The Flight of the Phoenix Overview:

The Flight of the Phoenix (1965) was a Adventure - Drama Film directed by Robert Aldrich and produced by Robert Aldrich and Walter Blake.

Academy Awards 1965 --- Ceremony Number 38 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best Supporting ActorIan BannenNominated
Best Film EditingMichael LucianoNominated
.

BlogHub Articles:

"The Flight of the Phoenix" Soars

By Rick29 on Sep 14, 2013 From Classic Film & TV Cafe

Director Robert Aldrich bookends The Flight of the Phoenix with a wild airplane crash and an exhilarating climax. But it’s the drama in-between that makes the film so engrossing: the friction among the survivors, their audacious plan to reach civilization again, and a brilliant plot twist tha... Read full article


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Quotes from

Lew Moran: You told Towns he was behaving as if stupidity was a virtue. If he's making it into a virtue, YOU'RE MAKING IT INTO A BLOODY SCIENCE!


Lew Moran: Time was you could take real pride, in just getting there, flying used to be fun Lou, it really was.
Frank Towns: He's crazy Lou, he builds toy airplanes.


Lew Moran: Maybe Frank Towns, who's flown every crate they've ever built and could fly in and out of a tennis court if he had to, maybe that great hell-for-leather trailblazer's nothing more than a back number now. And maybe men like Dorfmann can build machines that can do Frank Towns's job for him, and do it better


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Facts about

The Tallmantz Phoenix P-1 was designed by Otto Timm and built by Tallmantz Aviation Inc. for the film. It had the following characteristics:
  • Length: 45'
  • Wingspan: 42'
  • Engine: a like-new Pratt & Whitney R-1340 nine cylinder radial engine of 650 hp, taken from a T-6, as were the wheels and various other parts.
  • Wings: wing panels taken from a T-11 (civilian conversion of an AT-11 which is a Beechcraft 18 type )
  • The apparent wing, tail, and undercarriage wire bracing was made out of clothesline, and was intentionally made to look flimsy.
  • The fuselage and empennage were all hand-built from scratch - plywood over a wood frame.
  • The cockpit was shallow and makeshift. The pilot sat down. Another person stood behind the pilot and was strapped to a stringer.

Director Robert Aldrich's son (William Aldrich) and son-in-law (Peter Bravos) are the first two casualties in the film, killed by falling cargo during the opening credits as the disabled plane is descending for its crash-landing.
At least one of the aircraft used once flew for the US Marine Corps. The passenger information board inside the fuselage shows VMR-253, a USMC transport squadron, and R4Q-1, the military type designation, and the military serial, BuNo, 126580.
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Best Supporting Actor Oscar 1965






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Also directed by Robert Aldrich




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Also released in 1965




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