Classic Movie Hub (CMH)
 

Charlie Chaplin book Smile by Gary Golio

Singin' in the Rain Overview:

Singin' in the Rain (1952) was a Comedy - Musical Film directed by Stanley Donen and Gene Kelly and produced by Arthur Freed and Roger Edens.

Singin' in the Rain was inducted into the National Film Registry in 1989.

Academy Awards 1952 --- Ceremony Number 25 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best Supporting ActressJean HagenNominated
Best Music - ScoringLennie HaytonNominated
.

BlogHub Articles:

1001 Classic Movies: Singin' in the Rain

By Amanda Garrett on Jan 9, 2017 From Old Hollywood Films

Singin' in the Rain (1952), starring Debbie Reynolds and Gene Kelly, is one of the 1001 classic movies you should see. Each Monday, I'm going to recommend a classic movie you should see (for the reasons behind the 1001 series and reviews of earlier films covered go here). January's theme is movie... Read full article


HOORAY FOR HOLLYWOOD: SINGIN' IN THE RAIN (1952)

By FlickChick on Aug 2, 2014 From A Person in the Dark

Since my slavish devotion to Lina Lamont is well known to anyone who might have stumbled by here in the past, I simply had to include Singin’ in the Rain as part of the Hooray for Hollywood series. I can’t help viewing this film as a musical counterpoint to Sunset Boulevard; sort of... Read full article


CMBA Blogathon: Fabulous Films Of the 50s: Singin' In the Rain

By Vanessa Buttino on May 19, 2014 From Stardust

CMBA Blogathon: Fabulous Films Of the 50s: Singin' In the Rain Believe it or not, this is now the FOURTH time I've had to re-start this blog post. Singin' In the Rain is one of my all-time favourite classic films and yet I can't seem to put pen to paper - or in this case, fingers to keys -... Read full article


HOORAY FOR HOLLYWOOD: SINGIN' IN THE RAIN

By FlickChick on Jan 22, 2014 From A Person in the Dark

2014 is the year A Person in the Dark celebrates films about my favorite place - Hollywood! Singin' in the Rain When "Singin' in the Rain" was released in 1952, silent films had been a thing of the past for only 24 years or so. Probably more than half of those in the audience remembered them... Read full article


CMBA Film Passion 101 Blogathon: "Singin' in the Rain"

By David on Dec 3, 2013 From The Man on the Flying Trapeze

I was 10 years old when I remember seeing Gene Kelly for the first time, and I was not impressed. It was 1967, and Kelly was the star of a musical TV version of "Jack and the Beanstalk," and he was just so ... so ...smarmy. I felt like he was talking down to me, and I was 10! Besides, I was much ... Read full article


See all Singin' in the Rain articles

Quotes from

Lina: You mean it's going to say on the screen that I don't talk and sing for myself?


Cosmo Brown: Why bother to shoot this film? Why not release the old one under a new title? You've seen one, you've seen them all.
Don Lockwood: Hey, what'd you say that for?
Cosmo Brown: What's the matter?
Don Lockwood: That's what that Kathy Selden said to me that night.
Cosmo Brown: That's three weeks ago, you still thinking about that?
Don Lockwood: I can't get her out of my mind.
Cosmo Brown: How could you - she's the first dame who hasn't fallen for your line since you were four.


Chorus: [singing] Gotta dance!
Don Lockwood: [singing] Gotta dance! Gotta Dance! / Broadway Rhythm, it's got me, everybody dance!


read more quotes from Singin' in the Rain...

Facts about

Like Lina Lamont, when sound films arrived, many silent screen actors lost their careers because their voices didn't match their screen personas. The most famous example is silent star John Gilbert. However, it wasn't the sound of his voice that killed his career; it was the rumored behind-the-scenes backstabbing (speeding up of his voice by sound technicians, on direct orders from someone with an agenda) and the ridiculously florid lines he had to say. The lines that Gene Kelly's character speaks in "The Dueling Cavalier" are based on the types of lines that killed John Gilbert's career. Gilbert's actual lines as a mock Romeo in the "William Shakespeare Scene" in The Hollywood Revue of 1929 is an example of this.
While the film makes a central point of the idea that Kathy's voice is dubbed over Lina Lamont's, what is not told is that, ironically, in some of these songs - notably "Would You" and "You Are My Lucky Star" - Debbie Reynolds, the actress who plays Kathy, is actually dubbed by Betty Noyes. However, Reynolds' own singing voice can be heard on the outtake footage of "Lucky Star" as performed next to the giant billboard of Gene Kelly.
Most of the characters are based on actual people: -R.F. Simpson, the studio head, is obviously a parody on Louis B. Mayer, with touches of Arthur Freed -Dora Bailey is an obvious cariacature of Louella Parsons -Zelda Zanders, the "Zip Girl" is based on Clara Bow, the "It Girl" -Roscoe Dexter, the director is based on eccentric director Erich von Stroheim -Olga, the vamp at the premiere, is based on Pola Negri and Gloria Swanson, both of whom landed royalty as husbands.
read more facts about Singin' in the Rain...
Share this page:
Smile: How Young Charlie Chaplin Taught the World to Laugh (and Cry)
Best Supporting Actress Oscar 1952






See more Best Supporting Actress awards>>
National Film Registry

Singin' in the Rain

Released 1952
Inducted 1989
(Sound)




See All Films in National Registry >>
Also directed by Stanley Donen




More about Stanley Donen >>
Also produced by Arthur Freed




More about Arthur Freed >>
Related Lists
Create a list




See All Related Lists >>
Also released in 1952




See All 1952 films >>
More "Romance (Comic)" films



See All "Romance (Comic)" films >>
More "Dance" films



See All "Dance" films >>
More "Fame" films



See All "Fame" films >>
More "Show Business" films



See All "Show Business" films >>
error