Classic Movie Hub (CMH)
Welcome to BlogHub: the Best in Veteran and Emerging Classic Movie Blogs
You can rate and share your favorite classic movie posts here.
12345678910

Encore podcast: "The Andy Griffith Show" and How It Grew

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on May 3, 2019

"The Andy Griffith Show” is Griffith’s best work — certainly his most personal. It was never out of TV’s Top 10 programs for its entire eight-season run, and it inspired a spinoff series, a TV movies and several reunion specials. Fifty years after it left the air, the reruns read more

Encore podcast: A Short History of Ridiculous Sponsor Interference

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Apr 26, 2019

For almost as long as there has been broadcasting, there has been commercial sponsorship. But from the 1930s through the 1960s, sponsors had an unusual amount of power because, through advertising agencies, they owned entire blocks of time on the program schedule and produced their own shows. In thi read more

Raymond Burr's Secrets and Lies

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Apr 19, 2019

When Raymond Burr died in 1993, he was eulogized around the world as the star of "Perry Mason" and "Ironside." But the obituaries were notable for what they didn't say as much as for what they did say. None of them mentioned that Burr was gay -- he had been closeted all his life. And most of them me read more

Encore podcast: Ed Sullivan, American Gatekeeper

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Apr 5, 2019

In 1948, Ed Sullivan began hosting a weekly variety series on CBS-TV. His background as a newspaper columnist served him well — he had an unerring instinct for what people wanted to see, and he used his unique power to become an influential American gatekeeper for most of the 1950s and ’ read more

Encore podcast: The 1960s -- How We Played

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Mar 29, 2019

David Inman and his brother Steve take another trip down memory lane to recall the toys they played with as kids, from G.I. Joes fully equipped for nuclear war to electric football games, which were basically vibrating pieces of sheet metal. There are also special guest appearances by Hot Wheels, Mr read more

Encore podcast -- 1952: The 60-Second Election

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Mar 22, 2019

In 1952, Republican Dwight Eisenhower squared off against Democrat Adlai Stevenson in the presidential election. Eisenhower, who had been commander of allied forces in Europe during World War II, was enormously popular but not much of a public speaker. So a combination of talents from America’ read more

Encore podcast: James Cagney's Final Act(ing)

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Mar 15, 2019

After a thirty-year Hollywood career, James Cagney made what he thought would be his final film in 1961 -- a comedy directed by Billy Wilder called "One Two Three." Cagney then retired, spending his time between two farms he owned -- one on Martha's Vineyard and one in upstate New York. But Cagney g read more

Encore podcast: The Marlon Brando-Wally Cox Connection

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Mar 8, 2019

One man was one of the most iconoclastic and controversial actors of the 20th century -- the other was the voice of Underdog on a Saturday morning cartoon show. But once they met on an Illinois schoolyard, nine-year-olds Marlon Brando and Wally Cox became lifelong friends -- and even lovers, accordi read more

Variations on a Theme Song (1966 Edition)

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Mar 1, 2019

In the immortal tradition of cave people banging on rocks and skulls and strolling troubadours of the Middle Ages, there is also the TV theme song. We take a look at the state of the theme in 1966, which featured songs with one-word lyrics ("Batman") and pop hits ("Secret Agent") as well as songs th read more

Encore podcast: A Very Short History of TV Shows with Very Short Histories

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Feb 22, 2019

What can you say about a TV show that dies after just one episode? We can think of a few things. Here’s a look at some of the most notorious examples, including a show that forced Jackie Gleason to apologize to America, a “Laugh-In” ripoff that was cancelled midway through its only read more

Silverman's Travels

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Feb 15, 2019

If you were watching American network TV in the 1970s and early 1980s, what you were watching had probably been touched by Fred Silverman. Over a 20-year period, Silverman had an unprecedented run as chief programmer of all three networks -- CBS, ABC and NBC. His successful programming choices led t read more

What We Laughed At

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Feb 2, 2019

My brother Steve and I sit down and talk about the comedians we enjoyed as kids, mostly on "The Ed Sullivan Show," like Jackie Vernon, Myron Cohen and Henny Youngman. We also talk about discovering "new" comics like Richard Pryor and George Carlin and more contemporary comics such as Brian Regan and read more

Sid Caesar and His Demons

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Jan 18, 2019

Sid Caesar is one of the comic giants of 1950s TV, but he was also plagued by anxiety, depression, guilt and an explosive temper. In the early 1980s he came to my hometown of Louisville to perform at a dinner theatre, and I reviewed the show. I didn't know it then, but he was in the midst of a battl read more

Encore Podcast: Big Stars + Small Screen = Tiny Audiences

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Dec 21, 2018

The big TV story in the fall of 1971 was that movie stars were coming to the tube, including James Stewart, Henry Fonda, Shirley MacLaine, Glenn Ford, Anthony Quinn, Rock Hudson and Tony Curtis, among others. Many of them turned to TV because movie roles were growing scarce, and for lucrative payche read more

The Miracle of "A Charlie Brown Christmas"

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Dec 14, 2018

"A Charlie Brown Christmas" wasn't intentionally created to be timeless, but because of its simplicity and sincerity, timeless it is. Miraculously, it avoids every cliche associated with children's animation and is a perfect blending of music, words and images that clearly conveys one man's vision a read more

Sonny and Cher's Long, Strange TV Trip

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Dec 7, 2018

The career odyssey of Sonny and Cher began in a recording studio, led to an abortive attempt at movies and finally to TV, where their comedy-variety show was one of the most popular of the 1970s. At the same time, it shaped Cher as a showbiz and fashion icon and led to the breakup of their marriage read more

Encore podcast: "The Hopalong Cassidy Magical Marketing Machine"

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Nov 30, 2018

In 1948, William Boyd made a large bet on television, and on demographics. He had an idea that the first wave of the baby boomers — kids born to newly affluent parents — would be a large and untapped audience for the 66 “Hopalong Cassidy” movie westerns he’d starred in, read more

Seven and a Half Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About "The Dick Van Dyke Show"

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Nov 23, 2018

It's been over 50 years since "The Dick Van Dyke Show" ended its run, but the show has really never left the airwaves -- its blend of sophisticated and slapstick humor set a sitcom standard that has rarely been matched. What else is there to say? We attempt a few things, including which cast member read more

The Marlon Brando-Wally Cox Connection

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Nov 3, 2018

  One man was one of the most iconoclastic and controversial actors of the 20th century -- the other was the voice of Underdog on a Saturday morning cartoon show. But once they met on an Illinois schoolyard, nine-year-olds Marlon Brando and Wally Cox became lifelong friends -- and even lovers, read more

Encore Podcast: "Liz and Dick and Lucy and the Ring"

The Man on the Flying Trapeze Posted by David on Oct 19, 2018

In 1969, Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton were arguably the world's most famous married couple, and they became even more well known when Burton bought his wife a 69-carat diamond ring that cost over a million dollars. At a Hollywood party, their paths crossed with Lucille Ball and an unlikely id read more
12345678910

error