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The Magnificent Seven Overview:

The Magnificent Seven (1960) was a Western - Adventure Film directed by John Sturges and produced by Walter Mirisch and John Sturges.

Academy Awards 1960 --- Ceremony Number 33 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best Art DirectionTakashi MatsuyamaNominated
Best Costume DesignKohei EzakiNominated
Best Music - ScoringElmer BernsteinNominated
.

BlogHub Articles:

The Magnificent Seven (1960)

By Beatrice on Jan 14, 2017 From Flickers in Time

The Magnificent Seven Directed by John Sturges Written by William Roberts 1960/USA Mirisch Company/Alpha Productions/Alpha First viewing/Netflix rental Calvera: And? Vin: He said, “It seemed to be a good idea at the time.” This might be the most famous mainstream film I had never seen... Read full article


Review: The Magnificent Seven (1960)

By 4 Star Film Fan on Aug 18, 2016 From 4 Star Films

?Nobody throws me my own guns and says ride on.?Nobody? ~ James Coburn as Britt People always resonate with stories of valor, honor, and bravery. It doesn’t matter if it?s a war, a samurai, or a western picture. Thus, Akira Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai rather seamlessly became The Magnificen... Read full article


Review: The Magnificent Seven (1960)

By 4 Star Film Fan on Aug 18, 2016 From 4 Star Films

?Nobody throws me my own guns and says ride on.?Nobody? ~ James Coburn as Britt People always resonate with stories of valor, honor, and bravery. It doesn’t matter if it?s a war film, a tale of samurai, or a western. Thus, Akira Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai rather seamlessly became The Magni... Read full article


Will It Be As Magnificent As Its Predecessors? – Here’s The New Trailer For The Magnificent Seven

By Michael on Apr 22, 2016 From Durnmoose Movie Musings

Considering that the original was an adaptation of Akira Kurosawa’s Seven Samurai, one of the things that I’m kind of curious about is how much credit will be given to that movie when it comes to this modern remake of John Sturges’s 1960 movie The Magnificent Seven. Another questio... Read full article


Book Review: The Making of "The Magnificent Seven"

By Rick29 on Jul 6, 2015 From Classic Film & TV Cafe

In his new book The Making of The Magnificent Seven: Behind the Scenes of the Pivotal Western, author Brian Hannan provides a fascinating look into how the 1959 Western classic reached the silver screen. He also makes a compelling argument that John Sturges' remake of Akira Kurosawa's Seven Samurai ... Read full article


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Quotes from

Chamlee: I'm sorry, friend, but there'll be no funeral.
Henry: What?
Chamlee: Oh, the grave is dug and the defunct there is as ready as the embalmers ought to make him. But there'll be no funeral.
Henry: What's the matter? Didn't I pay enough?
Chamlee: It's not a question of money. For twenty dollars, I'd plant anybody with a hoop and a holler. But the funeral is off.
Henry: Now how do you like that. I want him buried, you want him buried and if he could sit up and talk, he'd second the motion. Now that's as unanimous as you can get.


Wallace: You tell 'em! I won, didn't I?
Britt: You lost.


Chris: The old man was right. Only the farmers won. We lost. We always lose.


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Facts about

John Sturges faced a major problem during filming. The screenplay mentioned which of the Seven died, but in no order (the battle was not choreographed), and without being clear as to how. So Sturges came up with the idea to kill off the dying members of the seven in the order they had been cast, which went as follows: Lee (Robert Vaughn), Harry Luck (Brad Dexter), Bernardo O'Reilly (Charles Bronson), and Britt (James Coburn). Vaughn originally lobbied against dying first (because the character was especially created for him), so Sturges came up with a new solution, and the final death sequence which appears on film went as follows: Harry Luck (Dexter) is shot while riding back into town to join the seven who were holed up in the cantina, Lee (Vaughn) is shot after killing three bandits who were holding several villagers prisoner in a farmhouse, Britt (Coburn) is shot in the chest as he prepares to throw his knife and O'Reilly (Bronson) is wounded several times before this, but finally dies after being shot in the stomach while pushing the children to safety.
Yul Brynner was married on the set; the celebration used many of the same props as the fiesta scene.
When filming began in Mexico, problems arose with the local censors, who demanded changes to the ways that the Mexican villagers would be portrayed. Walter Newman, who had written the screenplay, was asked to travel to the location to make the necessary script revisions, but refused. The changes written in by William Roberts were deemed significant enough to merit him a co-writing credit. Newman refused to share the credit, though, and had his name removed from the film entirely.
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Best Costume Design Oscar 1956











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Also directed by John Sturges




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Also produced by Walter Mirisch




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Also released in 1960




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