The Wizard of Oz Overview:

The Wizard of Oz (1939) was a Adventure - Family Film directed by King Vidor and Mervyn LeRoy and produced by Mervyn LeRoy and Arthur Freed.

The film was based on the novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and also Musical written by L. Frank Baum published in 1900 (novel); Jan 20, 1903 - Oct 3, 1903 (play performed at Majestic Theatre, NY).

SYNOPSIS

Treasured by millions with each new screening, this colorful musical fantasy defines for many the greatest achievements of Hollywood's classic period. MGM put every resource into the production, from dazzling Technicolor (an early use of the three-strip process; the colors astonished audiences of the day), marvelous songs from Arlen and Harburg that would become standards, a star-making performance from Garland (actually the studio's third choice for the role), and the thousands of studio artisans who created hundreds of costumes and 70 sets for an ambitious, months-long production led by three of the studio's most-trusted directors (and early sequences, not in the final cut, by Richard Thorpe). The result follows a Kansas farm girl (Garland) who escapes her black-and-white life and Hamilton's threat to do away with her beloved dog, Toto, to a Technicolor world that lies over the rainbow. After becoming the hero of Munchkin Land, Garland and Toto link arms with Bolger, Haley, and Lahr (the Scarecrow, Tin Man, and Cowardly Lion) to place each of their desires in front of the fabled Wizard, desires that they learn are really always within their reach. One of the classics that rewards each viewing. The special 50th anniversary video edition includes 17 minutes of extra footage, including Ray Bolger's scarecrow dance and the rehearsal and sound track from the jitterbug dance, both of which were edited out of the film; Buddy Ebsen (the initial Tin Man) performing "If I Only Had a Heart"; Judy Garland receiving her Oscar; the original theatrical promotional trailer; and a 32-page souvenir booklet.

(Source: available at Amazon AMC Classic Movie Companion).

.

The Wizard of Oz was inducted into the National Film Registry in 1989.

Academy Awards 1939 --- Ceremony Number 12 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best Art DirectionCedric Gibbons, William A. HorningNominated
Best CinematographyHal RossonNominated
Best Music - ScoringHerbert StothartWon
Best Music - SongMusic by Harold Arlen; Lyrics by E. Y. HarburgWon
Best PictureMetro-Goldwyn-MayerNominated
.

BlogHub Articles:

Cinemallennials: The Wizard of Oz (1939)?

By Dave Lewis on Jul 27, 2021 From Classic Movie Hub Blog

Cinemallennials: The Wizard of Oz (1939) For those of you who are unfamiliar with Cinemallennials, it is a bi-weekly podcast in which I, and another millennial, watch a classic film that we?ve never seen before, and discuss its significance and relevance in today?s world. In this epi... Read full article


Silver Screen Standards: The Wizard of Oz (1939)

By Jennifer Garlen on Jul 8, 2019 From Classic Movie Hub Blog

For the very first post of a column called ?Silver Screen Standards,? I can?t think of a better choice than The Wizard of Oz (1939), a film that continues to delight and amaze viewers of all ages eighty years after its original release. People often ask me to name my favorite movie, a request I find... Read full article


Book Review: “The Wizard of OZ FAQ: All That’s Left To Know About Life According To Oz”

By Stephen Reginald on Jan 19, 2019 From Classic Movie Man

Book Review: “The Wizard of OZ FAQ: All That’s Left To Know About Life According To Oz” Just when you thought you knew everything there was to know about The Wizard of Oz, here’s a book to inform you how little you actually do know about the classic film. Released durin... Read full article


Win Tickets to see ?TCM Big Screen Classics: The Wizard of Oz 80th Anniversary? (Giveaway runs now through Jan 13)

By Annmarie Gatti on Jan 8, 2019 From Classic Movie Hub Blog

Win tickets to see ?The Wizard of Oz? on the big screen! In Select Cinemas Nationwide Sun Jan 27, Tues Jan 29, Wed Jan 30 ?Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas any more.? CMH continues into our?4th year of our partnership with Fathom Events?- with the?1st?of our 14 movie ticket givea... Read full article


Silent Sunday – The Wizard of Oz (1925)

By Michael on Jan 7, 2018 From Durnmoose Movie Musings

Since Sunday tends to be a day of quiet and reflection for many people, it seems an appropriate day to celebrate silent movies. But in keeping with the “day of rest” theme, I’m just going to post this without any commentary and just sit back and let you enjoy.... Read full article


See all The Wizard of Oz articles

Quotes from

Zeke: [to pigs] Get in there, before I make a dime bank out of you.


The Wicked Witch of the West: I'll get you, my pretty... and your little dog, too!


Auntie Em: I saw you tinkering with that contraption, Hickory. Now you and Hunk get back to that wagon.
Hickory: All right, Mrs. Gale. But someday, they're going to erect a statue to me in this town, and...
Auntie Em: Don't start posing for it now.


read more quotes from The Wizard of Oz...

Facts about

Rick Polito of the Marin Independent Journal printed in Northern California is locally famous for his droll, single-sentence summations of television programs and movies which the newspaper reports will be broadcast. For the Wizard of Oz, he wrote, "Transported to a surreal landscape, a young girl kills the first person she meets and then teams up with three strangers to kill again."
There are a striking number of coincidences between events in the movie and musical cues (and lyrics) on the 1973 Pink Floyd album, "Dark Side of the Moon". It is highly improbable that the band had a print of the movie with them at Abbey Road, and few attempt to claim it to have been deliberate (David Gilmour dismisses it as nonsense), but the coincidences are remarkable nonetheless. If you begin the album on the third roar of the MGM lion (using the NTSC version of the movie, not the 25 fps PAL version which runs a little over 4% faster) the coincidences include (but are not limited to):
  • The line "balanced on the biggest wave" comes as Dorothy balances on the fence.
  • The song "On the Run" starts as Dorothy falls off the fence.
  • "The Great Gig in the Sky" begins when the tornado first appears.
  • The song "Us and Them" is played when Dorothy meets the Wicked Witch of the West.
  • The line "black and blue" is repeated when they are talking to one another (Dorothy in her blue outfit, the Wicked Witch in black).
  • The line "the lunatic is on the grass..." coincides with Dorothy meeting the Scarecrow.
  • When we first see Miss Gulch on her bicycle, the song "Time" starts with its bells and alarms.
  • Dorothy asks Professor Marvel what else h
    Curly Howard was Bert Lahr's inspiration for the role of the Lion.
    read more facts about The Wizard of Oz...
Share this page:
Visit the Classic Movie Hub Blog CMH
book or play


See All Film Adaptations >>
Best Music - Scoring Oscar 1939





















See more Academy Awards>>
Related Travel Sites


See All Related Sites >>
National Film Registry

The Wizard of Oz

Released 1939
Inducted 1989
(Sound)




See All Films in National Registry >>
Also directed by Victor Fleming




More about Victor Fleming >>
Also produced by Mervyn LeRoy




More about Mervyn LeRoy >>
Related Lists
Create a list




See All Related Lists >>
Also released in 1939




See All 1939 films >>
More "Book-Based" films



See All "Book-Based" films >>
More "Exotic Lands" films



See All "Exotic Lands" films >>