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Guess Who's Coming to Dinner Overview:

Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (1967) was a Drama - Romance Film directed by Stanley Kramer and produced by Stanley Kramer and George Glass.

Academy Awards 1967 --- Ceremony Number 40 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best ActorSpencer TracyNominated
Best Supporting ActorCecil KellawayNominated
Best ActressKatharine HepburnWon
Best Supporting ActressBeah RichardsNominated
Best Art DirectionArt Direction: Robert Clatworthy; Set Decoration: Frank TuttleNominated
Best DirectorStanley KramerNominated
Best Film EditingRobert C. JonesNominated
Best Music - ScoringDeVolNominated
Best PictureStanley Kramer, ProducerNominated
Best WritingWilliam RoseWon
.

BlogHub Articles:

GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER? (1967): Love, Controversy, and Progress

By Margaret Perry on Oct 28, 2012 From The Great Katharine Hepburn

GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER? (1967): Love, Controversy, and Progress Turner Classic Movies will conclude their month of Spencer Tracy today, 29 October, with an evening of the four films he made with director Stanley Kramer. GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER (1967) was Spencer Tracy's final film an... Read full article


GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER? (1967): Love, Controversy, and Progress

By Margaret Perry on Oct 28, 2012 From The Great Katharine Hepburn

GUESS WHO'S COMING TO DINNER? (1967): Love, Controversy, and Progress Labels: 1960s, Beah Richards, Civil Rights, Isabel Sanford, Kathy Houghton, Sidney Poitier, Spencer Tracy, Stanley Kramer, TCM Turner Classic Movies will conclude their month of Spencer Tracy today, 29 October, wit... Read full article


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Quotes from

Matt Drayton: Now Mr. Prentice, clearly a most reasonable man, says he has no wish to offend me but wants to know if I'm some kind of a *nut*. And Mrs. Prentice says that like her husband I'm a burned-out old shell of a man who cannot even remember what it's like to love a woman the way her son loves my daughter. And strange as it seems, that's the first statement made to me all day with which I am prepared to take issue... cause I think you're wrong, you're as wrong as you can be. I admit that I hadn't considered it, hadn't even thought about it, but I know exactly how he feels about her and there is nothing, absolutely nothing that you son feels for my daughter that I didn't feel for Christina. Old- yes. Burned-out- certainly, but I can tell you the memories are still there- clear, intact, indestructible, and they'll be there if I live to be 110. Where John made his mistake I think was in attaching so much importance to what her mother and I might think... because in the final analysis it doesn't matter a damn what we think. The only thing that matters is what they feel, and how much they feel, for each other. And if it's half of what we felt- that's everything. As for you two and the problems you're going to have, they seem almost unimaginable, but you'll have no problem with me, and I think when Christina and I and your mother have some time to work on him you'll have no problem with your father, John. But you do know, I'm sure you know, what you're up against. There'll be 100 million people right here in this country who will be shocked and offended and appalled and the two of you will just have to ride that out, maybe every day for the rest of your lives. You could try to ignore those people, or you could feel sorry for them and for their prejudice and their bigotry and their blind hatred and stupid fears, but where necessary you'll just have to cling tight to each other and say "screw all those people"! Anybody could make a case, a hell of a good case, against your getting married. The arguments are so obvious that nobody has to make them. But you're two wonderful people who happened to fall in love and happened to have a pigmentation problem, and I think that now, no matter what kind of a case some bastard could make against your getting married, there would be only one thing worse, and that would be if - knowing what you two are and knowing what you two have and knowing what you two feel- you didn't get married. Well, Tillie, when the hell are we gonna get some dinner?


Tillie: I don't care to see a member of my own race getting above himself.


Christina Drayton: [to her assistant, Hilary, in the driveway] Now I have some instructions for you. I want you to go straight back to the gallery - Start your motor - When you get to the gallery tell Jennifer that she will be looking after things temporarily, she's to give me a ring if there's anything she can't deal with herself. Then go into the office, and make out a check, for "cash," for the sum of $5,000. Then carefully, but carefully Hilary, remove absolutely everything that might subsequently remind me that you had ever been there, including that yellow thing with the blue bulbs which you have such an affection for. Then take the check, for $5,000, which I feel you deserve, and get - permanently - lost. It's not that I don't want to know you, Hilary - although I don't - it's just that I'm afraid we're not really the sort of people that you can afford to be associated with.
[Hilary opens her mouth to say something]
Christina Drayton: Don't speak, Hilary, just... go.


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Facts about

In some shots you can clearly see Katharine Hepburn's head and hands trembling because of her hereditary shake, e.g., when she is pouring a drink for the Reverend right after his second arrival.
Katharine Hepburn's character's daughter is played by Hepburn's actual niece Katharine Houghton
Mr Prentice (Roy Glenn) says to his son John (Sidney Poitier) "In 16 or 17 states you'll be breaking the law. You'll be criminals." By the time people saw the movie this was no longer true. On June 12th, 1967, the US Supreme Court in the case Loving v Virginia declared anti-miscegenation laws unconstitutional.
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Best Actress Oscar 1967






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Also directed by Stanley Kramer




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Also produced by Stanley Kramer




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Also released in 1967




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