Dr. Strangelove: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb Overview:

Dr. Strangelove: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) was a Comedy - Drama Film directed by Stanley Kubrick and produced by Stanley Kubrick, Victor Lyndon and Leon Minoff.

The film was based on the novel Red Alert written by Peter George published in 1958.

Dr. Strangelove: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb was inducted into the National Film Registry in 1989.

Academy Awards 1964 --- Ceremony Number 37 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best ActorPeter SellersNominated
Best DirectorStanley KubrickNominated
Best PictureStanley Kubrick, ProducerNominated
Best WritingStanley Kubrick, Peter George, Terry SouthernNominated
.

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Quotes from

Group Capt. Lionel Mandrake: Do I look all rancid and clotted? You look at me, Jack. Eh? Look, eh? And I drink a lot of water, you know. I'm what you might call a water man, Jack - that's what I am. And I can swear to you, my boy, swear to you, that there's nothing wrong with my bodily fluids. Not a thing, Jackie.


Group Capt. Lionel Mandrake: If you don't put that gun away and stop this stupid nonsense, the court of Enquiry on this'll give you such a pranging, you'll be lucky if you end up wearing the uniform of a bloody toilet attendant.


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Facts about

According to Christiane Kubrick in her 2002 book "Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures," her husband Stanley Kubrick often played chess with George C. Scott on the set between setups. Kubrick, renowned as a master-level chess player who used to hustle other players in his youth in New York City, outclassed Scott as a player and easily beat him, which had the effect of winning Scott's admiration for the director and keeping the famously volatile actor (who was only a few months younger than Kubrick) focused during the down-time.
In the War Room scenes, General Turgidsen and the Air Force general officer seated next to him both wear wings of the lowest Air Force aeronautical rating ("pilot"). Although it is possible nowadays, in the era in which the film was made it is highly unlikely that a senior Air Force general officer (and the apparent Air Force Chief of Staff) would have any aeronautical rating lower than "command pilot" (wings with a star and a wreath), which required 15 years as a rated pilot and a minimum of 3,000 flight hours.
The ending in the novel was similar to the novel and movie Fail-Safe. Author Peter George detested the conversion of his book to a satire, but wrote a tie-in novelization of the film anyway.
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Best Picture Oscar 1964






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National Film Registry

Dr. Strangelove: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb

Released 1964
Inducted 1989
(Sound)




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