Mutiny on the Bounty Overview:

Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) was a Adventure - Drama Film directed by Frank Lloyd and produced by Frank Lloyd, Irving Thalberg and Albert Lewin.

The film was based on the novel of the same name written by Charles Nordhoff and James Norman Hall published in 1932.

Academy Awards 1935 --- Ceremony Number 8 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best ActorClark GableNominated
Best ActorCharles LaughtonNominated
Best ActorFranchot ToneNominated
Best DirectorFrank LloydNominated
Best Film EditingMargaret BoothNominated
Best Music - ScoringMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studio Music Department, Nat W. Finston, head of department (Score by Herbert SNominated
Best WritingTalbot Jennings, Jules Furthman, Carey WilsonNominated
Best Art DirectionArt Direction: George W. Davis, J. McMillan Johnson; Set Decoration: Henry Grace, Hugh HuntNominated
Best CinematographyRobert L. SurteesNominated
Best Film EditingJohn McSweeney, Jr.Nominated
Best Music - ScoringBronislau KaperNominated
Best Music - SongMusic by Bronislau Kaper; Lyrics by Paul Francis WebsterNominated
Best PictureAaron Rosenberg, ProducerNominated
Best PictureMetro-Goldwyn-MayerWon
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BlogHub Articles:

Mutiny on the Bounty (1962)

By Beatrice on Nov 1, 2017 From Flickers in Time

Mutiny on the Bounty Directed by Lewis Milestone Written by Charles Lederer from the novel by Charles Norhoff and James Norman Hall 1962/USA Arcola Pictures First viewing/Netflix rental Give me the Clark Gable-Charles Laughton version any day. The story should be familiar to most of my readers. ?... Read full article


Mutiny on the Bounty (1935)

By Beatrice on May 2, 2013 From Flickers in Time

Mutiny on the Bounty Directed by Frank Lloyd 1935/USA Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) Repeat viewing #89 of 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die In 1787, the HMS Bounty departs Portsmouth for Tahiti, carrying a crew largely composed of impressed sailors. ?The ship is helmed by Captain William Bligh (... Read full article


Mutiny on the Bounty (1)

By Alyson on May 29, 2011 From The Best Picture Project

Back when I reviewed the 1962 remake of Mutiny on the Bounty, I was left with many questions about the original, mostly was the remake necessary. ?It was not. ?Not at all. The HMS Bounty is about to leave for a two year mission to Tahiti to bring back a supply of bread fruit. ?Ran by the notorious C... Read full article


Mutiny on the Bounty (2)

By Alyson on Dec 2, 2010 From The Best Picture Project

This is a remake of the 1935 Best Picture winner, which I have yet to see. ?Why it would need to be remade is beyond me, perhaps I?ll have an answer for that in a few months. In 1787 the Bounty is on a mission from England to Tahiti to find a plant called bread-fruit. ?It seems to be a super-food th... Read full article


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Quotes from

Captain William Bligh: During the recent heavy weather, I've had the opportunity to watch all of you at work on deck and aloft. You don't know wood from canvas! And it seems you don't want to learn! Well, I'll have to give you a lesson


Captain William Bligh: [pointing at three sailors] You, you, you, step forward! You three are a disgrace to salt water! Ten days half rations.


Lord Hood: Have you anything to say before the sentence of this court is passed upon you?
Byam: Milord, much as I desire to live, I'm not afraid to die. Since I first sailed on the Bounty over four years ago, I've know how men can be made to suffer worse things than death, cruelly, beyond duty, beyond necessity.
[turns to Captain Bligh]
Byam: Captain Bligh, you've told your story of mutiny on the Bounty, how men plotted against you, seized your ship, cast you adrift in an open boat, a great venture in science brought to nothing, two British ships lost. But there's another story, Captain Bligh, of ten cocoanuts and two cheeses. A story of a man who robbed his seamen, cursed them, flogged them, not to punish but to break their spirit. A story of greed and tyranny, and of anger against it, of what it cost.
[turns to Lord Hood]
Byam: One man, milord, would not endure such tyranny.
[turns again to Captain Bligh]
Byam: That's why you hounded him. That's why you hate him, hate his friends. And that's why you're beaten. Fletcher Christian's still free.
[back to Lord Hood]
Byam: Christian lost, too, milord. God knows he's judged himself more harshly than you could judge him.
[turns to Fletcher Christian's father]
Byam: I say to his father, "He was my friend. No finer man ever lived."
[addresses the court again]
Byam: I don't try to justify his crime, his mutiny, but I condemn the tyranny that drove 'im to it. I don't speak here for myself alone or for these men you condemn. I speak in their names, in Fletcher Christian's name, for all men at sea. These men don't ask for comfort. They don't ask for safety. If they could speak to you they'd say, "Let us choose to do our duty willingly, not the choice of a slave, but the choice of free Englishmen." They ask only the freedom that England expects for every man. If one man among you believe that - *one man* - he could command the fleets of England, He could sweep the seas for England. If he called his men to their duty not by flaying their backs, but by lifting their hearts... their... That's all.


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Facts about

The Bounty and Pandora were actual life size ships that were built from two old wooden schooners. The builders added outer ribs and frames to the hulls to get the correct width and after replanking them added concrete inside as ballast. Then they were given three masts and rigged in authentic 18th. century style. A 27 foot long model was burned at the end of the film. It was an exact replica of the life size Bounty, but 1-5th of its actual size.
Irving Thalberg cast Clark Gable and Charles Laughton together in the hope that they would hate each other, making their on screen sparring more lifelike. He knew that Gable, a notorious homophobe, would not care for Laughton's overt homosexuality and would feel inferior to the RADA-trained Shakespearean actor. Relations between the two stars broke down completely after Laughton brought his muscular boyfriend to the island as his personal masseur. They were an obviously devoted couple and would go everywhere together, while Gable would turn away in disgust. In addition, Laughton felt that he should have won the Best Actor Oscar for The Barretts of Wimpole Street. In the event, he was not even nominated and the award went to Gable for It Happened One Night.
The sterns of the larger ships in the harbor at the beginning of the film are first rate ships of the line that are similar to the HMS Victory. The producers tried to make these scenes as accurate as possible and it shows.
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