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'Forbidden Hollywood': See the films, buy the book

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 23, 2019

That's Carole Lombard, playing a former streetwalker trying to go straight, with cabbie Pat O'Brien in "Virtue" (1932). It's one of Lombard's toughest characters, typical for films made in what now is known as the pre-Code era. After the movie industry clamped down on the Production Code in mid-1934 read more

At first you don't succeed, so in 2021...

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 22, 2019

If you were planning to send a letter on behalf of the campaign for Carole Lombard to receive a commemorative United States postage stamp (https://carole-and-co.livejournal.com/987853.html), hold off on it. In fact, hold off for more than two years; here's why.Brian Lee Anderson, who's engineered th read more

Clippings for sale...twice

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 21, 2019

A happy Easter (what's left of it, anyway) from Carole Lombard, as we've run across two sets of clippings of her now available on eBay.This batch of 23 pics is available for $44.96, although you can make an offer. Find out more about it, and the conditions attached, at https://www.ebay.com/itm/Carol read more

'Confessions' about a magazine cover that isn't

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 20, 2019

And this has nothing to do with Carole Lombard's final film for Paramount (titled "True Confession," no "s"), which put her on the cover in February 1938......and also released a tie-in seen above. Rather, this deals with the April 1936 issue where Carole graced the cover (https://carole-and-co.live read more

Some 'Big News' about a Lombard still

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 19, 2019

Of the three talking feature films Carole Lombard made for Pathe (while she was billed as Carol Lombard), "Big News" is probably the least known. A shame, because it's directed by Gregory La Cava some seven years before he and Lombard would reteam for the brilliant "My Man Godfrey." Moreover, it's t read more

So, did Carole make "chick flicks"?

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 18, 2019

Carole Lombard appeared in several dozen films during her relatively brief life -- but if today's terminology had been used then, would any of them have been labeled "chick flicks"?The term has come to refer to films designed primarily for female audiences, usually light in tone or comedic in nature read more

Carole & Coop...and 'Shadoplay'

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 17, 2019

"Now And Forever," issued in late summer 1934, marked Carole Lombard's second and last collaboration with Gary Cooper. The pair thus was placed on the cover of that September's Shadoplay, Photoplay's low-budget cousin. The cover is the only illustration provided (according to the seller, three pages read more

Of Netflix and the Egyptian

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 16, 2019

I've never seen a photo of Carole Lombard at the fabled Egyptian Theater on Hollywood Boulevard, but we do have this image of one of her films playing there, "True Confession" in late 1937. Perhaps she was at its premiere. But since the Sid Grauman-built venue opened in 1922, it's highly likely Lomb read more

Back in circulation for beaucoup bucks

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 15, 2019

Here's Carole Lombard, "Paramount star," as part of a display board for Max Factor lipstick. But in the 1930s, stars' agents didn't make deals to advertise products -- stars' studios did. This was evident in a contract Lombard signed with Factor on July 13, 1932:As you can see, Paramount was clearly read more

'Modern' -- and wrinkled

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 14, 2019

Carole Lombard worked with Paul Lukas in "No One Man," released in early 1932. More than three years later, they reunited -- not for a movie, but for tennis with noted character actor Eric Blore at the Racquet Club in Palm Springs, a photo used in 1935 for Dell Publishing's Modern magazine:It belong read more

An intimate view of Clark and Carole's wedding

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 13, 2019

The story of Clark Gable and Carole Lombard's 1939 "honeymoon" in Oatman, Ariz., long has been exposed as so much myth, but one good by-product of it came in March 1989 -- the 50th anniversary of their wedding in Kingman, Ariz.The widow of Otto Winkler, the MGM publicist who died with Lombard and he read more

Pretty sexy Pathe pics

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 12, 2019

We've frequently mentioned that the first Carole Lombard photographer to play up her sensuality was Pathe's William E. Thomas. In the late 1920s and her early 20s, Thomas captured Carol -- remember, at Pathe, Lombard's first name had no "e" -- as her sexuality began to blossom.Five examples of Thoma read more

Stylish, from whatever year

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 11, 2019

Here's Carole Lombard from relatively late in her Paramount career, p1202-1385. We know that because of the p1202 number (seemingly from 1936) and a date at the bottom -- yet that date is 1938, by which time she had left the studio:Moreover, whomever inscribed this on the back wrote "Now And Forever read more

Learn about Lubitsch, via a Vulture

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 10, 2019

There they are, my favorite classic Hollywood actress and director, Carole Lombard and Ernst Lubitsch, in preparation for "To Be Or Not To Be" on the United Artists lot in 1941.While many fans of the Golden Age are aware of Lubitsch and his "touch," there still are numerous movie buffs unfamiliar wi read more

Drink in the Derby

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 9, 2019

Who's alongside Carole Lombard and Clark Gable at this 1937 Hearst Castle costume party? None other than two-time Lombard co-star Gail Patrick ("Rumba" and "My Man Godfrey") and her husband, Los Angeles restauranteur Robert Cobb of Brown Derby fame. (Cobb later owned the Pacific Coast League's Holly read more

A Francis tentet? Oh, Kay!

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 8, 2019

Carole Lombard is shown with Kay Francis in one of the two films they made together, "Ladies' Man" (Paramount, 1931). Tomorrow, Turner Classic Movies in the U.S. is showing 10 of Kay's films, although neither "Ladies' Man" nor her other collaboration with Carole ("In Name Only," RKO, 1939) is among read more

Form-fitting fashion

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 7, 2019

This is Carole Lombard in Paramount p1202-649, taken during 1933 when she was better known for what she wore (and how she wore it) than for any inherent acting ability (although glimpses of the greatness to come already were evident in films such as "Virtue," "No More Orchids" and "No Man Of Her Own read more

Anyone going to the TCMFF?

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 6, 2019

The 10th Turner Classic Movies Film Festival is set for next week, about ten blocks east of the Hollywood Boulevard house Carole Lombard called home in the mid-1930s.While I'm not officially attending this year's festival, I plan to soak in the atmosphere and meet people during this annual celebrati read more

A very fine vintage Coop and Carole

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 5, 2019

Carole Lombard and Gary Cooper's first co-starring assignment, Paramount's 1931 drama "I Take This Woman," is celebrated in this stunning vintage still, 8" x 10" and in very fine condition. Its back shows several stamps revealing its status:Want to add this image of two legends to your collection? I read more

Saluting a pair who preserved film history

Carole & Co. Posted by carole_and_co on Apr 4, 2019

For decades, the 1931 Carole Lombard-Gary Cooper drama "I Take This Woman" had been out of circulation and feared lost. But a 16mm print was found in the late 1990s, followed by one in 35mm. Both have been rehabilitated and exhibited, enabling fans of both iconic performers to see them in action.Two read more
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