Robert Walker Overview:

Legendary actor, Robert Walker, was born Robert Hudson Walker on Oct 13, 1918 in Salt Lake City, UT. Walker died at the age of 32 on Aug 28, 1951 in Los Angeles, CA .

HONORS and AWARDS:

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Although Walker was nominated for one Oscar, he never won a competitive Academy Award.

Academy Awards

YearAwardFilm nameRoleResult
2003Best Animated FeatureBrother Bear (2003)N/ANominated
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He was honored with one star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in the category of Motion Pictures.

BlogHub Articles:

Warner Archive: Brian Donlevy, and the True Story of the Atomic Bomb

By KC on Nov 2, 2015 From Classic Movies

This is the story of how the atom bomb was developed--with allowances for dramatic effect and national security of course. A triumph of science which led to unfathomable destruction. MGM faced a delicate task in telling this story. As expected, it contains a heavy dose of propaganda, but the tale i... Read full article


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Robert Walker Quotes:

Guy Haines: You crazy maniac! Would you please get out of here and leave me alone?
Bruno Anthony: But Guy... I like you.
[offended, Guy punches Bruno in the face]


Alice Maybery: Sometimes when a girl dates a soldier she isn't only thinking of herself. She knows he's alone and far away from home and no one to talk to and... What are you staring at?
Corporal Joe Allen: You've got brown eyes.


Doorman: Is this the place, monsieur?
Jimmy Dobson: Oui, oui.
Doorman: Will monsieur stay long in zis establishment?
Jimmy Dobson: Capistrano.


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Best Animated Feature Oscar 2003



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Robert Walker Facts
Was the original choice for the male lead in Meet Me in St. Louis (1944). It eventually went to Tom Drake, despite protests from Judy Garland.

He was born in Salt Lake City the night the "Big Fire" swept through the city. His father was the city editor of the "Deseret News"; and after a weary night of reporting on the blaze, he finally had the chance to put in a call to the hospital to learn of his son's birth. The next morning when he told his three other sons about their new brother, they were unimpressed. They had been up all night watching the fire, and another brother seemed much less interesting.

His performance as Bruno Anthony in Strangers on a Train (1951) is ranked #86 on Premiere Magazine's 100 Greatest Performances of All Time (2006).

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