Book Giveaway: “Harold Lloyd: Magic in a Pair of Horn-Rimmed Glasses” (Twitter Contest Week of February 1)

Harold Lloyd Biography Giveaway!
Entry Task for this week’s Twitter Contest.

Time for our fabulous February Classic Movie Book Giveaway, courtesy of Bear Manor Media! To kick things off, we’ll be giving away a copy of  Harold Lloyd: Magic in a Pair of Horn-Rimmed Glasses this week — the first of our four Classic Book Giveaways this month via Twitter (click here to see the other books we’ll be giving away this month)…

In order to qualify to win a copy of  the book, you must complete the following task by Saturday, February 7 at 7PM EST (i.e. any time between now and February 7 at 7PM EST). The winner will be selected via random drawing and announced via Twitter on Sunday February 8 around 7PM EST.

Harold Lloyd Biography

 

ENTRY TASK (2-parts) to be completed by Saturday, February, 7PM EST:

1) Answer the below question via the comment section at the bottom of this blog post 

2) Then TWEET (not DM) the following message:
Just entered to win “Harold Lloyd: Magic in a Pair of Horn-Rimmed Glasses” courtesy of @ClassicMovieHub and @BearManorMedia #BookGiveaway

THE QUESTION:
What is your favorite Harold Lloyd movie — (or if you haven’t seen one yet) what Harold Lloyd film would you like to see first?

And if you can’t wait to win, you can use our EXCLUSIVE 30% DISCOUNT COUPON CODE CMH30A and buy them at Bear Manor Media via the below link (click image):

Bear Manor Media Exclusive Coupon Code for Classic Movie Hub Fans

Please note that only Continental United States residents (excluding Alaska, Hawaii, and the territory of Puerto Rico) are eligible to enter this giveaway contest. (see contest rules for further information)

BlogHub members ARE also eligible to win if they live within the Continental United States (as noted above).

If you have any questions, please feel free to DM me on Twitter @classicmoviehub.

…..

–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

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Classic Movie Coincidence: Clark Gable and John Ford

Clark Gable and John Ford share a birthday and a film:

Clark Gable starred in Mogambo which was directed by John Ford. Both Gable and Ford were born February 1, seven years apart!

Clark Gable and John Ford on the set of MogamboClark Gable and John Ford on the set of Mogambo

Clark Gable was born William Clark Gable on in Cadiz, Ohio, and John Ford was born John Martin Feeney on in Cape Elizabeth, Maine.

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–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

 

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Announcing February’s Classic Movie Book Giveaway: Harold Lloyd, Francis X. Bushman and More!

February is yet another exciting “Classic Movie Book Month” here on Classic Movie Hub!

For many of us, it’s cold outside! So, why not ‘warm up’ a little by sitting back, relaxing and reading a wonderful classic movie book! And, of course that wouldn’t be such a bad idea either if you happen to live in a warm and sunny place too! That said, Classic Movie Hub is happy to announce this month’s Classic Movie Book Giveaway courtesy of Bear Manor Media! And that’s not all! CMH is also thrilled to say that Bear Manor has created an EXCLUSIVE 30% off DISCOUNT COUPON CODE for their huge selection of books (and more) JUST for CMH FANs!

Okay, here’s all the info…  In a nutshell, we’ll be giving away four books via twitter (one book every Saturday in February as noted below) plus two books via Facebook and this blog (as noted below). Winners will be picked via random drawings. 

Classic Movie Book Giveaway Bear Manor Media

Twitter Contest:
February 7: Harold Lloyd: Magic in a Pair of Horn-Rimmed Glasses (one book)
February 14: The Prints of Classic Hollywood (one book)
February 21: King of the Movies: Francis X. Bushman (one book)
February 28: The Prints of Classic Hollywood (one book)

Facebook / Blog Contest:
February 14: Harold Lloyd: Magic in a Pair of Horn-Rimmed Glasses (one book)
February 28: King of the Movies: Francis X. Bushman (one book)

Follow us on Twitter or Facebook - or check back on this blog weekly – to see the official contest announcements and find out how you can enter to win one of the DVDs. 

And if you can’t wait to win a dvd, you can use your 30% DISCOUNT COUPON CODE CMH30A and buy them at Bear Manor Media via the below link (click image):

Bear Manor Media Exclusive Coupon Code for Classic Movie Hub Fans

Click here for the full contest rules and details. 

Please note that only Continental United States (excluding Alaska, Hawaii, and the territory of Puerto Rico) entrants are eligible.

And — BlogHub members ARE eligible to win if they live within the Continental United States (as noted above).

 …..

–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

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Lawrence of Arabia: Part Two – The Destruction of Myth

Lawrence of Arabia: Part two – The Destruction of Myth

Hello dear readers and thank you for coming back to my Lawrence of Arabia blog posts. Last November, as part of the British Empire Blogathon, I wrote Part One of this two-part series. If you did not get a chance to read it and feel the need to catch-up, I have conveniently provided the link for you right here:

Lawrence of Arabia: Part One – The Creation of Myth

But if you’re a true child of the internet and want the TL;DR version (aka the ‘too long, didn’t read’ version), here is what I had to say: I offered the notion that Lawrence of Arabia is a story told in two parts. The first part, everything before the intermission, is the creation of the great myth of the Western Imperial Liberator. This month I am finishing up my thoughts on the film, delving deeper into how part two of the film takes that notion and flips it on its head – effectively deconstructing that notion and showing the dangers and foils of those false realities. And with that, I begin.

Peter O'Toole charging the Turks, Lawrence of Arabia, David Lean, 1962Lawrence’s flowing white robes – a symbol of his myth

When the intermission ends and part two of David Lean’s sweeping epic begins, we are introduced to the character of American newspaper man, Jackson Bentley who is on the search for the great Lawrence of Arabia. But before he is able to find Lawrence, Bentley speaks with one of the Lawrence’s best allies, Prince Faisal, the political leader of the Arab Revolt. Bentley states very plainly what he is looking for: a romantic figure with the charisma and narrative to urge the neutral United States into the Great World War. In other words he is searching for a myth he can publish – that proper western gentlemen who, despite his wartime duties, remains civil and elegant even in “savage territory.” Prince Faisal states with the cynical tongue of a trained politician that. if what want is a romantic hero to lead your country into war, “then Lawrence is your man.”

When Bentley finally catches up with Lawrence and his Arabian Army in the middle of the desert, he learns first hands what makes this man his ‘romantic figure.’ Despite the Arabian Army’s guerilla warfare tactics, such as blowing up Turkish trains then inundating them with gunfire from strategically well-hidden sand dunes, Lawrence does not kill without reason or without mercy. Although he is surrounded by “savagery and looting,” Lawrence remains the ever-calm, ever-dignified Western leader.  Even after a wounded Turkish solider shoots Lawrence in the shoulder from behind, Lawrence will not kill the man. In a daring move, Lawrence does not even hide from the gunfire, standing directly in the shooter’s line of fire, almost daring the scared solider to try and kill him. You see, at this point in the film, Lawrence IS myth, both in his own eyes and in the eyes of his men. What is a mere bullet to the man who united the Arab world against the Turkish Empire? It was not even Lawrence that killed the wounded solider, but Auda abu Tayi (Anthony Quinn) who put an end to the Turkish man’s life – allowing his Arabian allies to do the dirty work for him.

The rest of the scene plays out like a pure visualization of the white man burden and the cult of personality. Bentley asks Lawrence for a picture, telling him to just walk. And so he does, he just walks. And as he walks, the army of Arabs shout in unison “Lawrence, Lawrence, Lawrence, Lawrence,” and he jumps atop the derailed trains, standing there above his men, arms stretched like their own personal messiah. His flowing white robes make Lawrence seem like a god basking in the heat of the desert sun.

Peter O'Toole, Lawrence of Arabia, David Lean, 1962Peter O’Toole  in Lawrence of Arabia (1962, directed by David Lean)

At this point in the film, the myth is made and no one believes it more than Lawrence. When asked if he was hurt from the bullet wound he says, “Not hurt at all. Didn’t you know? They can only kill me with a golden bullet.” Despite his smile and jesting tone, it’s clear that he believes the hyperbolic language used to describe his exploits. If anything, his next conversation with Bentley demonstrates just how much he believes in his own myth. When asked by Bentley: What are the Arabs fighting for, Lawrence answers: “Freedom…They’re going to get it Mr. Bentley. I’m going to give it to them.” This line, above all else, demonstrates his belief in his own mythologized self and, thus, the myth of western imperialism.  However, Lean also allows the audience a glimpse into the reality of the situation, remarkably different from Lawrence’s grasp on the situation. Lawrence’s army was not, in fact, his army. They joined the guerilla campaign to loot the Turkish trains for all the riches their camels could carry and promptly return to their homes. Because of this, the northern Arab Army was losing numbers so rapidly that even the men who “stayed on for Lawrence” begin to doubt Lawrence’s ability and even his loyalty to the Arab cause. Despite, or perhaps even because of such opposition, Lawrence still believed that, with his will power and his intellect alone, he would be able to give an entire people their freedom. He believes in his myth so much that he bets his Arab men that he can enter an Arab town and “blend in with the natives” despite his white skins blonde hair and blue eyes. And this is where the myth falls apart.

In order to show those in the Arab Army who question his sincerity to the Free Arabia cause, Lawrence goes as a scout into the Darra with Ali. Despite Ali’s multiple warnings to lay low and not draw attention to himself, Lawrence flamboyantly walks around the city as if to make his presence know. He swaggers on the streets as if he owns them, parading himself around like he hadn’t a care in the world. That is, until the great Lawrence of Arabia and Ali are taken in to the Turkish authorities. Due to his inability to humble himself, even in the face of a Turkish Captain, he is not only stripped, poked, and prodded but eventually severely flogged and perhaps even raped, as the film quietly implies. And when the Turks are done with him, they throw him out into the dirty streets as if he is no more than mere trash. And with this, the myth is broken – both in the eyes of the viewer and even Lawrence himself. After this, he is an entirely changed man. Now humbled and brought back to humanity, he attempts to leave the desert  – his great mythological conquest – behind for a simple ordinary life as a simple ordinary man.

Peter O'Toole after flogging, Lawrence of Arabia, David Lean, 1962The stuff that deconstructed myths are made of.

Of course, Lawrence’s conquest wasn’t simply his own, despite what he wished to believe, but served a major purpose for British Empire as well. So, rather then allowing Lawrence to remain in England, General Allenby (Lawrence’s commander) manipulates the emotionally distraught solider back into the fight by feeding Lawrence’s ego – saying it is his destiny to reach greatness.  Lean uses the entirety of this conversation to play on this notion of myth building, but clearly the man meant to represent this has been broken both mentality and emotionally under the weight of that said myth. He cannot become that great symbol of Western Imperialism because it just that – a myth. However untruthful as this myth may be, Lawrence is hooked and heads back to the desert.

However, once in the desert we still see the further cracks in Lawrence’s mythological armor. The men he recruits are not the Arabian freedom fighters he once led, but rather ruthless mercenaries motivated by their pocketbooks. And when they happen upon a column of retreating Turkish soldiers who have just slaughtered an Arabian village, Lawrence’s final dissent out of the mythical world of dignified Western Imperialism and into the realities of war begins. A lone solider from the destroyed village demands, “No prisoners” then charges the Turks and is killed. Rather go around the army and head to their intended goal of Damascus, as Ali suggests, Lawrence sees red. The once mild-manner but genius Major of the British Empire yells “No Prisoners” and heads the charge. The result is nothing short of a massacre with Lawrence’s men easily defeating the already wounded Turkish army. But more disturbing was Lawrence’s sheer glee in the act, clearly relishing in the senseless killing of his perceived enemy. The moral high ground he once gracefully occupied is nothing but a relic of the past – just like the myth of Western Imperialism. The brutality used by Lawrence when all of his false notions of “giving Arabs their freedom” is the brutality that was there since the start. Each bullet Lawrence lodges into the wounded body of an already defeated enemy is another bullet in the myth of the dignified, glorious Lawrence of Arabia and Western Imperialism as a whole.

Peter O'Toole after massacre, Lawrence of Arabia, David Lean, 1962His flowing white robes marred with the blood of his enemy and symbolizing the end of great myth of Western imperialism.

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Minoo Allen for Classic Movie Hub

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Cary Grant DVD Giveaway: Houseboat (Twitter Contest Week of January 26)

Cary Grant “Houseboat” DVD Giveaway!
Entry Task for this week’s Twitter Contest.

Okay, this is it – our forth and final Cary Grant DVD Giveaway on Twitter this month! This week CMH is giving away a copy of the romantic comedy, “Houseboat,” starring Cary and the beautiful Cinzia, oops I mean Sophia Loren (click here to see what else we gave away this month)…

In order to qualify to win a copy of  ”Houseboat” on DVD, you must complete the following task by Saturday, January 31 at 7PM EST (i.e. any time between now and January 31 at 7PM EST). The winner will be selected via random drawing and announced via Twitter on Sunday February 1 around 7PM EST.

cary grant and sophia loren in houseboatCary Grant and Sophia Loren

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ENTRY TASK (2-parts) to be completed by Saturday, January 31, 7PM EST:

1) Answer the below question via the comment section at the bottom of this blog post 

2) Then TWEET (not DM) the following message:
Just entered to win “Houseboat” on DVD courtesy of @ClassicMovieHub #CaryGrant #DVDGiveaway

THE QUESTION:
What is your favorite Cary Grant film and why?  
(I know, I know, it would be a tough choice for any of us!)

AND — I am happy to say that Continental United States (excluding Alaska, Hawaii, and the territory of Puerto Rico) AND Canadian entrants are eligible to enter. (see contest rules for further information)

BlogHub members ARE also eligible to win if they live within the Continental United States (as noted above) and/or Canada.

If you have any questions, please feel free to DM me on Twitter @classicmoviehub.

And if you can’t wait to win the DVD, you can purchase it on amazon via the below link (click on image):

Good Luck!


…..

–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

 

Posted in Contests & Giveaways, Posts by Annmarie Gatti | Tagged | 23 Comments

Chariot Races and Copyright Infringement: A Tale of Ben Hur (Remakes and the Early Days of Film, 4)

 

Chariot Races and Copyright Infringement: A Tale of Ben Hur

In 1907, the state of the American film industry was rather poor and was still, largely, in its infancy. D.W. Griffith had just joined the industry as an actor, but he wouldn’t make his directorial debut until 1908. The Essanay company had just gotten its start and Mary Pickford wouldn’t make her film debut until 1909. The length of the movies had gotten longer, but they were still barely a reel in length, often topping out at about 10 or 11 minutes. The stories tended to be very simple, but the Kalem Company believed it could bring epic storytelling, albeit in an abbreviated form, to the big screen.

ben hur 1907 Kalem versionThe Title Card for the first filmed version of Ben Hur in 1907

In December 1907, Kalem released “Ben Hur” as a one-reeler, consisting of 16 scenes. Wallace’s epic 500-page book had been distilled down to the biggest plot points, with intertitles employed mainly to transition between scenes, acts and settings. In typical silent film fashion (use what you have!), the crew took advantage of a chariot race being held by a local fire department on Manhattan Beach, rather than staging their own. At the time “Ben-Hur” was lauded as “the most superb moving picture spectacle ever produced in America,” and was very successful. So successful, in fact, that it pushed Lew Wallace’s living relatives to sue Kalem for copyright infringement. Up until this point, no precedent had been established for acquiring rights for films, and the subsequent court case helped to define rights acquisition and copyright protection.

While Kalem’s rather minimal effort was wildly successful, it very quickly became a dated one-reeler. Film technology advanced by leaps and bounds, especially when directors like D.W. Griffith and Allan Dwan began to pick up the microphone. Soon, the film’s wide shots, overly dramatic acting, rather simple costumes and lack of dialogue intertitles were looked upon as primitive and laughable. The material deserved another shot, and in 1922, shortly before MGM was formed, Samuel Goldwyn acquired the rights to the work. Production on the film began, but when the merger was final and Louis B. Mayer and Irving Thalberg entered the picture, the production undertook a massive overhaul. Cast and crew members were replaced until Fred Niblo was at the helm as director with Ramon Novarro cast as Ben Hur, Francis X. Bushman as Messala, May McAvoy as Esther and Carmel Myers as Iras. While location shooting in Italy was brought to an end, extravagant sets were constructed on the streets of Hollywood to continue the illusion. Technicolor excerpts were filmed for specific scenes, an incredible chariot race sequence was staged, and by the time all was said and done, the film cost $4 million dollars to complete (a far cry from the estimated $500 it took to create Kalem’s version nearly 20 years before).

Ben Hur- The Story of Christ, Ramon Navorro, 1927The famed Chariot Race from the 1927 remake of Ben-Hur: The Tale of Christ

Although it took until 1931 for the film to turn a profit (four years after it was released), the expense was certainly worth it. It remains an incredible screen spectacle, and certainly represents the silent film industry at the height of its power. The chariot race and sea battle are exciting, thrilling and remarkably daring, leaps and bounds above the race caught on film for Kalem. Although three decades had passed before production began on the 1959 version, the silent spectacle was not far from the filmmakers’ minds.

Director William Wyler had been directing films since the mid 1920s, but he brought a unique point of view to the 1959 version of “Ben-Hur.” Though uncredited, he served in the role of assistant director during the production of the silent version and was on set for the complicated and stressful filming of the chariot sequence. He brought the knowledge and experience he gained during that time, and used the advancements that had been made since its release, to build upon an already thrilling scene, and also sought direct inspiration from the scene (and the entire film) itself. “Ben Hur: A Tale of the Christ” was 30 years old by the time “Ben-Hur” premiered, but it was still pretty fresh in the minds of the cast members. The year the film premiered, Charlton Heston quipped that he landed the starring role because “I happen to be one of two men in Hollywood who can drive a chariot. Francis X. Bushman is the other — but he’s over 70.”

Ramon Novarro, Charlton Heston, William Wyler at Ben Hur premiereRamon Novarro, Charlton Heston and William Wyler at the 1959 premiere of Ben Hur

Fortunately for film fans, all three versions of “Ben Hur” have survived the passage of time, and can be enjoyed pretty readily. It’s not fair to compare the three on a technical level, but each embodies the period in which it was made perfectly, and beautifully illustrate the advancements an industry made in less than a century.

Kalem’s version is available via the silent/streaming site Harpodeon, while MGM’s versions are available via Netflix and a host of other retail sites.

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Janelle Vreeland for Classic Movie Hub

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Cary Grant DVD Giveaway: Notorious (Twitter Contest Week of January 19)

This gallery contains 1 photo.

Cary Grant “Notorious” DVD Giveaway! Entry Task for this week’s Twitter Contest. Okay, we’re ready for our next Cary Grant DVD Giveaway on Twitter this month, as part of our month-long Cary Grant Birthday Celebration!  This week CMH is giving away a copy … Continue reading

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5 Things You May Not Know About Cary Grant

 

5 Things You May Not Know About Cary Grant

too pretty

Like that today is his birthday. Happy 111th Birthday to the legend Cary Grant.

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1) He wasn’t actually Cary Grant…

Cary Grant Archie LEach

Cary Grant or Archibald Leach? You decide.

Cary Grant. The name just rolls off the tongue. It sounds almost as smooth and debonair as the way Cary Grant acts. It might surprise you, then, to learn that Cary Grant isn’t Cary Grant. When the actor, now famously remembered as Cary Grant, was born, he was born with the name Archibald Leach. Yup. Little Archie Leach. When he arrived in Hollywood in 1931, the studio execs at Paramount immediately ordered a name change for the UK born actor. And thus Cary Grant was born. Archie Leach liked the name so much that he legally changed it to Cary Grant in 1941.

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2) He had a troubled childhood…

Cary GRant and katherine hepburn in Bringing up baby

Cary Grant looking troubled with Katharine Hepburn in Bringing Up Baby (1938, Howard Hawks director)

Despite his worldly, wealthy, and sophisticated screen persona, Grant’s formative years were anything but. His father was a womanizer and his mother an emotionally unstable woman who long suffered from crippling clinical depression. Although she had high hopes for her only child, the young Cary Grant did little to distinguish himself while attending Bishop Road Primary School. At the age of 9, Grant was informed by his father that his mother had taken a “long holiday,” when in reality he had placed her in a mental institution. Grant would spend the next twenty years believing the lie, until his father confessed the truth on his deathbed. Soon after placing Elsie in the asylum, his father would remarry much to his son’s dismay. Fed up with his Dickensian life, at age 13 Grant left his insufferable environment to join a troupe of traveling acrobats.

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3) His first love wasn’t acting…

CAry GRant and Dog

Maybe it was this dog?

Yes, just like many other classic film stars, Grant’s first taste of performance wasn’t on the sound stage, but On the vaudeville circuit. At the tender age of 13, Grant left his unhappy household to join the Bob Pender Troupe, a traveling group of vaudeville comedians. While part of the troupe, Grant focused on acrobatics, tumbling, and vaudeville, which allowed him to gain a strong sense of kinesthetics and comedic timing.  The group traveled to American in 1920, successfully touring the country for two years. When the Troupe was ready to return to the UK, Grant decided to stay in America, working as a circus performer for the next decade in places such as Coney Island.

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4) His wartime efforts…

Cary Grant in I was a Male War Bride

Cary Grant in I Was a Male War Bride (1949, Howard Hawks director)

In the 1940s Hollywood became heavily involved with the World War II effort. Many stars left their comfortable careers and joined the armed forces while others danced away at the Hollywood Canteen. Although Grant was unable to fight “over there,” he did join the war effort in a big way. How so? Well, with dollars — and lots of them. First by donating his entire $137,000 salary from The Philadelphia Story to the British War Relief Fund and then by donating his entire salary from Arsenic and Old Lace, $100,000, to the U.S War relief fund. In 2015 money, that’s more 3.5 million dollars.

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5) He was almost James Bond…

Cary Grant and Audrey Hepburn in Charade

Cary Grant doing his best James Bond in Charade opposite Audrey Hepburn (1963, Stanley Donen)

Yes, that’s right. The suavest character to ever grace the big screen was almost played by the suavest actor. The producers of Dr. No sought out Cary Grant for the Role of James Bond. However, when Grant learned the role would be part of a franchise and thus had to commit to more than one film, he declined.

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Minoo Allen for Classic Movie Hub

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Cary Grant DVD Giveaway: North by Northwest (Twitter Contest Week of January 12)

Cary Grant “North by Northwest” DVD Giveaway!
Entry Task for this week’s Twitter Contest.

Okay, we’re ready for our next Cary Grant DVD Giveaway on Twitter this month —  in celebration of Cary’s birthday on the 18th!  This week CMH is giving away a copy of the fabulous Hitchcock film “North by Northwest” starring Cary along with Eva Marie Saint and James Mason — the second of our four Cary Grant DVD giveaways this month via Twitter (click here to see what else we’ll be giving away this month)…

In order to qualify to win a copy of  ”North by Northwest” on DVD, you must complete the following task by Saturday, January 17 at 7PM EST (i.e. any time between now and January 17 at 7PM EST). The winner will be selected via random drawing and announced via Twitter on Sunday January 18 around 7PM EST.

Cary Grant North by Northwest

ENTRY TASK (2-parts) to be completed by Saturday, January 17, 7PM EST:

1) Answer the below question via the comment section at the bottom of this blog post 

2) Then TWEET (not DM) the following message:
Just entered to win “North by Northwest” on DVD courtesy of @ClassicMovieHub #CaryGrant #DVDGiveaway

THE QUESTION:
Who is your favorite Cary Grant leading lady and why? 

AND — I am happy to say that Continental United States (excluding Alaska, Hawaii, and the territory of Puerto Rico) AND Canadian entrants are eligible to enter. (see contest rules for further information)

BlogHub members ARE also eligible to win if they live within the Continental United States (as noted above) and/or Canada.

If you have any questions, please feel free to DM me on Twitter @classicmoviehub.

And if you can’t wait to win the DVD, you can purchase it on amazon via the below link (click on image):

North by Northwest dvd …..

–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

 

Posted in Contests & Giveaways, Posts by Annmarie Gatti | Tagged , | 16 Comments

Cary Grant DVD Giveaway: Houseboat (Facebook Contest, January)

Cary Grant “Houseboat” DVD Giveaway!
Entry Task for this month’s Facebook Contest.

I am so happy to say that, as part of our month-long Cary Grant Birthday Celebration, CMH is giving away a copy of “Houseboat” on DVD via Facebook and this blog.

All you need to do to be eligible to win is complete the entry task below by Saturday, January 31 at 7PM EST. A winner will then be selected via random drawing and announced on Facebook and this blog post the following day.

And FYI — If you’re also on Twitter and want more chances to win some Cary Grant DVDs (see the list of giveaways here), follow us on Twitter @ClassicMovieHub as well!

cary grant and sophia lauren in houseboatThe suave and sophisticated Cary with the beautiful Sophia Loren in Houseboat

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ENTRY TASK:
Answer the below question via the comment section at the bottom of this blog post.  

THE QUESTION:
What is your favorite Cary Grant film and why?  
(I know, I know, it would be a tough choice for any of us!)

I am happy to say that Continental United States (excluding Alaska, Hawaii, and the territory of Puerto Rico) AND Canadian entrants are eligible to enter. (see contest rules for further information)

BlogHub members ARE also eligible to win if they live within the Continental United States (as noted above) and/or Canada.

If you have any questions, please feel free to DM me on Twitter @classicmoviehub.

And if you can’t wait to win the DVD, you can purchase it on amazon via the below link (click on image):

Good Luck!

…..

–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

Posted in Contests & Giveaways, Posts by Annmarie Gatti | Tagged | 11 Comments