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The Lady from Shanghai Overview:

The Lady from Shanghai (1947) was a Crime - Drama Film directed by Orson Welles and produced by Harry Cohn, Orson Welles, William Castle and Richard Wilson.

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The Lady from Shanghai (1947, Orson Welles)

By Andrew Wickliffe on Sep 2, 2019 From The Stop Button

It?s immaterial to the film overall but I want to talk about how Welles compensates for projection composites looking like projection composites. He changes up his focus, sometimes focusing on the person in the foreground, sometimes not. Is it intentional? Is he really trying to compensate? Well, th... Read full article


The Lady from Shanghai (1947, Orson Welles)

By Andrew Wickliffe on Sep 2, 2019 From The Stop Button

It?s immaterial to the film overall but I want to talk about how Welles compensates for projection composites looking like projection composites. He changes up his focus, sometimes focusing on the person in the foreground, sometimes not. Is it intentional? Is he really trying to compensate? Well, th... Read full article


The Lady from Shanghai (1947, Orson Welles)

on Sep 2, 2019 From The Stop Button

It?s immaterial to the film overall but I want to talk about how Welles compensates for projection composites looking like projection composites. He changes up his focus, sometimes focusing on the person in the foreground, sometimes not. Is it intentional? Is he really trying to compensate? Well, th... Read full article


The Lady from Shanghai (1947, Orson Welles)

on Sep 2, 2019 From The Stop Button

It?s immaterial to the film overall but I want to talk about how Welles compensates for projection composites looking like projection composites. He changes up his focus, sometimes focusing on the person in the foreground, sometimes not. Is it intentional? Is he really trying to compensate? Well, th... Read full article


Review: The Lady from Shanghai (1947): Funhouse Film Noir

By 4 Star Film Fan on Aug 15, 2019 From 4 Star Films

Before I knew the word “auteur” I think subconsciously I began to realize Orson Welles was gifted with this kind of innate?artistic force that cemented all his pictures together. It’s part of what made him such a terror to work with and simultaneously a genius of such mammoth accom... Read full article


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Quotes from

Arthur Bannister: Do you drink?
Michael O'Hara: I beg your pardon?
Arthur Bannister: I asked you if you drink.
Michael O'Hara: Whatever's set in front of me. Doesn't have to be wholesome, as long as it's strong.


Michael O'Hara: [First lines] When I start out to make a fool of myself, there's very little can stop me. If I'd known where it would end, I'd never let anything start... if I'd been in my right mind, that is. But once I'd seen her, I was not in my right mind for some time.


Michael O'Hara: Some people can smell danger. Not me.


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Facts about

Orson Welles was very displeased with the score put together by the studio-appointed composer. In a test screening, he put a temp stock score on which was supposed to be a model for the composer. The composer completely disregarded Welles' precisely laid-out blueprint. In particular, the final mirror scene was supposed to be unscored, to create the sense of terror.
Near the end of shooting, Orson Welles told Columbia executives that he wanted a complete set repainted on a Saturday for shooting on Monday. Columbia exec Jack Fier told Welles it was impossible, because of union rules and the expense that would be incurred by calling in a crew of painters to work on a weekend. Welles and several friends broke into the paint department that Saturday and repainted the set themselves, and when they were finished they hung a banner on the set that read "The Only Thing We Have to Fear is Fier Himself". When the union painters arrived at work on Monday and saw that the set had been repainted by someone else, they refused to work, threw a picket line around the studio and threatened to stay on strike until a union crew was paid triple time for the work that had been done (which was why Fier had refused to authorize the work in the first place). To placate the union, Fier agreed to pay them what they wanted but put the cost on Welles' personal bill. In addition, he had the union painters paint a banner saying "All's Well That Ends Welles".
Columbia Pictures chief Harry Cohn thought the movie would ruin his star, Rita Hayworth, and held the release of the picture back for one year. Cohn ordered director Orson Welles to insert "glamour" shots (close-ups) of Hayworth. Because of the success of Hayworth's singing in other films, Cohn ordered filming of the scene where Hayworth sings "Please Don't Kiss Me."
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Also directed by Orson Welles




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Also produced by Harry Cohn




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