King Kong Overview:

King Kong (1933) was a Adventure - Fantasy Film directed by Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack and produced by David O. Selznick, Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack.

King Kong was inducted into the National Film Registry in 1991.

BlogHub Articles:

Win Tickets to see ?TCM Big Screen Classics: King Kong? (Giveaway runs now through Feb 22)

By Annmarie Gatti on Feb 2, 2020 From Classic Movie Hub Blog

Win tickets to see ?King Kong? on the Big Screen!In Select Cinemas NationwideSun March 15 CMH continues into our 5h year of our partnership with Fathom Events ? with the 4th of our 15 movie ticket giveaways for 2020, courtesy of Fathom Events! That said, we?ll be giving away FOUR PAIRS of tick... Read full article


Classic Movie Tourism: King Kong on Broadway

By Jennifer Garlen on Jan 16, 2019 From Virtual Virago

Some 85 years after the great ape's original screen debut, King Kong has made a triumphant return to New York City, this time as the star of his own Broadway musical. There have been plenty of sequels, reboots, revisions, and reincarnations featuring the oversized cinema gorilla, but I've never seen... Read full article


King Kong Escapes (1967, Honda Ishir?)

By Andrew Wickliffe on Jun 10, 2017 From The Stop Button

Despite lacking special effects and a phoned in score from Ifukube Akira (reusing his previous Godzilla themes to various effect), King Kong Escapes has quite a bit of charm to it. The film opens with Kong enthusiasts?really, they?re sitting around drawing pictures of him?Rhodes Reason and Takarada ... Read full article


1001 Classic Movies: King Kong (1933)

By Amanda Garrett on Mar 6, 2017 From Old Hollywood Films

King Kong (1933) is one of the 1001 classic movies you should see. Each Monday, I'm going to recommend a classic movie you should see (for the reasons behind the 1001 series and reviews of earlier films covered go here). The new film, Kong: Skull Island (2017) has brought the monkey movie back in... Read full article


Classic Films in Focus: KING KONG (1933)

By Jennifer Garlen on Jun 23, 2015 From Virtual Virago

King Kong rules as the alpha ape among a crowd of cinematic simians, and the original 1933 movie that bears his name has influenced countless other films. Many of our modern blockbusters can trace their roots to King Kong; its special effects work and emphasis on big action sequences showed later fi... Read full article


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Quotes from

Carl Denham: And now, ladies and gentlemen, before I tell you any more, I'm going to show you the greatest thing your eyes have ever beheld. He was a king and a god in the world he knew, but now he comes to civilization merely a captive - a show to gratify your curiosity. Ladies and gentlemen, look at Kong, the Eighth Wonder of the World.


[Carl Denham wants to capture Kong]
Jack Driscoll: Why, you're crazy. Besides that, he's on a cliff where a whole army couldn't get at him.
Carl Denham: Yeah, if he stays there.
[Looking at Ann Darrow]
Carl Denham: But we've got something he wants.


Captain Englehorn: And you expect to photograph it?
Carl Denham: If it's there, you bet I'll photograph it!
Jack Driscoll: Suppose it doesn't like having its picture taken?
Carl Denham: Well, now you know why I brought along those cases of gas bombs


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Facts about

This film was successfully reissued worldwide numerous times; some claim it was the first ever re-released film. In the 1938 reissue, several scenes of excessive violence and sex were cut to comply with the Production Code enforced in 1934. Though many of the censored scenes were restored by Janus Films in 1971 (including the censored sequence in which Kong peels off Fay Wray's clothes), one deleted scene has never been found, shown publicly only once during a preview screening in San Bernardino, California in January 1933. It was a graphic scene following Kong shaking four sailors off the log bridge, causing them to fall into a ravine where they were eaten alive by giant spiders. At the preview screening, audience members screamed and either left the theatre or talked about the grisly sequence throughout the subsequent scenes, disrupting the film. Said the film's producer, Merian C. Cooper, "It stopped the picture cold, so the next day back at the studio, I took it out myself."
Originally, there was supposed to be an overhead shot of Kong falling from the Empire State Building. This was accomplished by adding Kong in post-production, falling towards the ground. Real footage of the building was used, but when the producers watched the scene they realized that viewers could see through Kong, especially as he passed the darker ledges, so it was cut. This clip has made its way into documentaries on the film but, more commonly, can be found in stills of the scene.
The 18-inch model of King Kong was made from a metal mesh skeleton, a mixture of rubber and foam for the muscle structure and rabbit fur for his hair.
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National Film Registry

King Kong

Released 1933
Inducted 1991
(Sound)




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Also directed by Merian C. Cooper


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Also produced by David O. Selznick




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Also released in 1933




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