“The Gag Man: Clyde Bruckman and the Birth of Film Comedy” Book Giveaway (via Twitter November 2 through November 28)

“The Gag Man: Clyde Bruckman and the Birth of Film Comedy”
Qualifying Entry Task for TWITTER Book Giveaway Contest

I am happy to say that CMH will be giving away FOUR copies of The Gag Man: Clyde Bruckman and the Birth of Film Comedy by Matthew Dessem, via TWITTER this month, courtesy of The Critical Press. We’ll also be giving away TWO MORE copies of the book via Facebook and this Blog this month as well, so please stay tuned for those details which will be posted here on this blog on Wednesday…

Clyde Bruckman

And, now for the Twitter contest details…

In order to qualify to win a copy of The Gag Man: Clyde Bruckman and the Birth of Film Comedy via this Twitter contest giveaway, you must complete the following task by Saturday, November 28 at 8PM EST. However, the sooner you enter, the better chances you have of winning, because we will pick a winner on four different days within the contest period, via random drawings, as listed below… So if you don’t win the first week that you enter, you will still be eligible to win during the following weeks until the contest is over.

  • Saturday, November 7: One Winner
  • Saturday, November 14: One Winner
  • Saturday, November 21: One Winner
  • Saturday, November 28: One Winner

We will announce the winner(s) on Twitter, the day after each winner is picked at 8PM EST (for example, we will announce the first winner on Sunday November 8 at 8PM EST on Twitter). If you’re also on Facebook and want more chances to win, visit us at Classic Movie Hub on Facebook for additional book giveaways — because, as I mentioned above, we’ll be giving away TWO books there as well!

Clyde Bruckman: The Gag Man

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ENTRY TASK (2-parts) to be completed by Saturday, November 28 at 8PM EST — BUT remember, the sooner you enter, the more chances you have to win…

1) Answer the below question via the comment section at the bottom of this blog post

2) Then TWEET (not DM) the following message:
Just entered to win “The Gag Man: Clyde Bruckman and the Birth of Film Comedy” courtesy of @ClassicMovieHub & @criticalpress #BookGiveaway

THE QUESTION:
Who is one of your favorite early-film comedy stars and why? 

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About the Book:  Though today he is barely remembered, Clyde Bruckman was a key figure in early film comedy, collaborating with icons like Buster Keaton, Harold Lloyd, W.C. Fields, Laurel & Hardy, and the Three Stooges. Working while screenwriting was still in its infancy, Bruckman helped shape many influential shorts and films, developed the gags that made them legendary, and eventually became a director himself. But Bruckman’s own life was filled with tragedy and disappointment, from alcoholism to accusations of plagiarism, and over time his story has been relegated to little more than a footnote. Matthew Dessem’s The Gag Man is the first book-length biography of this fascinating but elusive figure. Drawing on archives, court documents, and of course the films themselves, Dessem brings Bruckman’s story to life and shines a light on an important corner of Hollywood history.

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Please note that Continental United States (excluding Alaska, Hawaii, and the territory of Puerto Rico) and Canada entrants are eligible.

And — BlogHub members ARE eligible to win if they live within the Continental United States or Canada (as noted above).

See complete contest rules here.

For more info, follow @criticalpress  on twitter.

And if you can’t wait to win the book, you can purchase it on amazon via the below link (click on image):

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–Annmarie Gatti for Classic Movie Hub

This entry was posted in Books, Contests & Giveaways, Posts by Annmarie Gatti and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

16 Responses to “The Gag Man: Clyde Bruckman and the Birth of Film Comedy” Book Giveaway (via Twitter November 2 through November 28)

  1. Carl says:

    Two of my favorite old-time stars are Chaplin and Lloyd. I love how they made difficult and dangerous physical comedy seem so effortless. Great talents, both or them.

  2. Chris Teel says:

    I’m a huge Laurel & Hardy fan, I used to watch them with my Dad on public television, I don’t know why they aren’t shown there anymore, but for an individual I’d have to go with W.C. Fields. I can laugh at him no matter what I have going on.

  3. I adore so many silent film stars, but Buster Keaton is one of my favorites. The fact that he did all of his own stunts and trained others to do so is astounding. Lucille Ball comes to mind as one of his mentees. It’s so sad that MGM didn’t really use him to his full potential. Regardless, he remains a silent comedy pioneer.

  4. Amy Condit says:

    My favorite early era comedians have to be Laurel and Hardy. Unlike some of the other brilliant comedians from the silent era, Laurel and Hardy managed to successfully bridge the transition from silent films to talkies. Through the talents of Hal Roach, director Leo McCarey, and Laurel and Hardy (behind the camera and before it), the gags viewed on the screen were simple but brilliant. Laurel and Hardy did not necessarily invent anything “new” that had not been already used by comedians before them. They explicitly telegraphed the joke to the audience at the perfect pace/tempo. Using simple jokes as stepping on a banana peel or tack, throwing pies, and crashing cars, Laurel and Hardy’s struggles through their reality were identifiable to audience members. The exquisite sense of timing, Hardy’s breaking of the fourth wall by looking directly into the camera with great exasperation as if to say, “See what I’m up against?”, and Laurel’s characterization of the dumb, but dignified seemingly helpless failure all add up to great comedy.

  5. Dizzle729 says:

    Buster Keaton is a guy who power has seemed to fade over time but who’s mark is undeniable. His influence is still seen today and those close to film can identify that. Chaplin will always be king but Keaton is an important figure as well.

  6. Christina Sharpe says:

    One of my most favourite early comedy stars is Harold Lloyd. His daring stunts and physicality are hilarious and legendary. Safety Last is a great example of that. His facial expressions were everything. He never fails to make me laugh every time I watch one of his films. Plus, he wore glasses, like me, so that makes me like him even more.

  7. Christina Sharpe says:

    One of my most favourite early comedy stars is Harold Lloyd. His daring stunts and physicality are hilarious and legendary. Safety Last is a great example of that. His facial expressions were everything. He never fails to make me laugh every time I watch one of his films. Plus, he wore glasses, like me, so that makes me like him even more.

  8. One of my all-time favorite silent film comedians was Buster Keaton. He was not only a great comic, he was also one of the world’s finest stuntmen. His stunts were so unbelievably good as to inspire Jackie Chan, an actor who uses his physicality just like Buster. Buster’s stunts were so dangerous that many of the film crew couldn’t watch them. Buster starred in many films but two of my favorites are “The General” and “Our Hospitality”. Buster was truly one of silent films outstanding comedic actors of his time.

  9. Liz says:

    I would say that it would have to be Colleen Moore. She was such a talented comedy actress and completely enjoyable to watch. Her energy is amazing!

  10. Liz says:

    Did my comment go through?

  11. I know he has been mentioned by numerous other people, but buster Keaton is one of the great geniuses of all time. Online from story construction through acting, production through room casting, his films are unique and wonderful

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