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Lost Horizon Overview:

Lost Horizon (1937) was a Adventure - Drama Film directed by Frank Capra and produced by Frank Capra and Harry Cohn.

The film was based on the novel of the same name written by James Hilton published in 1933.

Academy Awards 1937 --- Ceremony Number 10 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best Supporting ActorH. B. WarnerNominated
Best Art DirectionStephen GoossonWon
Best Film EditingGene Havlick, Gene MilfordWon
Best Music - ScoringColumbia Studio Music Department, Morris Stoloff, head of department (Score by Dimitri Tiomkin)Nominated
Best PictureColumbiaNominated
.

BlogHub Articles:

In Defense of the Musical Lost Horizon

By Rick29 on Apr 29, 2019 From Classic Film & TV Cafe

A glimpse of Shangri-La. It was a boxoffice bomb and savaged by critics. It barely recouped 25% of its budget, leading the movie industry to label it "The Lost Investment." Time hasn't been kind to it. Rather than becoming a cult film, it has been lambasted in books such as The Fifty Worst Films of... Read full article


PLANES, TRAINS, AND AUTOMOBILES: FRANK CAPRA'S "LOST HORIZON"

By The Lady Eve on Oct 20, 2015 From Lady Eve's Reel Life

Frank Capra's wistful 1937 fantasy, Lost Horizon, begins dramatically with a chaotic mob scene at an airfield in war-torn Baskul, China, highlighted by a spectacular explosion and fire. In the midst of the fray, British diplomat Robert Conway (Ronald Colman) is managing the evacuation of 90 Westerne... Read full article


PLANES, TRAINS, AND AUTOMOBILES: FRANK CAPRA'S "LOST HORIZON"

By The Lady Eve on Oct 20, 2015 From Lady Eve's Reel Life

Frank Capra's wistful 1937 fantasy Lost Horizon begins dramatically with a chaotic mob scene at an airfield in war-torn Baskul, China, highlighted by a spectacular explosion and fire. In the midst of the fray, British diplomat Robert Conway (Ronald Colman) is managing the evacuation of 90 Westerners... Read full article


PLANES, TRAINS, AND AUTOMOBILES: FRANK CAPRA'S "LOST HORIZON"

By The Lady Eve on Oct 20, 2015 From Lady Eve's Reel Life

Frank Capra's wistful 1937 fantasy, Lost Horizon, begins dramatically with a chaotic mob scene at an airfield in war-torn Baskul, China, highlighted by a spectacular explosion and fire. In the midst of the fray, British diplomat Robert Conway (Ronald Colman) is managing the evacuation of 90 Westerne... Read full article


Lost Horizon (1937)

By 4 Star Film Fan on Apr 14, 2015 From 4 Star Films

Certainly this is not the most well known or the best film of Capra. It is in fact quite different from a lot of his filmography. That is not to say that it is not an enjoyable film about a man who finds a little piece of Utopia called Shangri-La. Ronald Colman was certainly a likable fellow in the ... Read full article


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Quotes from

Robert Conway: It is very common here to live to a very ripe old age. Climate, diet - the mountain water you might say. But we like to believe it's the absence of struggle in the way we live. In your countries, on the over hand, how often do you hear the expression, "He worried himself to death", or "This thing or that thing on that killed him".
Chang: Oh, very often.
Robert Conway: And very true. Your lives are, as a rule, shorter. Not so much by natural death, as by indirect suicide.


High Lama: I wanted to meet the Conway who in one of his books said: "There are moments in every mans life, when he glimpses the eternal". That Conway seemed to belong here.


Robert Conway: George, didn't you ever want to know what's on the other side of the mountain?


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Facts about

Its budget was $1.5 million and the film ultimately cost almost twice as much as that, a sum significantly higher than most of Columbia's other output combined.
After initial reservations about Frank Capra's method of directing, Ronald Colman would eventually come to rely on him and the two would experiment with improvisations.
Edward Bernds came up with the idea to achieve a faster, barbaric tempo for the previously slow-moving refueling scene was to have the tribesmen hack off the tops of the gasoline cans with bayonets and slosh the gasoline out. Capra liked the idea and included it.
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