this film, from the overture to the heart-wrenching flower girl motifs and hilariously jabbing boxing music. I can listen to the soundtrack for hours on end and never tire of it. And, of course, Chaplin can make you laugh one minute and cry the next – and what’s better than that for your heart… “Tomorrow the birds will sing”…

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PS: Wish I could have added a fun pirate romp to the list like The Black Swan or Captain Blood, but priorities, priorities :)

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A Big Thank You to Rick at Classic Film and TV Cafe (@classic_film) for hosting this wonderful event! There are so many more wonderful Classic Bloggers participating in this Blogathon so please be sure to check out the other entries.

—Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

Posted in Blogathons, Posts by Annmarie Gatti | 16 Comments

Danny Aiello Book Giveaway Facebook/Blog Contest

I Only Know Who I Am When I Am Somebody Else
Danny Aiello Book Giveaway 
via Facebook and this Blog

Okay, now it’s time for the Facebook/Blog version of our I Only Know Who I Am When I Am Somebody Else: My Life on the Street, On the Stage, and in the Movies by actor Danny Aiello Giveaway contest! This time we’ll be giving away TWO copies of the book courtesy of Gallery Books. And, remember, we’re also giving away FOUR MORE copies via Twitter this month as well, so please feel free to enter that contest too…

In order to qualify to win one of these prizes via this Facebook/Blog contest giveaway, you must complete the below entry task by Saturday, May 28 at 10PM ESTWe will pick two winners via a random drawing and announce them on Facebook and here on this Blog the day after the contest ends (Sunday May 29).

If you’re also on Twitter, please feel free to visit us at @ClassicMovieHub for additional giveaways — because we’ll be giving away FOUR MORE books there as well! (Click here for details.)

danny_aiello_250_cover

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ENTRY TASK to be completed by Saturday, May 28 at 1oPM EST…

1) Answer the below question via the comment section at the bottom of this blog post

THE QUESTION:
What is one of your favorite Danny Aiello movies and why? 

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About the Book: In a raw and real chronicle of his gritty urban past, Danny Aiello looks back with appreciation, amusement, and frank disbelief at his unconventional road to success. He offers candid observations on working with luminary directors Francis Ford Coppola, Woody Allen, and Robert Altman, among others, and a vast roster of actors, including Robert De Niro, Paul Newman, Madonna, Cher, and Lauren Bacall. He opens up about friends he loved, friends he lost, and the professional relationships that weren’t meant to be. Above all, Danny Aiello imparts a life lesson straight out of his own experience to anyone who’s ever felt like an outsider: It’s never too late to become who you want to be, to find happiness and fulfillment, and to embrace the winding road to get there.

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Click here for the full contest rules. 

Please note that only Continental United States (excluding Alaska, Hawaii, and the territory of Puerto Rico) entrants are eligible.

And — BlogHub members ARE eligible to win if they live within the Continental United States (as noted above).

Good Luck!

And if you can’t wait to win the book, you can purchase it on amazon via the below link (click on image):

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–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

Posted in Uncategorized | 6 Comments

Danny Aiello Book Giveaway (via Twitter in May)

I Only Know Who I Am When I Am Somebody Else
Danny Aiello Book Giveaway 
via Twitter

Let’s try this again!  It seems that there was something wrong with the comment section on the first blog post announcement…

It’s time for our next book giveaway. CMH will be giving away FOUR copies of I Only Know Who I Am When I Am Somebody Else: My Life on the Street, On the Stage, and in the Movies by actor Danny Aiello, courtesy of Gallery Books, via TWITTER from May 2 through May 28. (plus TWO more copies via Facebook and this Blog, details to follow on Wednesday).

In order to qualify to win one of these prizes via this contest giveaway, you must complete the below entry task by Saturday, May 28 at 10PM EST. However, the sooner you enter, the better chance you have of winning, because we will pick a winner on four different days within the contest period, via random drawings, as listed below… So if you don’t win the first week that you enter, you will still be eligible to win during the following weeks until the contest is over.

  • May 7: One Winner
  • May 14: One Winner
  • May 21: One Winner
  • May 28: One Winner

 

We will announce each week’s winner on Twitter @ClassicMovieHub, the day after each winner is picked at 10PM EST — for example, we will announce our first week’s winner on Sunday May 8 at 10PM EST on Twitter.

If you’re also on Facebook, please feel free to visit us at Classic Movie Hub on Facebook for additional giveaways (or check back on this Blog in a few days) — because we’ll be giving away TWO MORE copies via Facebook/Blog as well!

danny_aiello_250_cover

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ENTRY TASK (2-parts) to be completed by Saturday, May 28 at 1oPM EST — BUT remember, the sooner you enter, the more chances you have to win…

1) Answer the below question via the comment section at the bottom of this blog post

THE QUESTION:
What is one of your favorite Danny Aiello movies and why? 

2) Then TWEET (not DM) the following message*:
Just entered to win the Danny Aiello #BookGiveaway courtesy of @GalleryBooks and @ClassicMovieHub

*If you do not have a Twitter account, you can still enter the contest by simply answering the above question via the comment section at the bottom of this blog — BUT PLEASE ENSURE THAT YOU ADD THIS VERBIAGE TO YOUR ANSWER: I do not have a Twitter account, so I am posting here to enter but cannot tweet the message.

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About the Book: In a raw and real chronicle of his gritty urban past, Danny Aiello looks back with appreciation, amusement, and frank disbelief at his unconventional road to success. He offers candid observations on working with luminary directors Francis Ford Coppola, Woody Allen, and Robert Altman, among others, and a vast roster of actors, including Robert De Niro, Paul Newman, Madonna, Cher, and Lauren Bacall. He opens up about friends he loved, friends he lost, and the professional relationships that weren’t meant to be. Above all, Danny Aiello imparts a life lesson straight out of his own experience to anyone who’s ever felt like an outsider: It’s never too late to become who you want to be, to find happiness and fulfillment, and to embrace the winding road to get there.

…..

Click here for the full contest rules. 

Please note that only Continental United States (excluding Alaska, Hawaii, and the territory of Puerto Rico) entrants are eligible.

And — BlogHub members ARE eligible to win if they live within the Continental United States (as noted above).

Good Luck!

And if you can’t wait to win the book, you can purchase it on amazon via the below link (click on image):

…..

–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

Posted in Uncategorized | 9 Comments

Max Fleischer Universe: Betty Boop’s “Little Pal”

 

Max Fleischer Universe: Betty Boop’s “Little Pal”
(1934, d. Dave Fleischer)

I am here to sing the praises of Max Fleischer’s September 1934 animation gem “Betty Boop’s Little Pal”, which introduced the character of Pudgy the Pup. Pudgy, like Betty, was a possessor of a huge head and saucer-like eyes, and was also one of the most adorable canine creatures in all of cartoon-land, making multiple appearances in many subsequent Boops. 1934 was the year, and July the month, that the Hays Code of moral guidelines in cinema (spurred on by the Catholic Legion of Decency) really came into effect, and a clampdown began on Betty Boop’s racy adult persona, beginning here with the introduction of her family-friendly little pet dog Pudgy (in earlier Boops, Betty actually dated a dog, Bimbo.) Happy to say that not all has been toned down here in the saucy characteristics department, insofar as, in “Little Pal,” Betty is still sporting her garter belt and decolletage.

original poster art for "Betty Boop's Little Pal" (1934)Original Poster Art for “Betty Boop’s Little Pal” (1934)

When the cartoon starts, the pair are picnicking in the park and Betty sings the classic “Little Pal” song which was written, like so many of the best Max Fleischer songs, by the great and relatively unsung composer Sammy Timberg (Max’s brother Lou Fleischer, the head of the Fleischer Brothers Music Department, also had a hand in the writing). Pudgy becomes possessed with all the treats and varieties of food spread out before them on the picnic blanket, and goes to town devouring them all and generally making a mess. Betty gets cross and spanks him and sends him on his way home, where, while sulking miserably on the road, he is picked up by the town dog-catcher. Pudgy and all the rest of the cute impounded dogs in the truck use all their wiles to escape the clutches of the evil factotum, and all’s well that ends well when Betty serenades a sadder but wiser Pudgy at the end with a refrain of this delightful song, which I have rendered here on solo acoustic guitar: soundcloud.com/garylucas/little-pal-gary-lucas-solo

Betty Boop's Little Pal (1934)

Direction, per usual, is by Max Flesicher’s brother Dave, chief tummler, shpritzer and gag-writer of Fleischer Studios, and the animation is done by head Fleischer Studio animator and creator of Pudgy, Myron Waldman, Edward Noland and Lillian Friedman. Special commendation must be paid to the beautifully detailed pastoral backgrounds, and also to Pudgy’s exceedingly lifelike movements — whether it be Pudgy licking Betty’s face at the end or galloping full throttle with the other dogs away from the villainous dog-catcher (whose few muttered words seem to have been voiced to these ears by Billy “Popeye” Costello). Pudgy’s movements are so very realistic in this cartoon that one wonders if Dave was using Max’s patented Rotoscoping process vis a vs tracing over footage of an actual small dog cavorting, to achieve such a naturalistic articulation of the little pup’s persona. As a dog lover myself (and possessor of a small miniature schnauzer named Lulu) I can tell you that the supercute Pudgy strikes a real resonance with me, and with audiences everywhere.

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– Gary Lucas for Classic Movie Hub

Dubbed “one of the best and most original guitarists in America” (Rolling Stone), Gary Lucas is a Grammy-nominated songwriter and composer, and an international recording artist with over 25 solo albums to date. As a fan of classic cinema, Gary tours extensively, playing live accompaniments to legendary horror films including Dracula, Frankenstein, and Vampyr among others. He has also recently released two classic-related albums: “Gary Lucas’ FLEISCHEREI: Music from Max Fleischer Cartoons” featuring 2015 Tony nominee Sarah Stiles as Betty Boop, and “Cinefantastique,” a collection of themes and incidental music from classic films, ranging from South Pacific to Psycho! You can learn more about Gary at GaryLucas.com or by following him on twitter @lucasgary.

 

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Danny Aiello Book Giveaway (via Twitter in May)

I Only Know Who I Am When I Am Somebody Else
Danny Aiello Book Giveaway 
via Twitter

It’s time for our next book giveaway. CMH will be giving away FOUR copies of I Only Know Who I Am When I Am Somebody Else: My Life on the Street, On the Stage, and in the Movies by actor Danny Aiello, courtesy of Gallery Books, via TWITTER from May 2 through May 28. (plus TWO more copies via Facebook and this Blog, details to follow on Wednesday).

In order to qualify to win one of these prizes via this contest giveaway, you must complete the below entry task by Saturday, May 28 at 10PM EST. However, the sooner you enter, the better chance you have of winning, because we will pick a winner on four different days within the contest period, via random drawings, as listed below… So if you don’t win the first week that you enter, you will still be eligible to win during the following weeks until the contest is over.

  • May 7: One Winner
  • May 14: One Winner
  • May 21: One Winner
  • May 28: One Winner

 

We will announce each week’s winner on Twitter @ClassicMovieHub, the day after each winner is picked at 10PM EST — for example, we will announce our first week’s winner on Sunday May 8 at 10PM EST on Twitter.

If you’re also on Facebook, please feel free to visit us at Classic Movie Hub on Facebook for additional giveaways (or check back on this Blog in a few days) — because we’ll be giving away TWO MORE copies via Facebook/Blog as well!

danny_aiello_250_cover

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ENTRY TASK (2-parts) to be completed by Saturday, May 28 at 1oPM EST — BUT remember, the sooner you enter, the more chances you have to win…

1) Answer the below question via the comment section at the bottom of this blog post

THE QUESTION:
What is one of your favorite Danny Aiello movies and why? 

2) Then TWEET (not DM) the following message*:
Just entered to win the Danny Aiello #BookGiveaway courtesy of @GalleryBooks and @ClassicMovieHub

*If you do not have a Twitter account, you can still enter the contest by simply answering the above question via the comment section at the bottom of this blog — BUT PLEASE ENSURE THAT YOU ADD THIS VERBIAGE TO YOUR ANSWER: I do not have a Twitter account, so I am posting here to enter but cannot tweet the message.

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About the Book: In a raw and real chronicle of his gritty urban past, Danny Aiello looks back with appreciation, amusement, and frank disbelief at his unconventional road to success. He offers candid observations on working with luminary directors Francis Ford Coppola, Woody Allen, and Robert Altman, among others, and a vast roster of actors, including Robert De Niro, Paul Newman, Madonna, Cher, and Lauren Bacall. He opens up about friends he loved, friends he lost, and the professional relationships that weren’t meant to be. Above all, Danny Aiello imparts a life lesson straight out of his own experience to anyone who’s ever felt like an outsider: It’s never too late to become who you want to be, to find happiness and fulfillment, and to embrace the winding road to get there.

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Click here for the full contest rules. 

Please note that only Continental United States (excluding Alaska, Hawaii, and the territory of Puerto Rico) entrants are eligible.

And — BlogHub members ARE eligible to win if they live within the Continental United States (as noted above).

Good Luck!

And if you can’t wait to win the book, you can purchase it on amazon via the below link (click on image):

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–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

Posted in Books, Contests & Giveaways, Posts by Annmarie Gatti | Tagged | 1 Comment

TCM Classic Film Festival Day Four Films: CineGIFs #TCMFF #TCMFFSP #MovingPictures

Day Four: TCM Classic Film Festival GIFs

Some more GIFs from the featured films on the last day of TCM’s Classic Film Festival, 2016!

Enjoy!

The Kid (1921)

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Horse Feathers (1932)

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She Wore a Yellow Ribbon (1949)

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The Band Wagon (1953)

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Cinema Paradiso (1988)

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Other films shown today, closing day, at the Festival include:

King of Kings (1961)

All That Heaven Allows (1955)

The Fallen Idol (1948)

Old Yeller (1951)

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Until Next Year!

– Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

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TCM Classic Film Festival Day Three Films: CineGIFs #TCMFF #TCMFFSP #MovingPictures Part Two

Day Three, Part II: TCM Classic Film Festival GIFs

Some more great GIFs from today’s films…..

Enjoy!

Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943)

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The King and I (1956)

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Band of Outsiders (1964)

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Other films shown today at the Festival include:

Midnight (1939)

The War of the Worlds (1953)

Buona Sera, Mrs. Campbell (1968)

Ace in the Hole (1951)

A Face in the Crowd (1957)

The Song of Bernadette (1943)

The Yearling (1946)

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Until Tomorrow…

– Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

Posted in Film Festivals, Gifs, Posts by Annmarie Gatti, TCM | Leave a comment