Strangers on a Train Overview:

Strangers on a Train (1951) was a Crime - Film Noir Film directed by Alfred Hitchcock and produced by Alfred Hitchcock.

The film was based on the novel of the same name written by Patricia Highsmith published in 1950.

SYNOPSIS

This Hitchcock masterpiece provided the iconic images of the tennis match at which the swiveling heads reveal a dangerous presence, the murder seen in the fallen glasses of the victim, and the crushing, out-of-control merry-go-round. In a brilliantly sinister performance, Walker plays a witty, urbane young madman who offhandedly suggests to tennis star Granger, a man he had just met on a train, that they solve each other's problems by exchanging murders. Though Granger shrugs off the suggestion as insane, Walker persists, stalking the tennis player until Granger nearly succumbs to Walker's plan. After Walker accomplishes his murder of Granger's wife at an amusement park, he redoubles his pursuit of Granger to ensure he fulfills his end of the deal, and threatens to drop evidence that would implicate Granger in his wife's murder. A terrified Granger rushes to retrieve the evidence and clear his name, leading to the climactic struggle on the merry-go-round. A terrific situation conceived by novelist Patricia Highsmith, and developed by famed mystery writer Raymond Chandler (with a polish by Ben Hecht). A primer in film style, gripping plotting, and technical mastery from Hitchcock.

(Source: available at Amazon AMC Classic Movie Companion).

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Academy Awards 1951 --- Ceremony Number 24 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best CinematographyRobert BurksNominated
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BlogHub Articles:

Strangers on a Train

By Barry P. on Nov 14, 2021 From Cinematic Catharsis

(1951) Directed by Alfred Hitchcock; Screenplay by Raymond Chandler and Czenzi Ormonde; Based on the novel by Patricia Highsmith; Starring: Farley Granger, Ruth Roman, Robert Walker, Leo G. Carroll, Patricia Hitchcock and Kasey Rogers; Available on Blu-ray and DVD Rating: **** Thanks to Rebecca ... Read full article


Don’t talk to “Strangers on a Train”

By Stephen Reginald on Oct 16, 2020 From Classic Movie Man

Don’t talk to “Strangers on a Train” Strangers on a Train (1951) is a psychological thriller directed by Alfred Hitchcock starring Farley Granger, Ruth Roman, and Robert Walker. The film was based on the novel of the same name by Patricia Highsmith (The Talented Mr. Ripley), w... Read full article


Classic Films in Focus: STRANGERS ON A TRAIN (1951)

By Jennifer Garlen on May 17, 2016 From Virtual Virago

Strangers on a Train (1951) brought Alfred Hitchcock back to box office success after the lull that followed Notorious (1946), and today it remains a favorite with the auteur's fans. Hitchcock presents a deliciously twisted thriller in this tale of murder and blackmail, with Farley Granger returning... Read full article


Classic Films in Focus: STRANGERS ON A TRAIN (1951)

By Jennifer Garlen on May 17, 2016 From Virtual Virago

Strangers on a Train (1951) brought Alfred Hitchcock back to box office success after the lull that followed Notorious (1946), and today it remains a favorite with the auteur's fans. Hitchcock presents a deliciously twisted thriller in this tale of murder and blackmail, with Farley Granger returning... Read full article


Strangers on a Train (1951)

By Beatrice on Jul 20, 2015 From Flickers in Time

Strangers on a Train Directed by Alfred Hitchcock Written by Raymond Chandler, Czenzi Ormonde and Whitfield Cook from a novel by Patricia Highsmith 1951/USA Warner Bros. Repeat viewing/My DVD Collection #244 of 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die The bravura direction and Robert Walker’... Read full article


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Quotes from

Bruno Anthony: I have a theory that you should do everything before you die.


Guy Haines: Doesn't that bloodhound ever relax? He sticks so close he's beginning to grow on me - like a fungus.


Mrs. Cunningham: You know, I read of a case once. I think it would be a wonderful idea! I can take him out in the car, and when we get to a very lonely spot, knock him on the head with a hammer, pour gasoline over him and over the car, and set the whole thing ablaze!
[giggles]
Bruno Anthony: [scowls] And have to walk all the way home? Oh, no.
Mrs. Cunningham: [meek] No? Oh...
Bruno Anthony: No, no. I have the best way, and the best tools.
[raises hands]
Bruno Anthony: Simple, silent, and quick - the silent part being the most important. Let me show you what I mean. You don't mind if I borrow your neck for a moment, do you?
Mrs. Cunningham: [simpers] Well... if it's not for long!


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Facts about

The train station scenes in Metcalf were filmed at the former New Haven Railroad station, Danbury, Connecticut, which is today the home of the Danbury Railroad Museum.
The stunt where the man crawled under the carousel was not done with trick photography. Alfred Hitchcock claimed that this was the most dangerous stunt ever performed under his direction, and would never allow it to be done again.
As Guy leaves the last match, part of a quotation clearly including the words "two impostors" is visible on the beam above his head. It is from Rudyard Kipling's poem "If." The line reads "If you can meet with triumph and disaster / And treat those two impostors just the same..."
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