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Paul Frees

Paul Frees

According to author Peter Guralnick (in "Careless Love: The Unmaking of Elvis Presley"), Frees was an undercover narcotics agent for the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs in the 1960s.

Biography in: "Who's Who in Comedy" by Ronald L. Smith, pg. 170-171. New York: Facts on File, 1992. ISBN 0816023387

Got his start in radio, doing voice work for dramas and comedies. He was known for doing an incredible impersonation of Orson Welles. Reportedly, he played all of the roles in a 15-minute show called "The Speaker". His work included animation, for which he provided the voices for innumerable cartoons, but notably for such characters as Fox (Frank Tashlin's "Fox & Crow" series), Ludwig Von Drake (numerous educational shorts by Walt Disney Productions), Boris Badenov (Jay Ward's "Rocky and His Friends" (1959)), Inspector Fenwick (Ward's "The Dudley Do-Right Show" (1969)), Morocco Mole (Hanna-Barbera's "The Secret Squirrel Show" (1965)), Barney Bear (title character from an MGM series of shorts), and was the original voice of the Pillsbury Doughboy.

He attended the Chouinard Art Institute under the G.I. Bill. His first wife's failing health forced him to drop out and return to radio work.

He is the "Ghost Host" or narrator on the Haunted Mansion Attraction at Disneyland.



His early radio career was cut short when he was drafted into World War II. He was at Normandy on D-Day. He was wounded in action and was returned to the United States for a year of recuperation.

In the early 1970s, he was reportedly making $50,000 a year just for doing the voice work for the Pillsbury Doughboy.

Is heard as at least four different voices in Spartacus (1960), including the guard that Kirk Douglas hamstrung in the opening sequence.

It was common for voice artists to do multiple roles when dubbing foreign language films into English. There are a number of examples where he also did multiple roles when replacing the dialog in Hollywood films.

Provides multiple voices in Flight from Ashiya (1964), getting into three- and four-way conversations with himself.

Was often called upon in the 50s and 60s to "re-loop" the dialogue of other actors, often to correct for foreign accents, complete lack of English proficiency, or poor line readings by unprofessionals. These dubs extended from a lines to entire roles.

Was one of Stan Freberg's cast of performers, most notably as the narrator on "Stan Freberg Presents The United States of America, Vol. 1".


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