Wendell Corey Overview:

Actor, Wendell Corey, was born on Mar 20, 1914 in Dracut, MA. Corey died at the age of 54 on Nov 8, 1968 in Woodland Hills, Los Angeles and was laid to rest in Washington Cemetery in Washington, Berkshire County, MA.

HONORS and AWARDS:

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He was honored with one star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in the category of Television.

BlogHub Articles:

Barbara Stanwyck and in “The File on Thelma Jordon”

By Stephen Reginald on May 15, 2020 From Classic Movie Man

Barbara Stanwyck and in “The File on Thelma Jordon” The File on Thelma Jordon (1950) is a film noir directed by Robert Siodmak, produced by Hal B. Walis, and starring Barbara Stanwyck and . One evening Thelma Jordon (Stanwyck) shows up at the district att... Read full article


Day Eight of Noirvember: Remembering

By shadowsandsatin on Nov 8, 2016 From Shadows and Satin

Far too many of our classic film stars shuffled off this mortal coil too soon. One of these was film noir veteran , who died at the age of 54 on today?s date in 1968. Renowned for his versatility, Corey appeared in only 40 films during a span of 22 years, but these included such gems as... Read full article


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Wendell Corey Quotes:

Lisa: You can't ignore the wife dissapearing, and the trunk, and the jewelery.
Lt. Doyle: I checked the railroad station. Yesterday at 6:20 am, he bought a ticket. Ten minutes later, he put his wife on a train. Destination: Meritsville. I asure you, the witnesses are that deep.
Lisa: That might have been a woman, but it couldn't have been Mrs. Thorwald. That jewelery...
Lt. Doyle: Look, Miss Fremont, that feminine intuition stuff sells magazines, but in real life it's still a fairy tale. I don't know how many times I chased down leads based on women's intuition.


Jeff: What do you need as evidence? Bloody footprints leading up to his door?
Lt. Doyle: One thing I don't need is heckling. You called me and asked for help. Now you're behaving like a taxpayer.
Jeff: You know by tomorrow morning, there may not be any evidence left in that apartment, you know that?
Lt. Doyle: A detective's worst nightmare.


Maj. Sam Moulton: [Addressing the jury, presenting the closing arguments for the prosecution] Gentlemen, in answer to Col Wasnick's moving plea, I should like to say that, while in some instances society may seem to be responsible for an individual criminal and his crime, this does not release society of the further responsibility of bringing the criminal to justice. For to collaborate with the enemy in time of war is a crime. It does to a country exactly what murder does to an individual. The defense has only one legal argument - an argument which attracts both the public and the press - the "breaking point." A point which most certainly exists. But gentlemen, in this case, the deeds are clear. The duress has been described. And by the accused's own admission, no breaking point was reached. Captain Hall, an officer responsible for command, collaborated with the enemy. He attempted to persuade his country's troops to surrender in the field. He was willing to inform on fellow prisoners. He tried to influence others to collaborate with him. He set aside the Army's simple rule for "name, rank, and serial number" - and in so doing, opened himself to the enemy. If you find Capt. Hall innocent of collaboration, then you find all those other Americans who refused to collaborate guilty of stupidity. You must find on the evidence that Capt. Hall committed the offenses as charged.


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Wendell Corey on the
Hollywood Walk of Fame



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Wendell Corey Facts
Had four children: son Jonathan, and daughters Robin, Jennifer and Bonnie Alice.

Son of actor Milton R. Corey Sr..

President of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences from 1961 to 1963

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