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The Bride of Frankenstein (1935, James Whale)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Sep 3, 2014

For The Bride of Frankenstein, director Whale takes a contradictory approach. It's either more is more, or less is less. More music, all the time. Franz Waxman's frequently playful music rarely fits its scenes, unless Whale is going for a melodramatic farce, which he really doesn't s read more

The Old Dark House (1932, James Whale)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Aug 27, 2014

The Old Dark House is a strange film about strange people doing strange things. Director Whale and screenwriter Benn W. Levy rarely let the film get a set tone–unless one counts the consistent mix of comedy and horror. It’s not straight comedy; the comic elements tend to be either absur read more

Mini Tribute: James Whale at Work

Classic Movie Hub Blog Posted by Annmarie Gatti on Jul 22, 2014

  Born July 22, 1889 Director James Whale! James Whale directed over 20 feature films from 1930 through 1941, most notably three iconic horror classics:¬†Frankenstein (1931), The Invisible Man (1933) and The Bride of Frankenstein (1935). He also directed the 1932 Boris Karloff horror flick The read more

10 Classic Movies Directed by James Whale

Virtual Virago Posted by Jennifer Garlen on Jul 22, 2014

Born on July 22, 1889, the English director James Whale stands with Tod Browning as one of the most important developers of the 1930s horror genre. Both directors worked to give the iconic Universal horrors their sense of style, but Whale set the bar particularly high with his combination of terror read more

10 Classic Movies Directed by James Whale

Virtual Virago Posted by Jennifer Garlen on Jul 22, 2014

Born on July 22, 1889, the English director James Whale stands with Tod Browning as one of the most important developers of the 1930s horror genre. Both directors worked to give the iconic Universal horrors their sense of style, but Whale set the bar particularly high with his combination of terror read more

The Invisible Man (1933, James Whale)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on May 4, 2014

The Invisible Man is a filmmaking marvel. First off, R.C. Sherriff’s screenplay sets things up speedily and without much exposition. The film introduces Claude Rains’s character through everyone else’s point of view–first the strangers he meets, then his familiars–all read more

Frankenstein (1931, James Whale), the digest version

The Stop Button Posted by on Feb 26, 2013

The eight millimeter digest version of Frankenstein removes all but three main characters. Colin Clive gets the most time, though loses all subplots and character, with Boris Karloff probably coming in second. It’s odd to watch Frankenstein and have the monster make so little impression but i read more

Remember Last Night? (1935, James Whale)

The Stop Button Posted by on Feb 10, 2010

I wish I knew if Remember Last Night? is supposed to be a knock-off of The Thin Man or if it’s just a highly coincidental release, coming a year later, with a similarly intoxicated, ritzy couple solving crimes as they get more intoxicated (Robert Young and Constance Cummings play the couple i read more

Frankenstein (1931, James Whale)

The Stop Button Posted by on Sep 23, 2008

I’m trying to imagine how Frankenstein looks on the big screen–maybe on one the size of Radio City Music Hall; James Whale fills the screen upward. He directs the viewer’s attention always up, starting with the first scenes in the tower laboratory. The frames are obviously filled read more

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