Classic Movie Hub (CMH)


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I'll Be Seeing You

I'll Be Seeing You

Mary Marshall: [Trying on the dress in the dressing room] How much is this dress?
Saleslady: Sixty-nine dollars.
Mary Marshall: Oh? Would you take the tag off, please?
[Handing her some money]
Mary Marshall: Look, here's thirty dollars. And when my aunt asks you the price, will you tell her that it's thirty-nine instead of sixty-nine dollars?
Saleslady: It's a bargain.
Mary Marshall: Thank you.
Mrs. Marshall: [Saleslady leaves the dressing room, and joins Mrs. Marshall outside] Miss, how much was that dress?
Saleslady: Thirty-nine dollars.
Mrs. Marshall: Look, I'll give you twenty dollars. When I ask you again, how much it was, you tell me it's nineteen dollars.
Mary Marshall: [coming out of the dressing room] Do you like it?
Mrs. Marshall: Oh, it's darling on you.
Mary Marshall: Isn't it sweet?
Mrs. Marshall: It was made for you. Um, Miss, how much is this dress?
Saleslady: Nineteen dollars.
Mrs. Marshall: Oh, that's a wonderful buy.
[Mary realizes what happened and laughs]


--Spring Byington (as Mrs. Marshall) in I'll Be Seeing You

It's Love I'm After

It's Love I'm After

Marcia West: This Aunt Ella Paisley!
Aunt Ella: [Grabbing his hand] Oh, Mr. Underwood! That hand! That Hand! That love line, and that mound of Venus. You'll be married once. Heaven help the poor girl, the lucky thing.


--Spring Byington (as Aunt Ella) in It's Love I'm After

I'll Be Seeing You

I'll Be Seeing You

Zachary Morgan: [Mrs. Marshall comes in with a flaming plum pudding] I never could figure out why the pudding never gets burned.
Mary Marshall: I've never been able to figure that out either. Must be the alcohol in the brandy.
Zachary Morgan: I think.
Mr. Marshall: Personally, I think it's a shame to burn good brandy. That quart I brought home last week was imported cognac.
Mrs. Marshall: Oh, don't worry, Henry, I didn't burn up the whole quart.
Barbara Marshall: Oh, I wouldn't trust Mom with it, Dad.
Mr. Marshall: Maybe you're right. Remember last year, how Mom got going on just a glass of sherry?
Mrs. Marshall: Now I'm not going to listen to that again!
Barbara Marshall: You may not believe this about your dear Aunt Sarah, but last year she got high as a kite.
Zachary Morgan: If they're trying to drag out a family skeleton, Mrs. Marshall, I won't listen to them.
Mrs. Marshall: Oh, it's just one of those little things that happen, people start exaggerating.
Mr. Marshall: Exaggerate, my eye! It's as true as I sit here. Last year, Mother and I had a glass of sherry to bring in the new year. And then we went to a little gathering, all the way across town, it was. Mother had her skirt on backwards!
Mrs. Marshall: See here, Henry, if you're in such good voice, how about a Christmas carol?


--Spring Byington (as Mrs. Marshall) in I'll Be Seeing You

Dragonwyck

Dragonwyck

Magda: [to Miranda] You mustn't take me seriously, Miss. No one ever does.


--Spring Byington (as Magda) in Dragonwyck

Dragonwyck

Dragonwyck

Magda: You like it here?
Miranda Wells: [defensive] Of *course* I do!
Magda: Of course you do. You like being waited on - I could see tonight it was your first time. You like peaches out of season. You like the feel of silk sheets against your young body... And one day you'll wish with all your heart you'd never come to Dragonwyck!


--Spring Byington (as Magda) in Dragonwyck


Faithful in My Fashion

Faithful in My Fashion

Miss Swanson: Don't they look nice together? I think people who look nice together *should* get married. It's so beneficial for the children.


--Spring Byington (as ) in Faithful in My Fashion

I'll Be Seeing You

I'll Be Seeing You

Mrs. Marshall: Oh, I understood, Mary. When Zach said he was a stranger, you felt as if the words were coming from your own lips.
Mr. Marshall: Might have happened to any girl. Could have been just Christmas sentiment. Good night, Mary.
Mary Marshall: Good night, Uncle Henry.
Mr. Marshall: Good night. Don't forget to turn out the lights, Sarah.
Mrs. Marshall: All right, dear. So don't worry about making a scene.
Mary Marshall: Well, I'm not worrying about that, Aunt Sarah. I was just wondering if I shouldn't tell him about me.
Mrs. Marshall: Oh, not for the world.
Mary Marshall: You don't think so?
Mrs. Marshall: Well, why?
Mary Marshall: Well, he trusts me, and it doesn't seem fair.
Mrs. Marshall: Oh, there's no reason for it, Mary. He'll only be here for a few days. He's lonely, and you're making things pleasant for him.
Mary Marshall: That's not the reason I'm seeing him, Aunt Sarah. Because I like him. I like him a lot.
Mrs. Marshall: Of course you do, dear, but it isn't as if you were going to marry him.
Mary Marshall: No. It's not as if I was going to marry him.
Mrs. Marshall: I didn't mean it like that, dear.
Mary Marshall: I know.
Mrs. Marshall: Have fun, Mary. See Zach everyday, if you like. Act like any other girl.
Mary Marshall: I try, Aunt Sarah, but I can't seem to make myself feel like any other girl. I just feel like me.
Mrs. Marshall: And that's pretty darn good. Now you have fun.


--Spring Byington (as Mrs. Marshall) in I'll Be Seeing You

I'll Be Seeing You

I'll Be Seeing You

Mrs. Marshall: You haven't changed, Mary. Not at all.
Mary Marshall: Thank you, Aunt Sarah. Oh, it's so good to be here.
Mrs. Marshall: I'm so glad to have you with us, dear. Awfully glad. Barbara, come on down! You can share Barbara's room.
Mary Marshall: Oh, dear, I don't want to disturb anybody. I, don't ...
Mrs. Marshall: Oh, nonsense. Barbara will love to have you. Here, for heaven's sake, give me your coat. Anyway, it's the guest room, or it was before Barbara was born. Besides, I think it would be a very good thing for Barbara. She's seventeen.
Mary Marshall: Seventeen?
Mrs. Marshall: And she's pretty, spoiled, and at an age, oh, you know. I think an older girl will be a very good thing for her right now. Like you. Yes, like you. Now, there's a million things to talk about, but first you want to wash up.
Barbara Marshall: [coming downstairs] Hello, Mary. I'm awfully glad to see you.
Mary Marshall: Hello, Barbara. Why, I never would have known you. She's grown into a beauty.
Barbara Marshall: Welcome home.
Mrs. Marshall: Take Mary up to your room, dear.
Barbara Marshall: Follow me, lady, to my boudoir. Although it's small, not much bigger than a cell. Oh, I'm sorry, Mary.
Mary Marshall: Look, there's just one thing. We all know that I've been in prison, and I'm going back in eight days. And there's no use pretending it isn't so. It just won't be any good unless everybody says what he thinks, and doesn't try to cover up.
Mrs. Marshall: Oh, you're a fine girl, Mary. Now go up and see your room.


--Spring Byington (as Mrs. Marshall) in I'll Be Seeing You

I'll Be Seeing You

I'll Be Seeing You

Mrs. Marshall: You must have been looking forward to it, Mary.
Mary Marshall: I was looking forward to seeing you, Aunt Sarah.
Mrs. Marshall: Oh, that's sweet of you, dear.
Mary Marshall: As a matter of fact, selfish. I've been doing a lot of thinking in the past three years, Aunt Sarah, and...
Mrs. Marshall: What sort of things were you thinking, Mary?
Mary Marshall: Coming out into the world and... Even coming here, I had a feeling that ...
Mrs. Marshall: Honey, you've got to stop being afraid. You've got to stop feeling that you're branded like people were in the old days. You've done something. You're paying your debt to society. Most people are willing to let it go at that.
Mary Marshall: I know, Aunt Sarah, but coming out into the world and seeing everybody in uniform, everybody doing something... I just don't belong. I don't fit in. And dreams that I've had for the future are just impossible.
Mrs. Marshall: Well, most dreams are, Mary. It's just the dreaming that counts. Nobody gets exactly what he wants out of life. One of the first things you learn is to make compromises with your dreams.
Mary Marshall: But I'm not talking about palaces and rainbows, Aunt Sarah. I'm talking about a home. A home like this with a kitchen and a stove and an icebox, and a husband, and a child.
Mrs. Marshall: Yes, I have all that. Yet I used to dream about palaces and rainbows.
Mary Marshall: But you're happy.
Mrs. Marshall: Of course. Because I didn't hold out for too much. I accepted what I thought was second best and made that do. Oh, it's something that everybody learns sooner or later. You have to get used to accepting what you think is second best, and then you find out it's first best after all.


--Spring Byington (as Mrs. Marshall) in I'll Be Seeing You

The Heavenly Body

The Heavenly Body

Nancy Potter: You talk as if astrology is something to be ashamed of, like witchcraft or being a Democrat.


--Spring Byington (as Nancy Potter) in The Heavenly Body

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