Classic Movie Hub (CMH)


Loretta Young kept it a secret that she was three months pregnant with her daughter Judy Lewis during the shoot.

A Paramount prop man, Daniel Ulrich, had his right leg crushed by the 35-ton siege tower used in the battle of Acre.

Although Cecil B. DeMille states in his autobiography that the film failed to be a financial success when released, it was listed as the box-office champion of 1935 in the 1936-37 issue of the Motion Picture Almanac.

Director Cecil B. DeMille used the same sets from The Lives of a Bengal Lancer in this film.

One of over 700 Paramount productions, filmed between 1929 and 1949, which were sold to MCA/Universal in 1958 for television distribution, and have been owned and controlled by MCA ever since.



Stuntman Jack Montgomery, who played a Christian cavalryman in the film, recalled in an interview the tension that existed between director Cecil B. DeMille and the dozens of stuntmen hired to do the battle scenes. The stuntmen resented what they saw as DeMille's cavalier attitude about safety, especially as several stuntmen had been injured, and several horses had been killed, because of what the stuntmen perceived as DeMille's indifference. At one point DeMille was standing on the parapets of the castle, yelling through his megaphone at the "combatants" gathered below. One of them, who had been hired for his expertise at archery, finally tired of DeMille's screaming at them, notched an arrow into his bow and fired it at DeMille's megaphone, the arrow embedding itself into the megaphone just inches from DeMille's head. DeMille quickly left the set and didn't come back for the rest of the day. For the rest of the picture, he never yelled at the stuntmen again.


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