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Double Indemnity Overview:

Double Indemnity (1944) was a Crime - Film Noir Film directed by Billy Wilder and produced by Buddy G. DeSylva and Joseph Sistrom.

The film was based on the serial story of the same name written by James M. Cain published in Liberty Magazine and as a Novel (1936 magazine; 1943 novel).

Double Indemnity was inducted into the National Film Registry in 1992.

Academy Awards 1944 --- Ceremony Number 17 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best ActressBarbara StanwyckNominated
Best CinematographyJohn SeitzNominated
Best DirectorBilly WilderNominated
Best Music - ScoringMiklos RozsaNominated
Best PictureParamountNominated
Best WritingBilly Wilder, Raymond ChandlerNominated
.

BlogHub Articles:

Noir Nook: Just the Facts on Double Indemnity

By Karen Burroughs Hannsberry on Sep 12, 2019 From Classic Movie Hub Blog

Noir Nook: Just the Facts on Double Indemnity Not long ago, I was interviewed on a podcast about my very favorite film noir ? Double Indemnity (1944). I had an absolute ball talking about the superb writing and direction, the distinctive cinematography and music, and the first-rate performances b... Read full article


Cinema Style File - Barbara Stanwyck Straight Down the Line in 1944's DOUBLE INDEMNITY

on Jul 8, 2019 From GlamAmor

A little over a week ago, I started my Pre-Code screening series The Style of Sin at the Egyptian Theatre and my first star was Barbara Stanwyck. As we saw while watching Ladies of Leisure (1930) and Baby Face (1933), she was a talented actress from the very beginning of her career. And though a fil... Read full article


Double Indemnity (1944, Billy Wilder)

By Andrew Wickliffe on Feb 16, 2018 From The Stop Button

Double Indemnity is mostly a character study. There?s the noir framing device?wounded insurance salesman Fred MacMurray stumbling into his office and recording his confession on a dictaphone. Turns out he met a woman and things didn?t work out. MacMurray narrates the entire film. Occasionally the ac... Read full article


Five Things I Learned from Double Indemnity

By Amanda Garrett on Oct 15, 2016 From Old Hollywood Films

Today, I'm writing about the lessons I learned from the classic film noir Double Indemnity (1944), starring Fred MacMurray, Barbara Stanwyck, and Edward G. Robinson. This article is part of the Things I Learned from the Movies blogathon hosted by Speakeasy and Silver Screenings. There are many... Read full article


Double Indemnity (1944)

on Jul 20, 2015 From Journeys in Classic Film

Originally published March 2012 This is my second viewing of Double Indemnity, and my first time where I actually had to study it critically as part of my Women in Film class. ?The first time I saw the movie was for an earlier film class and while I enjoyed it, I didn’t consider it anything sp... Read full article


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Quotes from

Phyllis: Mr. Neff, why don't you drop by tomorrow evening about eight-thirty. He'll be in then.
Walter Neff: Who?
Phyllis: My husband. You were anxious to talk to him weren't you?
Walter Neff: Yeah, I was, but I'm sort of getting over the idea, if you know what I mean.
Phyllis: There's a speed limit in this state, Mr. Neff. Forty-five miles an hour.
Walter Neff: How fast was I going, officer?
Phyllis: I'd say around ninety.
Walter Neff: Suppose you get down off your motorcycle and give me a ticket.
Phyllis: Suppose I let you off with a warning this time.
Walter Neff: Suppose it doesn't take.
Phyllis: Suppose I have to whack you over the knuckles.
Walter Neff: Suppose I bust out crying and put my head on your shoulder.
Phyllis: Suppose you try putting it on my husband's shoulder.
Walter Neff: That tears it.


Barton Keyes: Now look, Walter. A guy takes out an accident policy that's worth $100,000 if he's killed on the train. Then, two weeks later, he *is* killed on the train. And, not from the train accident, mind you, but falling off some silly observation car. You know what the mathematical probability of that is? One out of, oh, I don't know how many billions. And after that, the broken leg. No, it just, it just can't be the way it looks. Something has been worked on us!


[Norton, Keyes's boss, has just tried, unsuccessfully, to convince a client that her husband's death was a suicide]
Barton Keyes: You know, you, uh, oughta take a look at the statistics on suicide some time. You might learn a little something about the insurance business.
Edward S. Norton: Mister Keyes, I was RAISED in the insurance business.
Barton Keyes: Yeah, in the front office. Come now, you've never read an actuarial table in your life, have you? Why they've got ten volumes on suicide alone. Suicide by race, by color, by occupation, by sex, by seasons of the year, by time of day. Suicide, how committed: by poison, by firearms, by drowning, by leaps. Suicide by poison, subdivided by *types* of poison, such as corrosive, irritant, systemic, gaseous, narcotic, alkaloid, protein, and so forth; suicide by leaps, subdivided by leaps from high places, under the wheels of trains, under the wheels of trucks, under the feet of horses, from *steamboats*. But, Mr. Norton, of all the cases on record, there's not one single case of suicide by leap from the rear end of a moving train. And you know how fast that train was going at the point where the body was found? Fifteen miles an hour. Now how can anybody jump off a slow-moving train like that with any kind of expectation that he would kill himself? No. No soap, Mr. Norton. We're sunk, and we'll have to pay through the nose, and you know it.


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Facts about

On viewing the film's rushes, production head Buddy G. DeSylva remarked of Barbara Stanwyck's blonde wig, "We hired Barbara Stanwyck, and here we get George Washington"!
The scene where Neff and Dietrichson can't get their car started after the murder was added by Wilder after his car wouldn't start at the end of a shooting day.
Various studios expressed interest in the story when it first appeared in serial form in 1935 but realized it was unfilmable within the strictures of the newly-established Production Code.
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National Film Registry

Double Indemnity

Released 1944
Inducted 1992
(Sound)




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Also directed by Billy Wilder




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Also produced by Buddy G. DeSylva




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