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Eddie Cantor Overview:

Legendary actor, Eddie Cantor, was born Israel Iskowitz on Jan 31, 1892 in New York City, NY. Cantor died at the age of 72 on Oct 10, 1964 in Beverly Hills, CA and was laid to rest in Hillside Memorial Park Cemetery in Culver City, CA.

HONORS and AWARDS:

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He was honored with three stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in the categories of Television, Motion Pictures and Radio. Eddie Cantor's handprints and footprints were 'set in stone' at Grauman's Chinese Theater during imprint ceremony #20 on Mar 9, 1932. In addition, Cantor was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame . Cantor was never nominated for an Academy Award. However he won one Honorary Award in 1956 for distinguished service to the film industry .

BlogHub Articles:

The Many Sides of : Five Anecdotes

By Annmarie Gatti on Sep 21, 2016 From Classic Movie Hub Blog

The Many Sides of … Eddie making his trademark pop-eyed expression According to writer H.L. Mencken, ?s work in the 1930s did more to pull America out of the Great Depression than all government measures combined. He was appropriately nicknamed the Apostle of Pep. More ... Read full article


Warner Archive: 4-Film Collection

By KC on Jul 13, 2015 From Classic Movies

In a new collection from Warner Archive, four films produced by Samuel Goldwyn offer a glimpse into some of the popular comedian's best cinematic offerings. Palmy Days (1931), The Kid From Spain (1932), Roman Scandals (1933) and Strike Me Pink (1936) were an extension of the star's alre... Read full article


Musical Monday: The Story (1953)

on May 11, 2015 From Comet Over Hollywood

It?s no secret that the Hollywood Comet loves musicals. In 2010, I revealed I had seen 400 movie musicals over the course of eight years. Now that number is over 500. To celebrate and share this musical love, here is my weekly feature about musicals. This week?s musical: ? Story? ?Musica... Read full article


CMBA Forgotten Stars Blogathon:

By Aurora on Oct 27, 2014 From Once Upon a Screen

On Saturday, October 30, 1937 was honored with a testimonial dinner at the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles. ?The event, which was broadcast by the Columbia Broadcasting System was in celebration of Cantor’s 25th anniversary as a star. ?In attendance were the Postmaster-General, Ja... Read full article


Monday Serenade: in Whoopee! (1930)

By KC on Jun 14, 2010 From Classic Movies

I was so accustomed to the Nina Simone version of My Baby Just Cares for Me, that it stunned me when I first saw singing the tune in Whoopee! (1930). Cantor's performance has a lot of zing, and it's so charming. I definitely have room for both versions in my affections.... Read full article


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Eddie Cantor Quotes:

Dot Clark: I'm your mother, Junior.
Eddie Wilson Jr.: You are my mother?
Dot Clark: That's right.
Eddie Wilson Jr.: How old are you, Mommy?
Dot Clark: 19.
Eddie Wilson Jr.: 19?
Dot Clark: That's right.
Eddie Wilson Jr.: I'm 25 and you're 19. Maybe I'm YOUR mother.


Eddie Wilson Jr.: I wonder what the doctor said to your father when you were born.
Princess Fanya: Why bring that up?
Eddie Wilson Jr.: That's just what I thought.


[last lines]
Henry Williams: That's all there is!


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Featuring
(1944)
Thu. 16 May. 08:00 PM EST

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Also an Aquarius






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Honorary Award Oscar 1956


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Grauman's Imprints

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Eddie Cantor on the
Hollywood Walk of Fame





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Eddie Cantor Facts
Eddie Cantor is a recurring character on HBO's series Boardwalk Empire, where he is played by Stephen DeRosa. He appeared in three episodes of the show's first season.

He invented the name "March of Dimes" for the donation campaigns of the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (polio), a play on the "March of Time" newsreels. He began the first campaign on his own radio show in January 1938, asking people to mail a dime to the nation's most famous polio victim, President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Other entertainers joined in the appeal via their own shows, and the White House mail room was deluged with 2,680,000 dimes.

At one time, when the rights to The Wizard of Oz (1939) were owned by Samuel Goldwyn, Cantor was considered for the role of the Scarecrow. Goldwyn eventually sold the rights to Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.

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Radio Hall of Fame

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