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The Wizard of Oz Overview:

The Wizard of Oz (1939) was a Adventure - Family Film directed by King Vidor and Mervyn LeRoy and produced by Mervyn LeRoy and Arthur Freed.

The film was based on the novel The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and also Musical written by L. Frank Baum published in 1900 (novel); Jan 20, 1903 - Oct 3, 1903 (play performed at Majestic Theatre, NY).

The Wizard of Oz was inducted into the National Film Registry in 1989.

Academy Awards 1939 --- Ceremony Number 12 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best Art DirectionCedric Gibbons, William A. HorningNominated
Best CinematographyHal RossonNominated
Best Music - ScoringHerbert StothartWon
Best Music - SongMusic by Harold Arlen; Lyrics by E. Y. HarburgWon
Best PictureMetro-Goldwyn-MayerNominated
.

BlogHub Articles:

Win Tickets to see “TCM Big Screen Classics: The Wizard of Oz 80th Anniversary” (Giveaway runs now through Jan 13)

By Annmarie Gatti on Jan 8, 2019 From Classic Movie Hub Blog

Win tickets to see “The Wizard of Oz” on the big screen! In Select Cinemas Nationwide Sun Jan 27, Tues Jan 29, Wed Jan 30 “Toto, I’ve a feeling we’re not in Kansas any more.” CMH continues into our 4th year of our partnership with Fathom Events - with the 1st of our 14 movie ticket givea... Read full article


Silent Sunday – The Wizard of Oz (1925)

By Michael on Jan 7, 2018 From Durnmoose Movie Musings

Since Sunday tends to be a day of quiet and reflection for many people, it seems an appropriate day to celebrate silent movies. But in keeping with the “day of rest” theme, I’m just going to post this without any commentary and just sit back and let you enjoy.... Read full article


The Wizard of Oz (1939, Victor Fleming)

By Andrew Wickliffe on Jun 8, 2017 From The Stop Button

By the time the door opens and Dorothy (Judy Garland) finds herself over the rainbow, The Wizard of Oz has already completed one full narrative arc and is starting another. The film opens with Garland in a crisis–she’s a teenage girl on a farm where no one has time for her (it’s a busy farm, after a... Read full article


Classic Movie Anecdote: The Wizard of Oz and “Over the Rainbow”

By Annmarie Gatti on Aug 25, 2016 From Classic Movie Hub Blog

Celebrating the Anniversary of The Wizard of Oz on August 25, 1939 with a Classic Movie Anecdote! The Wizard of Oz was released nationally in the US on this day in 1939. That said, I just wanted to share this fun little anecdote told by Meredith Ponedel, niece of Dottie Ponedel who was Judy Garland&... Read full article


The Tornado in The Wizard of Oz

By Amanda Garrett on Jun 18, 2016 From Old Hollywood Films

Today, I'm taking a behind the scenes look at the tornado scene in The Wizard of Oz (1939). This article is part of the Nature's Fury Blogathon hosted by Cinematic Catharsis. While the Gulf Coast has its hurricanes and California has its earthquakes, tornadoes are the Midwest's example of nat... Read full article


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Quotes from

Dorothy: Oh, Auntie Em - there's no place like home!


Scarecrow: Witch? Hmph, I'm not afraid of a witch. I'm not afraid of anything - except a lighted match.


The Wicked Witch of the West: All in good time, my little pretty, all in good time.


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Facts about

The film began its legendary run on network television on 3 November 1956, as an the series finale of the CBS anthology series Ford Star Jubilee. The broadcast was a smash, but the film was not shown on TV again until 1959. In a programming stroke of genius, it was decided to air it at an earlier hour (6:00 P.M., E.S.T.) as a Christmas season special - independent of any anthology packaging. This broadcast attracted an even wider audience, because children were able to watch, and from this moment on the film began airing annually on television. It was aired first on CBS (primarily in late winter), then on NBC (usually in mid-Spring, often on Easter Sunday), and then again on CBS, where it finished its network run of nearly 40 years in 1998, after which it was officially integrated into the Turner vault of motion pictures. (It now airs only on Turner-owned networks: WB, TNT, and most prominently Turner Classic Movies.)
George Cukor not only changed Judy Garland's physical appearance in the film to the way it looks in the finished version, but also modified the Scarecrow's makeup. Later, when Victor Fleming had been assigned to direct, Jack Haley began filming his first scene as the Tin Man, the scene in which Dorothy and the Scarecrow first discover him. Buddy Ebsen, who had been playing the Tin Man, had to back out because of an allergic reaction to his makeup, and never filmed this scene; he had only filmed scenes that take place in the second half of the film, after the four travelers have been to the Wash and Brush Up Co. at the Emerald City. Haley had been filming his first scene for three days before anyone realized that he had no "rust" on his "tin" costume, even though in the story he was supposed to have been standing rusted for an entire year. The rust was immediately applied to it.
The paint used that was finally used on the bricks for the "Yellow Brick Road" was standard industrial yellow paint that was obtained from a hardware store several blocks away from the studio.
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National Film Registry

The Wizard of Oz

Released 1939
Inducted 1989
(Sound)




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Also directed by Victor Fleming




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Also produced by Mervyn LeRoy




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