Lee J. Cobb Overview:

Legendary actor, Lee J. Cobb, was born Leo Jacoby on Dec 8, 1911 in New York City, NY. Cobb died at the age of 64 on Feb 11, 1976 in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles and was laid to rest in Mount Sinai Memorial Park Cemetery in Los Angeles, CA.

HONORS and AWARDS:

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Although Cobb was nominated for two Oscars, he never won a competitive Academy Award.

Academy Awards

YearAwardFilm nameRoleResult
1954Best Supporting ActorOn the Waterfront (1954)Johnny FriendlyNominated
1958Best Supporting ActorThe Brothers Karamazov (1958)Fyodor KaramazovNominated
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Lee J. Cobb Quotes:

Col. Feroud: I have here your dossier. It contains the history of your life. You're a man entirely without moral scruples of any kind. You supply the Syrians with guns and ammunition, but I respect them, they fight for a cause. Your cause is only money. While Frenchmen and Syrians kill each other, you profit by it. According to military law you have to be shot. The punishment seems hardly adequate.
Harry Smith: What have you got me up here for? To watch me sweat, to watch me crawl? I'll bet they didn't bring Nasir up here before they shot him.
Col. Feroud: What a pity you could only die once.
Harry Smith: Sure, I know I'm going to be shot, but not for running guns, but because I'm something special. I made a monkey out of you. I'm the guy that ran off with your girl.
Col. Feroud: Don't you realize if I *wanted* you shot, you'd be in a ditch right now?


[Juror 8 has convinced everyone to change their votes to 'not guilty' except for Juror 3]
Juror #7: Well, what do we do now?
Juror #8: [to #3] You're alone.
Juror #3: I don't care whether I'm alone or not! It's my right.
Juror #8: It's your right.
Juror #3: Well, what do you want? I say he's guilty.
Juror #8: We want to hear your arguments.
Juror #3: I gave you my arguments!
Juror #8: We're not convinced. We want to hear them again. We have as much time as it takes.
Juror #3: Everything... every single thing that took place in that courtroom, but I mean everything... says he's guilty. What d'ya think? I'm an idiot or somethin'? Why don't cha take that stuff about the old man; the old man who lived there and heard every thing? Or this business about the knife! What, 'cause we found one exactly like it? The old man SAW him. Right there on the stairs. What's the difference how many seconds it was? Every single thing. The knife falling through a hole in his pocket... you can't PROVE he didn't get to the door! Sure, you can take all the time hobblin' around the room, but you can't PROVE it! And what about this business with the El? And the movies! There's a phony deal if I ever heard one. I betcha five thousand dollars I'd remember the movies I saw! I'm tellin' ya: every thing that's gone on has been twisted... and turned. This business with the glasses. How do you know she didn't have 'em on? This woman testified in open court! And what about hearin' the kid yell... huh? I'm tellin' ya, I've got all the facts here...
Juror #3: [He struggles with his notebook, throws it on the table. The photo of him with his son is on top] Here... Ah. Well, that's it - that's the whole case!
[He turns towards the window as the other jurors stare at him]
Juror #3: Well... say something! You lousy bunch of bleedin' hearts. You're not goin' to intimidate me - I'm entitled to my opinion!
[He sees the picture of his son on the table]
Juror #3: Rotten kids... you work your life out! [He grabs the picture and tears it to pieces. He suddenly realizes what he's doing]
Juror #3: [Breaks down] No. Not guilty. Not guilty.

Harry R. Baker: [when his wife complains about his habit of entering and tossing the evening newspaper on the dining room table] It's clean, I had it boiled.


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Lee J. Cobb Facts
Was succeeded in two of his roles by the late George C. Scott. Cobb died shortly after playing Lt. Kinderman in The Exorcist (1973). Scott took over the part in the third film. Cobb played Juror #3 in 12 Angry Men (1957) and Scott played that part in the television remake. Scott also played Willy Loman in the Broadway revival of "Death of a Salesman," a part Cobb originated. 12 Angry Men (1997) (TV).

Arthur Miller offered him the lead role of Eddie Carbone in his Broadway play "A View from the Bridge." While an outsider might think that the politically progressive Miller would be hostile to the actor due to Cobb's friendly testimony before the infamous House Un-American Activities Committee, during which he "named names," Miller thought Cobb would be ideal for the role. Himself a target of the witch hunt for alleged Communists undertaken by the government, Miller believed that Cobb would bring real intensity to Carbone, who informs on his relatives to the immigration service, as he himself had been an informer. Cobb turned down the role, as he believed that to accept it would open him up to retaliation from the reactionary right and jeopardize his career.

Former father-in-law of Christopher Morgan.

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