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How the West Was Won Overview:

How the West Was Won (1962) was a Adventure - Drama Film directed by George Marshall and Richard Thorpe and produced by Bernard Smith.

How the West Was Won was inducted into the National Film Registry in 1997.

Academy Awards 1963 --- Ceremony Number 36 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best Art DirectionArt Direction: George W. Davis, William Ferrari, Addison Hehr; Set Decoration: Henry Grace, Don GNominated
Best CinematographyWilliam H. Daniels, Milton Krasner, Charles Lang, Jr., Joseph LaShelleNominated
Best Costume DesignWalter PlunkettNominated
Best Film EditingHarold F. KressWon
Best Music - ScoringAlfred Newman, Ken DarbyNominated
Best PictureBernard Smith, ProducerNominated
Best WritingJames R. WebbWon
.

BlogHub Articles:

How the West Was Won (1962)

By Beatrice on Sep 19, 2017 From Flickers in Time

How the West Was Won Directed by John Ford, Henry Hathaway and George Marshall Written by James R. Webb 1962/USA Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer/Cinerama Productions Co. Repeat viewing/Netflix rental The big Cinerama moments are the parts I remember from my childhood. ?They are still the best thing about t... Read full article


How the West Was Won ( 1962 ) ....and How it Didn't Win the Cinematography Oscar

By The Metzinger Sisters on Feb 28, 2016 From Silver Scenes - A Blog for Classic Film Lovers

There were some years in Oscar's history that were stellar. In those years no matter how good a film was, compared to all of the fine films it was competing with, it would be just on par with the average. In such years as these it is understandable when a really good film loses an Academy Award. The... Read full article


How the West Was Won ( 1962 ) ....and How it Didn't Win the Cinematography Oscar

By The Metzinger Sisters on Feb 28, 2016 From Silver Scenes - A Blog for Classic Film Lovers

There were some years in Oscar's history that were stellar. In those years no matter how good a film was, compared to all of the fine films it was competing with, it would be just on par with the average. In such years as these it is understandable when a really good film loses an Academy Award. The... Read full article


How the West Was Won ( 1962 ) ....and How it Didn't Win the Cinematography Oscar

By The Metzinger Sisters on Feb 28, 2016 From Silver Scenes - A Blog for Classic Film Lovers

There were some years in Oscar's history that were stellar. In those years no matter how good a film was, compared to all of the fine films it was competing with, it would be just on par with the average. In such years as these it is understandable when a really good film loses an Academy Award. The... Read full article


How the West Was Won

By Alyson on Dec 11, 2010 From The Best Picture Project

Do kids still play Cowboys and Indians today? ?I?m guessing that game was at it?s peak around the early sixties with the abundance of Westerns in theaters throughout the fifties. ?From what I remember, the game was basically the Indians making a bunch of noise and throwing pretend arrows or tomahawk... Read full article


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Quotes from

Narrator: [speaking about the Erie Canal] ... about 150 years ago, an idea took shape in the mind of a man named DeWitt Clinton. And in the way Americans have of acting out their dreams, it came to be.


Charlie Gant: There's only one kind of peace I know of, Marshal. That's the kind my brother's got.


Cleve Van Valen: From the first moment I saw you I've known that I couldn't live without you.
Lilith 'Lily' Prescott: Well... I'd hate to be the cause of your death, Mr. Van Valen.


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Facts about

This was one of only two films made in true Cinerama which were shown in regular theatres after their first runs. None of the previous Cinerama films were ever shown in regular theatres because they were travelogues and documentaries made only to show off the process, as opposed to telling a story, and it would have been pointless to show these in a "regular" format.
John Ford complained that the sheer breadth of the Cinerama cameras meant that he had to dress his sets to a much wider degree than usual.
During the Indian attack that was filmed in Lone Pine, California, a Conestoga Wagon tumbles down a hill. In order to create the illusion of the audience being inside of a tumbling wagon, a track was built down the slope of a small hill and the top portion of a Conestoga Wagon, without the wheels, was affixed onto a flatbed along with a mechanism that would turn the wagon over and over as the flatbed was guided down the hill. The Cinerama camera, in turn, was attached to one end of the flatbed so that it could shoot directly through the turning wagon as the stuntmen, including Loren Janes, were tumbled around the insides of the wagon along with boxes, barrels, blankets and other cargo. It took more than two days to prepare the scene and several takes to complete. In the final cut, this scene lasts no more than five seconds on the screen.
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Best Writing Oscar 1963











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National Film Registry

How the West Was Won

Released 1962
Inducted 1997
(Sound)




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Also directed by John Ford




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Also produced by Bernard Smith




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