Daring Darleen Candlewick

The Third Man Overview:

The Third Man (1949) was a Film Noir - Mystery Film directed by Carol Reed and produced by Carol Reed, David O. Selznick, Alexander Korda and Hugh Perceval.

The film was based on the novel of the same name written by Graham Greene published in 1949.

Academy Awards 1950 --- Ceremony Number 23 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best CinematographyRobert KraskerWon
Best DirectorCarol ReedNominated
Best Film EditingOswald HafenrichterNominated
.

BlogHub Articles:

The Third Man At 70

By 4 Star Film Fan on Oct 16, 2019 From 4 Star Films

Oh, how I love The?Third Man (or The 3rd Man). Regardless of how you write it, Carol Reed‘s post-war noir is one of those special films that was a case of love at first sight.? I knew some of the reasons already, but watching the film with a friend (on his first viewing) teased them out even m... Read full article


The Third Man (1949): Out of the Rubble

By 4 Star Film Fan on Nov 2, 2017 From 4 Star Films

Like the fella says, in Italy for 30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love – they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? T... Read full article


The Third Man (1949): Out of the Rubble

By 4 Star Film Fan on Nov 2, 2017 From 4 Star Films

Like the fella says, in Italy for 30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love – they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? T... Read full article


The Third Man (1949, Carol Reed)

By Andrew Wickliffe on Jul 16, 2016 From The Stop Button

The Third Man runs just over a hundred minutes and takes place over a few days. It’s never clear just how many; director Reed and writer Graham Greene are both resistant to the idea of making the film too procedural. Greene’s scenes, even when they’re expository, still strive again... Read full article


The Third Man

By Amanda Garrett on Apr 10, 2016 From Old Hollywood Films

Today, I'm reviewing The Third Man (1949), starring Joseph Cotten. This article is part of Words! Words! Words! A Chatty CMBA Blogathon from the members of the Classic Movie Blog Association. Holly Martins, as played by Joseph Cotten in the classic Cold War thriller The Third Man (1949), is n... Read full article


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Quotes from

Anna Schmidt: You know, you ought to get yourself a girl.


Opening narrator: I never knew the old Vienna before the war with its Strauss music, its glamour and easy charm. Constantinople suited me better.
[Scenes of black market goods changing hands]
Opening narrator: I really got to know it in the classic period of the black market. We'd run anything if people wanted it enough and had the money to pay. Of course a situation like that does tempt amateurs
[Dead body seen floating in the river]
Opening narrator: but, well, you know, they can't stay the course like a professional.
Opening narrator: Now the city is divided into four zones, you know, each occupied by a power: the American, the British, the Russian and the French. But the centre of the city that's international policed by an international patrol. One member of each of the four powers. Wonderful! What a hope they had! All strangers to the place and none of them could speak the same language. Except a sort of smattering of German.
Opening narrator: Good fellows on the whole, did their best you know. Vienna doesn't really look any worse than a lot of other European cities. Bombed about a bit.
Opening narrator: Oh, I was going to tell you, wait, I was going to tell you about Holly Martins, an American. Came all the way here to visit a friend of his. The name was Lime, Harry Lime. Now Martins was broke and Lime had offered him, some sort, I don't know, some sort of job.
Opening narrator: Anyway, there he was, poor chap. Happy as a lark and without a cent.


Harry Lime: Don't be so gloomy. After all it's not that awful. Like the fella says, in Italy for 30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love - they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock. So long Holly.


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Facts about

Rumors have long since been widespread that Orson Welles wrote all of Harry Lime's dialogue and even that he took over the direction of his own scenes. Everyone involved, including Welles himself, have always insisted that the film was directed by only Carol Reed. Welles did claim that he wrote most of Lime's dialogue, which is also a fabrication. The extent of Welles' contributions were Lime's grumbling about his stomach problems (which were improvisations) and the famous "cuckoo clock" spiel at the end of the ferris wheel scene.
During meetings between Graham Greene and Carol Reed with David O. Selznick, Greene was less than impressed with Selznick, who had (according to Selznick's own son) "become something of a parody of himself". Greene later mocked Selznick's dependency at the stage on the drug Dexedrine, better known as "speed". Coincidentally, Reed also became hooked on Dexedrine while shooting the time-consuming film. Both Reed and Selznick were operating on as little as 2 hours of sleep a day.
Carol Reed had three separate film units working most days of production: a daytime unit, a nighttime unit and a sewer unit. Reed insisted upon directing each unit, resulting in him working 20 hour days.
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