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Destination Tokyo Overview:

Destination Tokyo (1943) was a Adventure - Historical Film directed by Delmer Daves and produced by Jack L. Warner and Jerry Wald.

Academy Awards 1943 --- Ceremony Number 16 (source: AMPAS)

AwardRecipientResult
Best WritingSteve FisherNominated
.

BlogHub Articles:

Destination Tokyo (1943)

By Beatrice on Sep 26, 2014 From Flickers in Time

Destination Tokyo Directed by Delmer Daves Written by Delmer Daves and Albert Maltz from an original story by Steve Fisher 1943/USA Warner Bros First viewing/Netflix rental Wolf: I don’t know. Strong arm, strong back, weak mind! This goes way overboard in the propaganda department at times.... Read full article


Destination Tokyo (1943)

on Jul 10, 2013 From Journeys in Classic Film

? Cary Grant did a few war pictures, as did practically every male star who wasn’t drafted into service, and Destination Tokyo is the one selected for this week’s tribute to Grant.? I’ve mentioned in past reviews of film in this genre that I’m not a fan of war movies; they te... Read full article


Destination Tokyo: A Classic Example of 1940s Propaganda War Film

By Jill Blake on Feb 23, 2013 From Sittin' on a Backyard Fence

Disclaimer: This post discusses Japanese racial stereotypes common in World War II propaganda films including examples of dialogue used.? Prior to the United States involvement in World War II, films produced in mainstream Hollywood glossed over or completely sidestepped discussion of the war in Eur... Read full article


Destination Tokyo

By RBuccicone on Mar 7, 2011 From MacGuffin Movies

Destination Tokyo (1944) ????? I have never been particularly drawn to war pictures or those that pair Cary Grant opposite a bunch of men, rather than wooing a woman, but Grant made some great war pictures, and Destination Tokyo is certainly one of those (I need to revisit Operation Petticoat, which... Read full article


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Quotes from

Capt. Cassidy: There was a democratic movement in Japan after the last war. What happened?
Reserve Officer Raymond: The leaders were assassinated.
Andy - Executive Officer: Well, what about the people?
Capt. Cassidy: They have no voice now. Starvation is the big stick, isn't it, Raymond?
Reserve Officer Raymond: That's right, sir. The big wage is seven dollars a week. They have no unions, no free press... nothing.
Capt. Cassidy: They do what they're told.
Reserve Officer Raymond: I'm afraid most of them believe what they're told - like that "hero" who knifed your torpedo man. They've been sold a swindle, and they accept it.
Andy - Executive Officer: But how can they support such big families on seven bucks a week?
Reserve Officer Raymond: They don't. Daughters of the poor are often sold to factories, or... worse - when they're about 12.
Capt. Cassidy: Females are useful there only to work or to have children. The Japs don't understand the love we have for our women. They don't even have a word for it in their language.


Reserve Officer Raymond: How'd you happen to volunteer for the submarine service, Captain?
Capt. Cassidy: [Coyly] Well, when I was a kid, I used to get a kick outta' swimming underwater.


Capt. Cassidy: [the 'Copperfin' has torpedoed, but not yet sunk, a Japanese carrier] Take her *under* the carrier - we'll finish the job with the sting from our tail.


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Facts about

The call by John Ridgely to the USS Hornet in Japanese saying "Dinki hokuku" actually translates as "electronic communications".
A press release for this movie announced that "Cassidy's Children" (i.e. the children of Captain Cassidy played by Cary Grant) were portrayed by the children of this movie's director, Delmer Daves. Daughter Debby Cassidy was played by daughter Deborah Daves whilst son Michael Cassidy was played by son Michael Daves. Both children's character's first names were the same as their real first names (i.e. Debby/Deborah and Michael) and both cameo performances were uncredited.
The appendectomy operation conducted by the character Pills (William Prince) was inspired by an actual appendix operation performed aboard the submarine "Seadragon" in 1942. The real-life appendectomy was performed by 22-year-old pharmacist's mate Wheeler B. Lipes with the help of an assistant. The two were able to extract the appendix of Seaman Darrell Dean Rector under very trying conditions with limited resources and skills. They used kitchen utensils and equipment including a strainer and bent spoons as retractors; alcohol taken from torpedoes, and sterilized pajamas as surgical gowns. The sub's crew had believed that Lipes was the most qualified person to perform such a life-or-death operation, as he had apparently observed appendectomies before. Lipes was persuaded to do the operation by his fellow crewmen. The operation took place 120 feet below the surface of the South China Sea. Afterwards, Lipes' actions were criticized by US Navy doctors and the US Surgeon General even considered court-martialling him. Over 60 years later, in April 2005, Lipes finally received the US Navy Commendation Medal, two months before his death. According to the 19 April 2005 Los Angeles Times obituary of Lipes, this operation was the first ever performed in a submerged submarine.
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Also directed by Delmer Daves




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