Fredric March Overview:

Legendary actor, Fredric March, was born Ernest Frederick McIntyre Bickel on Aug 31, 1897 in Racine, WI. March died at the age of 77 on Apr 14, 1975 in Los Angeles, CA and was laid to rest in On his estate Cemetery in New Milford, CT.

MINI BIO:

Dark, stocky American leading man who settled in Hollywood with the coming of sound and remained in top roles for over 20 years, especially in the period between his two Oscars (for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and The Best Years of Our Lives) when his mellifluous voice and clever, self-effacing style won him a wide variety of roles, and he proved unexpectedly adept at sophisticated comedy. Always, in fact, rather more an actor than a star personality. Married (second of two) Florence Eldridge (F. McKechnie 1901-1988) in 1927. He also received Oscar nominations for A Star is Born, The Royal Family of Broadway and Death of a Salesman. Died from cancer.

(Source: available at Amazon Quinlan's Film Stars).

HONORS and AWARDS:

.

Fredric March was nominated for five Academy Awards, winning two for Best Actor for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (as Dr. Henry Jekyll/Mr. Hyde) and The Best Years of Our Lives (as Al Stephenson) in 1931/32 and 1946 respectively.

Academy Awards

YearAwardFilm nameRoleResult
1930/31Best ActorThe Royal Family of Broadway (1930)Tony CavendishNominated
1931/32Best ActorDr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931)Dr. Henry Jekyll/Mr. HydeWon
1937Best ActorA Star Is Born (1937)Norman Maine (Alfred Hinkel)Nominated
1946Best ActorThe Best Years of Our Lives (1946)Al StephensonWon
1951Best ActorDeath of a Salesman (1951)Willy LomanNominated
.

He was honored with one star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in the category of Motion Pictures. Fredric March's handprints and footprints were 'set in stone' at Grauman's Chinese Theater during imprint ceremony #35 on Apr 21, 1937.

BlogHub Articles:

and Veronic Lake in Rene Clair’s “I Married a Witch”

By Stephen Reginald on Oct 8, 2021 From Classic Movie Man

and Veronic Lake in Rene Clair’s “I Married a Witch” I Married a Witch (1942) is a romantic comedy fantasy directed by Rene Clair and starring and Veronica Lake. The cinematography is by Ted Tetzlaff, music by Roy Webb, and costumes by Edith Head.Th... Read full article


Carole Lombard and star in “Nothing Sacred”

By Stephen Reginald on Aug 5, 2020 From Classic Movie Man

Carole Lombard and star in “Nothing Sacred” Nothing Sacred (1937) is a screwball comedy film directed by William A. Wellman, produced by David O. Selznick, with a screenplay by Ben Hecht. Oscar Levant wrote the original music score. New York newspaper report Wally Coo... Read full article


Flawed Gents of Pre-Code: in Merrily We Go to Hell (1932)

By shadowsandsatin on Jan 15, 2017 From Shadows and Satin

From their expressions, I suspect that Jerry and Joan know what’s ahead. The films released during Hollywood?s pre-Code era undeniably have their fair share of admirable, upstanding fellas. There?s Warren William?s long-suffering hubby in Three on a Match (1932). Leslie Howard as the sensitive... Read full article


Hollywood Home Tour -

By The Metzinger Sisters on Sep 24, 2015 From Silver Scenes - A Blog for Classic Film Lovers

It's been awhile since the Hollywood Home Tour bus last passed by any celebrity homes, but Al is here today to introduce you to the latest home you will see : 1065 Ridgedale Drive, Bel-Air "Hi folks! It's Al here, welcoming you back to the Hollywood Home Tour bus. We're heading away from Bet... Read full article


Hollywood Home Tour -

By The Metzinger Sisters on Sep 24, 2015 From Silver Scenes - A Blog for Classic Film Lovers

It's been awhile since the Hollywood Home Tour bus last passed by any celebrity homes, but Al is here today to introduce you to the latest home you will see : 1065 Ridgedale Drive, Bel-Air "Hi folks! It's Al here, welcoming you back to the Hollywood Home Tour bus. We're heading away from Bet... Read full article


See all articles

Fredric March Quotes:

[Al is speaking to the banquet]
Al Stephenson: I'm glad to see you've all pulled through so well. As Mr. Milton so perfectly expressed it: our country stands today... where it stands today... wherever that is. I'm sure you'll all agree with me if I said that now is the time for all of us to stop all this nonsense, face facts, get down to brass tacks, forget about the war and go fishing. But I'm not gonna say it. I'm just going to sum the whole thing up in one word.
[Milly coughs loudly to caution him - worrying that he will tell off the boss]
Al Stephenson: My wife doesn't think I'd better sum it up in that one word. I want to tell you all that the reason for my success as a Sergeant is due primarily to my previous training in the Cornbelt Loan and Trust Company. The knowledge I acquired in the good ol' bank I applied to my problems in the infantry. For instance, one day in Okinawa, a Major comes up to me and he says, "Stephenson, you see that hill?" "Yes sir, I see it." "All right," he said. "You and your platoon will attack said hill and take it." So I said to the Major, "but that operation involves considerable risk. We haven't sufficient collateral." "I'm aware of that," said the Major, "but the fact remains that there's the hill and you are the guys who are going to take it." So I said to him, "I'm sorry, Major... no collateral, no hill." So we didn't take the hill and we lost the war. I think that little story has considerable significance, but I've forgotten what it is. And now in conclusion, I'd like to tell you a humorous anecdote. I know several humorous anecdotes, but I can't think of any way to clean them up, so I'll only say this much. I love the Cornbelt Loan and Trust Company. There are some who say that the old bank is suffering from hardening of the arteries and of the heart. I refuse to listen to such radical talk. I say that our bank is alive, it's generous, it's human, and we're going to have such a line of customers seeking and GETTING small loans that people will think we're gambling with the depositors' money. And we will be. We will be gambling on the future of this country. I thank you.


Christopher Columbus: [as he and Diego observe a native smoking tobacco] Doesn't that prove how backward they are? You never see a civilized man do that.


Howard: He said that men sort of evo-luted from Old World monkeys.
Matthew Harrison Brady: Do you hear that, friends? Old World monkeys! According to Bertram Cates, we don't even descend from good American monkeys!
[laughing]


read more quotes from Fredric March...



Share this page:
Visit the Classic Movie Hub Blog CMH
Also a Virgo






See All Virgos >>
Best Actor Oscar 1931/32




See more Best Actor awards>>
Grauman's Imprints

Also at Grauman's




See All Imprint Ceremonies >>
Fredric March on the
Hollywood Walk of Fame



See All Walk of Fame Stars >>
Fredric March Facts
Won two Tony Awards as Best Actor (Dramatic), the first in 1947 for his performance in Ruth Gordon's "Years Ago," an award shared with José Ferrer for "Cyrano de Bergerac," and the second, ten years later, in 1957, for his landmark performance in Eugene O'Neill's "Long Day's Journey Into Night." He was also nominated in the same category in 1962 for Paddy Chayefsky's "Gideon."

March and his second wife were both active supporters of the Democratic Party.

For a while after undergoing major surgery for prostate cancer in 1970 it seemed March's acting career was finished. However he was able to give one final great performance in The Iceman Cometh (1973).

See All Related Facts >>
Related Lists
Create a list



See All Related Lists >>