I'll Be Seeing You Overview:

I'll Be Seeing You (1944) was a Drama - Family Film directed by George Cukor and William Dieterle and produced by David O. Selznick and Dore Schary.

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THE THIRD FRED ASTAIRE AND GINGER ROGERS BLOGATHON: I'll Be Seeing You, 1944

on Dec 28, 2020 From Caftan Woman

Michaela of Love Letters to Old Hollywood is hosting The Third Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers blogathon while her partner in this endeavour, Crystal of In the Good Old Days of Classic Hollywood is hospitalized with a serious illness. The blogathon is a lovely way we can send our best wishes to Cryst... Read full article


Ver-te-ei Outra Vez (1944) / I'll Be Seeing You (1944)

By L? on Sep 7, 2018 From Critica Retro

Ver-te-ei Outra Vez (1944) / I'll Be Seeing You (1944) Uma das verdades da vida ? que todas as pessoas que conhecemos est?o vivendo batalhas internas que mal podemos imaginar. Olhos pl?cidos podem esconder o tormento da alma e pessoas com mentes agitadas podem esconder a ansiedade com gestos ... Read full article


Ver-te-ei Outra Vez (1944) / I'll Be Seeing You (1944)

By L? on Nov 30, -0001 From Critica Retro

Ver-te-ei Outra Vez (1944) / I'll Be Seeing You (1944) Uma das verdades da vida ? que todas as pessoas que conhecemos est?o vivendo batalhas internas que mal podemos imaginar. Olhos pl?cidos podem esconder o tormento da alma e pessoas com mentes agitadas podem esconder a ansiedade com gestos ... Read full article


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Quotes from

Mr. Marshall: [after they sing a Christmas carol together] Well, it feels pretty comfortable to have another man's voice around at Christmastime.
Mrs. Marshall: I'm sure Barbara's doing her best to arrange that for you, Henry.
Barbara Marshall: Oh, mother.
Mrs. Marshall: Oh, darling. Maybe family jokes are in bad taste. They make the guest feel out of place.
Zachary Morgan: No, ma'am. I haven't felt so easy in a long time. This is the best Christmas dinner I ever had. Yesterday, I was a stranger here. I mean, I felt like a prisoner inside myself. Now, just to be in a home like this, with people like you, maybe someplace I can come back to next month, or next year...


Mrs. Marshall: You must have been looking forward to it, Mary.
Mary Marshall: I was looking forward to seeing you, Aunt Sarah.
Mrs. Marshall: Oh, that's sweet of you, dear.
Mary Marshall: As a matter of fact, selfish. I've been doing a lot of thinking in the past three years, Aunt Sarah, and...
Mrs. Marshall: What sort of things were you thinking, Mary?
Mary Marshall: Coming out into the world and... Even coming here, I had a feeling that ...
Mrs. Marshall: Honey, you've got to stop being afraid. You've got to stop feeling that you're branded like people were in the old days. You've done something. You're paying your debt to society. Most people are willing to let it go at that.
Mary Marshall: I know, Aunt Sarah, but coming out into the world and seeing everybody in uniform, everybody doing something... I just don't belong. I don't fit in. And dreams that I've had for the future are just impossible.
Mrs. Marshall: Well, most dreams are, Mary. It's just the dreaming that counts. Nobody gets exactly what he wants out of life. One of the first things you learn is to make compromises with your dreams.
Mary Marshall: But I'm not talking about palaces and rainbows, Aunt Sarah. I'm talking about a home. A home like this with a kitchen and a stove and an icebox, and a husband, and a child.
Mrs. Marshall: Yes, I have all that. Yet I used to dream about palaces and rainbows.
Mary Marshall: But you're happy.
Mrs. Marshall: Of course. Because I didn't hold out for too much. I accepted what I thought was second best and made that do. Oh, it's something that everybody learns sooner or later. You have to get used to accepting what you think is second best, and then you find out it's first best after all.


Mary Marshall: [getting into a cab] Bye.
Zachary Morgan: Bye.
Mary Marshall: [to cab driver] 617 North Elm Street.
Zachary Morgan: Oh, wait. If, uh, if anybody tried to telephone you, how could they get you?
Mary Marshall: Well, uh, my uncle's name is in the telephone book. Henry Marshall.
Zachary Morgan: Henry Marshall? Good. Oh! What's your name?
Mary Marshall: Mary. Mary - Mary Marshall.
Zachary Morgan: Mary Marshall. Good-bye.
Mary Marshall: Good-bye.
Zachary Morgan: Wait a minute. Um, if somebody calls and says it's Zachary Morgan, that's me.
Mary Marshall: [laughing] Oh. Glad to meet you.
Zachary Morgan: Merry Christmas.
Mary Marshall: Merry Christmas.


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Facts about

Director George Cukor was replaced by William Dieterle.
The quote from Lincoln under his photograph in the YMCA room is from his Cooper Union Address: "Let us have faith that right makes might, and in that faith, let us, to the end, dare to do our duty as we understand it" (February 27, 1860).
Joan Fontaine, who was to play the female lead, was forced to withdraw due to previous commitments.
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Also directed by William Dieterle




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Also produced by David O. Selznick




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Also released in 1944




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More "Christmas" films



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More "Holiday" films



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