A Streetcar Named Desire Overview:

A Streetcar Named Desire (1951) was a Drama - Romance Film directed by Elia Kazan and produced by Charles K. Feldman.

The film was based on the play of the same name written by Tennessee Williams performed at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre, NY from Dec 3, 1947 - Dec 17, 1949.

SYNOPSIS

Brando's performance as a sexually electrifying brute established him as the premier actor of his day, and gave us the timeless image of him holding his head in bewildered rage as he bellows, "Stella!" Director Kazan brought most of his Broadway cast to Hollywood for the screen version of Tennessee Williams's stage triumph (the only exception being Jessica Tandy, the stage Blanche). Brando had become a sensation in the stage role of Stanley, and he shows why in the film adaptation as he exposes pure, animal energy to the audience. When unstable Blanche DuBois (Leigh) moves in with her pregnant sister Stella (Hunter) and brother-in-law, Stanley Kowalski (Brando), Stanley and Blanche circle each other like wary animals. The sexual tension and mistrust build to a violent crescendo after Brando learns Leigh has squandered their family?s estate. The film was rereleased in 1993, with an additional four minutes of footage that did not make it past censors in 1951.

(Source: available at Amazon AMC Classic Movie Companion).

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A Streetcar Named Desire was inducted into the National Film Registry in 1999.

Academy Awards 1951 --- Ceremony Number 24 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best ActorMarlon BrandoNominated
Best Supporting ActorKarl MaldenWon
Best ActressVivien LeighWon
Best Supporting ActressKim HunterWon
Best Art DirectionArt Direction: Richard Day; Set Decoration: George James HopkinsWon
Best CinematographyHarry StradlingNominated
Best Costume DesignLucinda BallardNominated
Best DirectorElia KazanNominated
Best PictureCharles K. Feldman, ProducerNominated
Best WritingTennessee WilliamsNominated
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BlogHub Articles:

Review: A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)

By 4 Star Film Fan on Oct 14, 2017 From 4 Star Films

Blanche Dubois and Stanley Kowalski. They’re both so iconic not simply in the lore of cinema history but literature and American culture in general. It’s difficult to know exactly what to do with them.?Stanley Kowalski the archetypical chauvinistic beast. Driven by anger, prone to abuse,... Read full article


Review: A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)

By 4 Star Film Fan on Oct 14, 2017 From 4 Star Films

Blanche Dubois and Stanley Kowalski. They’re both so iconic not simply in the lore of cinema history but literature and American culture in general. It’s difficult to know exactly what to do with them.?Stanley Kowalksi?the archetypical chauvinistic beast. Driven by anger, prone to abuse,... Read full article


A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)

on Aug 11, 2014 From Journeys in Classic Film

Elia Kazan’s adaptation of A Streetcar Named Desire is an important film in my life. ?I first saw it in community college when we wrote compared?and contrasted the play and the film (there’s a lot of watering down in the movie). ?I wrote so much on Blanche DuBoise that by the end I was s... Read full article


A Streetcar Named Desire (1)

By The Cinemaniac on Mar 31, 2013 From Cinemaniac Reviews

Review No. 446 Directed by: Elia Kazan Screenplay by: Tennessee Williams and Oscar Saul Based on: “A Streetcar Named Desire” by Tennessee Williams Blanche DuBois: Vivien Leigh Stanley Kowalski: Marlon Brando Stella Kowalski: Kim Hunter Harold “Mitch” Mitchell: Karl Malden Al... Read full article


A Streetcar Named Desire (1951)

By 4 Star Film Fan on Sep 10, 2012 From 4 Star Films

The film adaption of the Tennessee Williams’ play, A Street Car Named Desire was directed by Elia Kazan and stars Marlon Brando as the rough Polish husband of Stella Kowalski. Vivien Leigh plays the role of Stella’s airy and superficial sister Blanche. The film opens in the French Quarte... Read full article


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Quotes from

Stanley Kowalski: Now that's how I'm gonna clear the table. Don't you ever talk that way to me. 'Pig,' 'Pollack,' 'disgusting,' 'vulgar,' 'greasy.' Those kind of words have been on your tongue and your sister's tongue just too much around here. What do you think you are? A pair of queens? Now just remember what Huey Long said - that every man's a king - and I'm the King around here, and don't you forget it.


Blanche DuBois: I said I was sorry three times!


Stanley Kowalski: She moved to the hotel called Flamingo which is a second class hotel that has the advantages of not interfering with the private and social life of the personalities there. Now the Flamingo is used to all kinds of goings-on. But even the management of the Flamingo was impressed by Dame Blanche. And in fact, they were so impressed that they requested her to turn in her room-key for permanently. And this, this happened a couple of weeks before she showed here... The trouble with Dame Blanche was that she couldn't put on her act any more in Oriel because they got wised up. And after two or three dates, they quit and then she goes on to another one, the same old line, the same old act, and the same old hooey. And as time went by, she became the town character, regarded not just as different but downright loco and nuts. She didn't re. sign temporarily because of her nerves. She was kicked out before the spring term ended. And I hate to tell you the reason that step was taken. A seventeen-year-old kid she got mixed up with - and the boy's dad learned about it and he got in touch with the high-school superintendent. And there was practically a town ordinance passed against her.


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Facts about

The poetry quote, " ... and if God choose, I shall love thee better after death", is from "Sonnets from the Portuguese, No. 43" by Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1850).
Despite giving the definitive portrayal of Stanley Kowalski, Marlon Brando said he privately detested the character. However, it should be added that Brando was an eccentric character who loved misleading people and playing pranks.
Jessica Tandy was originally slated to play Blanche, after creating the role on Broadway. The role was given to Vivien Leigh (after Olivia de Havilland refused it) because she had more box-office appeal.
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Best Actress Oscar 1951






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National Film Registry

A Streetcar Named Desire

Released 1951
Inducted 1999
(Sound)




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Also directed by Elia Kazan




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Also produced by Charles K. Feldman




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