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The Little Shop of Horrors Overview:

The Little Shop of Horrors (1960) was a Comedy - Musical Film directed by Roger Corman and Charles B. Griffith and produced by Roger Corman.

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[BASP] The Little Shop of Horrors (1960, Roger Corman) / Please Don&’t Eat My Mother (1973, Carl Monson)

By Andrew Wickliffe on May 9, 2016 From The Stop Button

The Best of An Alan Smithee Podcast: Episode Twenty-two The Little Shop of Horrors (1960, Roger Corman) / Please Don&’t Eat My Mother (1973, Carl Monson) Originally posted: January 3, 2013 Subscribe via iTunes.... Read full article


The Little Shop of Horrors (1960, Roger Corman)

on Aug 28, 2013 From The Stop Button

The filmmaking economy in The Little Shop of Horrors is astounding. Most of the film takes place in one set–the titular shop–and Charles B. Griffith’s script works hard to imply the world outside that set. My favorite bit in the script is probably when leading man Jonathan Haze is ... Read full article


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Quotes from

Wilbur Force: [reading an article from "Pain" magazine in the waiting room of the dentist; giggling] "The patient came to me with a large hole in his abdomen, caused by a fire poker used on him by his wife. He almost bled to death and gangrene had set in. I didn't give him much of a chance. There were other complications. The man had cancer, tuberculosis, leprosy, and a touch of the grippe. I decided to operate."


Burson Fouch: I remember in one flower shop there was a whole wall covered with poison ivy. People came from miles around to look at that wall and they stayed to buy.
Gravis Mushnik: And the owner got rich?
Burson Fouch: No, he scratched himself to death in an insane asylum.


Seymour Krelboin: I didn't mean it.
Gravis Mushnik: You didn't mean it. You never mean it. You didn't mean the time when you put up the bouquet with the 'get well' card in the funeral parlor, and sent the black lilies to that old lady in the hospital. You're fired and this time, I, Gravis Mushnik, mean it!
Burson Fouch: [to Seymour] I think he means it.


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Facts about

When asked where Seymour got the plant, he replies that the seeds were obtained by a Japanese gardener who found the bulb in a "plantation next to a cranberry farm." This joke is lost on modern audiences. In 1959, it was announced that cranberry crops were tainted with traces of the herbicide aminotriazole, and as a result, cranberry sales plummeted.
The name of the character 'Siddie Shiva' is a pun from the phrase 'sitting Shiva', a Jewish funerary ritual, as well as a direct reference to her unlucky and constantly expiring relatives.
Charles B. Griffith put several of his relatives in the film; Myrtle Vail - "grandmother" Myrt - for example, is actually his grandmother, and the hobo that Dr. Farb tortures in his office is Griffith's father. He also placed several of his relatives in crowd scenes. The bums in the background of the street shots on Skid Row are real transients, however, and were filmed in the actual skid row area of Los Angeles.
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Also directed by Roger Corman




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Also produced by Roger Corman




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Also released in 1960




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