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The Bridge on the River Kwai Overview:

The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) was a Adventure - Drama Film directed by David Lean and produced by Sam Spiegel.

The film was based on the novel The Bridge over the River Kwai written by Pierre Boulle published in 1952.

SYNOPSIS:

Directed by the now-legendary David Lean, The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957) is an epic WWII war film starring Alec Guinness, Sessue Hayakawa and William Holden. The film was adapted from the 1952 best-selling novel, Le Pont de la Riviere Kwai, by?Pierre Boulle, which, although largely fictitious, was based on Boulle?s own war experiences and also pulls historical context from the construction of the POW-built 1942-43 Burma-Siam railway.

The film is set in a Japanese prisoner-of-war camp in Burma (filmed in Ceylon, now Sri Lanka), where camp commandant Colonel Saito (Sessue Hayakawa) and newly-arrived prisoner, British officer Lieutenant Colonel Nicholson (Alec Guinness), clash over Saito?s insistence that POW officers work as laborers to build a railway bridge. This begins an intense battle of wills that ultimately leads to an ironic outcome as Nicholson tasks himself, and his men (officers included), with building the bridge - not only a bridge, but a ?proper bridge? ? to raise morale and showcase British superiority to the Japanese. Meanwhile, American prisoner, Commander Shears (William Holden), manages to escape the un-escapable camp, but is later coerced into joining a British-led commando team that must return to the camp and destroy the bridge. Now, I don?t want to spoil the ending of this exquisite and powerful film for you, so suffice it to say, that the iconic last line of the movie captures it all: ?Madness! Madness!?

(Source: article by Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

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The Bridge on the River Kwai was inducted into the National Film Registry in 1997.

Academy Awards 1957 --- Ceremony Number 30 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best ActorAlec GuinnessWon
Best Supporting ActorSessue HayakawaNominated
Best CinematographyJack HildyardWon
Best DirectorDavid LeanWon
Best Film EditingPeter TaylorWon
Best Music - ScoringMalcolm ArnoldWon
Best PictureSam Spiegel, ProducerWon
Best WritingMichael Wilson, Carl Foreman, Pierre BoulleWon
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BlogHub Articles:

The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)

By Beatrice on Jun 28, 2016 From Flickers in Time

The Bridge on the River Kwai Directed by David Lean Written by Carl Foreman and Michael Wilson (both uncredited) from a novel by Pierre Boulle 1957/UK/USA Columbia Pictures Corporation/Horizon Pictures Repeat viewing/Netflix rental #340 of 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die David Lean makes... Read full article


The Bridge on the River Kwai

By Michael on May 24, 2011 From Le Mot du Cinephiliaque

The Bridge on the River Kwai (David Lean, 1957) The Bridge on the River Kwai is a widely popular and acclaimed film from one of the most famous British directors of all-time: David Lean. With 7 Oscars and a #83spot on the not-so-viable IMDb Top 250, the movie should at least ring a bell to anyone. ... Read full article


The Bridge on the River Kwai

By Alyson on Nov 9, 2010 From The Best Picture Project

In a Japanese POW camp, prisoners are overworked and the death rate is extremely high. ?We first meet Shears (William Holden) as he?s digging a grave, by the time he?s finished he can?t even remember who he just buried. ?He has seen so many men arrive and die in this camp his spirit is nearly broken... Read full article


See all The Bridge on the River Kwai articles

Quotes from

Col. Nicholson: One day the war will be over. And I hope that the people that use this bridge in years to come will remember how it was built and who built it. Not a gang of slaves, but soldiers, British soldiers, Clipton, even in captivity.


Maj. Clipton: Madness! Madness!


Colonel Saito: I hate the British! You are defeated but you have no shame. You are stubborn but you have no pride. You endure but you have no courage. I hate the British!


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Facts about

Sessue Hayakawa edited his copy of the script to contain only his lines of dialog. This way, he remained oblivious to the real nature of his character's fate.
Howard Hawks was asked to direct, but declined. After the box-office failure of Land of the Pharaohs, he didn't want a second one in a row, and he thought the critics would love this movie but the public would stay away. One particular concern was the all-male lead roles.
The film's story was loosely based on a true World War II incident, and the real-life character of Lieutenant Colonel Philip Toosey. One of a number of Allied POW's, Toosey was in charge of his men from late 1942 through May 1943 when they were ordered to build two Kwai River bridges in Burma (one of steel, one of wood), to help move Japanese supplies and troops from Bangkok to Rangoon. In reality, the actual bridge took 8 months to build (rather than two months), and they were actually used for two years, and were only destroyed two years after their construction - in late June 1945. The memoirs of the 'real' Colonel Nicholson were compiled into a 1991 book by Peter Davies entitled The Man Behind the Bridge.
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Bridge on the River Kwai, The (1957) Sat. 07 Sep. 03:00 PM EST

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Best Picture Oscar 1957






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National Film Registry

The Bridge on the River Kwai

Released 1957
Inducted 1997
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Also directed by David Lean




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Also produced by Sam Spiegel




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Also released in 1957




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