Stagecoach Overview:

Stagecoach (1939) was a Western - Black-and-white Film directed by John Ford and produced by John Ford.

The film was based on the short story The Stage to Lordsburg written by Ernest Haycox published in Collier's in Apr 1937.

Stagecoach was inducted into the National Film Registry in 1995.

Academy Awards 1939 --- Ceremony Number 12 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best Supporting ActorThomas MitchellWon
Best Art DirectionAlexander ToluboffNominated
Best CinematographyBert GlennonNominated
Best DirectorJohn FordNominated
Best Film EditingOtho Lovering, Dorothy SpencerNominated
Best Music - ScoringRichard Hageman, Frank Harling, John Leipold, Leo ShukenWon
Best PictureWalter Wanger (production company)Nominated
.

BlogHub Articles:

Claire Trevor and John Wayne head the cast of “Stagecoach”

By Stephen Reginald on Jun 30, 2021 From Classic Movie Man

Claire Trevor and John Wayne head the cast of “Stagecoach” Stagecoach (1939) is an American Western classic directed by John Ford and starring Claire Trevor and John Wayne. The film was produced by Walter Wanger Productions and the cinematography was by Bert Glennon (Young Mr. Linco... Read full article


Silver Screen Standards: Stagecoach (1939)

By Jennifer Garlen on Apr 5, 2021 From Classic Movie Hub Blog

Silver Screen Standards: Stagecoach (1939) I took a short ride in a stagecoach once, at the Old Tucson Western theme park in Arizona, and it permanently altered my impression of films like Stagecoach (1939), where travelers make long journeys in those noisy, dusty, bumpy conveyances. Anybody who ... Read full article


Review: Stagecoach (1939)

By 4 Star Film Fan on Apr 21, 2019 From 4 Star Films

While the western hardly began with Stagecoach, one could go out on a very slight limb and say it became a more fully realized version of itself in the hands of John Ford; it all but grew in stature as a genre. This progression cropped out of the prevailing assumption of the day and age that the wes... Read full article


Stagecoach: An Appreciation

By Amanda Garrett on May 15, 2018 From Old Hollywood Films

Claire Trevor and John Wayne in the classic Western Stagecoach (1939). This article is part of The Classic Comfort Movie Blogathon hosted by Classic Film & TV Cafe. "What I remember is the time John Wayne killed three people with a carbine while falling to the dusty street in Stagecoach," ... Read full article


DOUBLE BILL #7: Stagecoach (1939) and The Searchers (1956)

By Carol Martinheira on Oct 10, 2017 From The Old Hollywood Garden

DOUBLE BILL #7: Stagecoach (1939) and The Searchers (1956) On October 10, 2017October 10, 2017 By CarolIn Uncategorized John Ford and John Wayne. One of cinema?s greatest and most celebrated director-actor partnerships. They made dozens of films together and they were ... Read full article


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Quotes from

Ringo Kid: Well, I guess you can't break out of prison and into society in the same week.


[first lines]
Cavalry scout: These hills here are full of Apaches. They've burnt every ranch building in sight.
[referring to Indian scout]
Cavalry scout: He had a brush with them last night. Says they're being stirred up by Geronimo.
Capt. Sickel: Geronimo? How do we know he isn't lying?
Cavalry scout: No, he's a Cheyenne. They hate Apaches worse than we do.


[Mrs. Mallory, a passenger, has just given birth]
Buck: Hey, Curly, do you think I oughta charge Mrs. Mallory's baby half fare?


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Facts about

When the film was being cast, John Ford lobbied hard for John Wayne but producer Walter Wanger kept saying no. It was only after constant persistence on Ford's part that Wanger finally gave in. Wanger's reservations were based on Wayne's string of B-movies, in which he came across as being a less than competent actor, and the box office failure of Raoul Walsh's The Big Trail in 1930, Wayne's first serious starring role.
A device known as a "Running W" was used on the Indians' horses during the sequence where they are chasing the stagecoach. Strong, thin wires are fixed to a metal post, then the other end of the wires are attached to an iron clamp that encircles the legs of a horse, and the post is anchored into the ground. The horse is then ridden at full gallop, and when the wire's maximum length is reached - just when the rider is "shot" - the animal's legs are jerked out from underneath it, causing it to tumble violently and throw the "shot" rider off. The trouble was that the rider knew when the horse was going to fall but the horse didn't, resulting in many horses either being killed outright or having to be destroyed because of broken limbs incurred during the falls. The use of the "Running W" was eventually discontinued after many complaints from both inside and outside the film industry.
Doctor Boone's misquote, 'Is this the face that wrecked a thousand ships/ and burned the towerless tops of Ilium?', is from 'The Tragical History of Doctor Faustus' by Christopher Marlowe, Scene xiv.
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Best Supporting Actor Oscar 1939






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National Film Registry

Stagecoach

Released 1939
Inducted 1995
(Sound)




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