Darby O'Gill and the Little People Overview:

Darby O'Gill and the Little People (1959) was a Adventure - Family Film directed by Robert Stevenson and produced by Walt Disney.

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Darby O'Gill and the Little People ( 1959 )

By The Metzinger Sisters on Mar 17, 2016 From Silver Scenes - A Blog for Classic Film Lovers

"Three wishes I'll grant ye, great wishes an' small! But you wish a fourth and you'll lose them all!" Darby O'Gill is a wily old codger, but even with all his experience he canno' match wits with the king of the leprechauns, King O'Brien himself. On a spooky moonlit night in Ireland, Darby falls d... Read full article


Darby O'Gill and the Little People ( 1959 )

By The Metzinger Sisters on Mar 17, 2016 From Silver Scenes - A Blog for Classic Film Lovers

"Three wishes I'll grant ye, great wishes an' small! But you wish a fourth and you'll lose them all!" Darby O'Gill is a wily old codger, but even with all his experience he canno' match wits with the king of the leprechauns, King O'Brien himself. On a spooky moonlit night in Ireland, Darby falls d... Read full article


Darby O'Gill and the Little People ( 1959 )

By The Metzinger Sisters on Mar 17, 2016 From Silver Scenes - A Blog for Classic Film Lovers

"Three wishes I'll grant ye, great wishes an' small! But you wish a fourth and you'll lose them all!" Darby O'Gill is a wily old codger, but even with all his experience he canno' match wits with the king of the leprechauns, King O'Brien himself. On a spooky moonlit night in Ireland, Darby falls d... Read full article


Celebrate St. Patrick's Day with "Darby O'Gill and the Little People"

By Rick29 on Mar 17, 2015 From Classic Film & TV Cafe

In the picturesque Irish village of Rathcullen, old codger Darby O'Gill (Albert Sharpe) spends more time in the pub talking about leprechauns than tending to the estate of Lord Fitzpatrick. So, it's no surprise when the landowner decides it's time to replace Darby with the younger Michael McBride (S... Read full article


Celebrate St. Patrick's Day with "Darby O'Gill and the Little People"

By Rick29 on Mar 14, 2013 From Classic Film & TV Cafe

In the picturesque Irish village of Rathcullen, old codger Darby O'Gill (Albert Sharpe) spends more time in the pub talking about leprechauns than tending to the estate of Lord Fitzpatrick. So, it's no surprise when the landowner decides it's time to replace Darby with the younger Michael McBride (S... Read full article


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Quotes from

Darby O'Gill: This wasn't like any old Leprechaun that you wouldn't say hello twice to. But who was he, but Brian Conners himself, the King of them all! But I got me eye fixed on 'im. They can't escape, ye know, as long as ye don't look away. Now the night was dark, and the mountain was covered with mist, and the moon was no bigger than the light from a hay-penny candle. But it didn't hide 'im from me, for there he stood, with an angry little gob on him, an' his face as fierce as fire...


[Katie's fever breaks]
Molly Malloy: It's a miracle! She's fine an' sonsy like a baby woken from sleep!
[Michael runs in to her]
Katie O'Gill: Michael, what a temper I have.
Michael McBride: [smiling] Well, I like a lively girl.


Michael McBride: What kind of man are you at all, who doesn't believe in the little people?
Pony Sugrue: Maybe you'd like to find out.
Michael McBride: Indeed I would. You know, someone beat me over the head that night, and I thought it was the little people. But when I spoke to King Brian about it, he said that you should take the consequences.
Pony Sugrue: What consequences?
Michael McBride: Indeed, that's what I asked his Majesty. And you know what he said? He said, "If I were you, I'd poke the blackguard in the face."
[they fight; Pony is knocked down]


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Facts about

When Michael doesn't kiss Katie, King Brian (Jimmy O'Dea) exclaims "And him a Dublin man!" O'Dea was born and raised in Dublin.
A version of the song "My Pretty Irish Girl" sung by Sean Connery and Janet Munro was released as a single about the same time as the debut of the movie in 1959. Ironically, Sean Connery said the singing was the one aspect of the role he wasn't too fond of.
The lighting used to make sure the actors were kept in proper perspective without seeming false used up so much electricity it apparently blew out a substation in Burbank when the lights were turned on without warning.
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Also directed by Robert Stevenson




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Also produced by Walt Disney




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Also released in 1959




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