Classic Movie Hub (CMH)
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The Godfather: Part III (1990, Francis Ford Coppola), the director’s cut

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Apr 23, 2019

Here’s an all-encompassing theory to explain The Godfather Part III, based only on on-screen evidence (i.e. ignoring production woes, casting woes, rewrites, budget and schedule comprises, and whatever else). Francis Ford Coppola and Mario Puzo hate everyone in the film and everyone who will ever read more

The Predator (2018, Shane Black)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Apr 21, 2019

The Predator has a really short present action, which is both good and bad. Good because one wouldn’t want to see screenwriters Fred Dekker and director Black try for longer, bad because… well, it gets pretty dumb how fast things move along. Dekker and Black don’t do a good job with the expository read more

Sum Up | 3’6″

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Apr 19, 2019

“From thy wedding with the creature who touches heaven, lady God preserve thee.” Most film blogathons are actor, actress, director, sub-genre themed. If you’re trying to branch out, if you just haven’t had a chance to write about something you love yet, they’re efficient opportunities for read more

Stalag 17 (1953, Billy Wilder)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Apr 17, 2019

Stalag 17 opens with narration explaining the film isn’t going to be like those other WWII pictures, where the soldiers are superhuman and the film bleeds patriotism. No, Stalag 17 is going to be something different—first off, it takes place not on the battlefield, but a German prison camp. Through read more

Michael vs. Jason: Evil Emerges (2019, Luke Pedder)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Apr 15, 2019

I make this statement with absolute sincerity: a Michael vs. Jason fan movie is a good idea. It doesn’t need actual acting, because neither of the slasher villains are going to be speaking or emoting. Their shapes and the filmmaking are going to do the work. You could do it on zero budget, you just read more

Moonfleet (1955, Fritz Lang)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Apr 13, 2019

Moonfleet is a very strange film. The protagonist is ten year-old Jon Whiteley; the film starts with him arriving in the coastal village, Moonfleet. It’s the mid-eighteenth century. Moonfleet is a dangerous, scary place. Sort of. Whiteley is in town on his own because his mother has died (Dad is a read more

Born in East L.A. (1987, Cheech Marin)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Apr 11, 2019

Born in East L.A. is a much lighter comedy than expected. Maybe not more than writer-director-star Cheech Marin portends—and a lot of the film’s ineffectiveness isn’t first time feature director Marin’s fault, he needed one of his four editors to have some clue about creating narrative continuity. read more

Lured (1947, Douglas Sirk)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Apr 9, 2019

If Lured had gone just a little bit differently, it could’ve kicked off a franchise for Lucille Ball and George Sanders. He’s the high society snob, she’s the New York girl in London, they solve mysteries. But Lured isn’t their detective story; it’s Charles Coburn’s detective story, they’re read more

The Ten Commandments (1956, Cecil B. DeMille)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Apr 7, 2019

While Yul Brynner easily gives the best performance in Ten Commandments, until the second half of the movie Anne Baxter gives the most amusing one. She's an Egyptian princess and she's going to marry the next pharaoh. The next pharaoh is either Brynner or Charlton Heston. Cedric Hardwicke read more

The Scapegoat (1959, Robert Hamer)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Apr 5, 2019

Despite Bette Davis playing a French dowager countess, The Scapegoat always feels very British. It’s probably exaggerated a little because it takes place in France, features mostly British people (save American Irene Worth) playing French people. Nicole Maurey is the only actual French person in th read more

Storm Warning (1951, Stuart Heisler)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Apr 3, 2019

One of Storm Warning’s failings is its attempt to carefully navigate the story content so I’m just going to be lead-footed and get right to things, which probably would’ve helped the movie though not the ending. Storm Warning is about Ginger Rogers visiting sister Doris Day and witnessing the read more

The Good Earth (1937, Sidney Franklin)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Apr 1, 2019

For maybe the first ninety minutes of The Good Earth, it seems like the most interesting thing to talk about is going to be how the filmmakers were able to make the lead characters in the film appear sympathetic while they were being, frankly, un-American. It makes sense, since the main characters read more

The Emperor’s Candlesticks (1937, George Fitzmaurice)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Mar 30, 2019

The Emperor’s Candlesticks starts with an exceptional display of chemistry from Robert Young and Maureen O’Sullivan. They’re at the opera, it’s the late nineteenth century, it’s a masked costume ball, Young is a Grand Duke dressed as Romeo, and O’Sullivan is the sun. Then it turns out O’Sullivan read more

The Maltese Falcon (1931, Roy Del Ruth)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Mar 28, 2019

Not to be too obvious, but I really wasn’t expecting a twist ending for The Maltese Falcon. But only because I’ve… read the book, seen the 1941 version, seen spoofs of it; I sort of figured I’d be able to guess the plot turns. And I did, right up until the end, when Falcon shows its been doing read more

Hostages (1943, Frank Tuttle)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Mar 26, 2019

At one point during Hostages, I thought there might actually be a good performance in it somewhere. Czech freedom fighter Katina Paxinou faces off with her mother over her Resistance work. It has the potential for a good moment, turns out it’s just an adequate one (amid the sea of inadequate ones read more

The Toy Wife (1938, Richard Thorpe)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Mar 24, 2019

The only impressive thing about The Toy Wife (not good, not admirable) is the film’s ability to keep going professionally, no matter how stupid it gets. There are no easy outs in the picture; even when people start dying off to up the tragedy, there’s still a seemingly endless amount of run time read more

Young Couples Only (1955, Richard Irving)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Mar 22, 2019

Young Couples Only is really good. Especially when you consider how Bill Williams is so weak in the lead and how director Irving never does anything special. He never does anything bad, he just doesn’t do anything special. He certainly doesn’t keep Williams in line. It’s probably read more

Dramatic School (1938, Robert B. Sinclair)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Mar 20, 2019

Given Dramatic School is all about top-billed Luise Rainer’s rise of stage stardom, it might help if she were actually the protagonist of the story, instead of its—occasional—subject. Because Rainer’s got to share the film with a bunch of other characters, none particularly interesting. There’s read more

Patterns of Evidence: The Moses Controversy (2019, Tim Mahoney)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Mar 18, 2019

When I decided to write about Patterns of Evidence: The Moses Controversy, it was because I wanted to make the wee dick move of putting it in Stop Button’s rarely used “Cult” category. Thought it’d be funny. Controversy, which never suggests it’ll be anything but writer-director-star Mahoney read more

Hard Surfaces (2017, Zach Brown)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Mar 16, 2019

Hard Surfaces is pretty thin. Sometimes it’s translucently thin. The film itself never has any depth, but fairly regularly the actors at least show they could give it some depth, if it weren’t for the thinness. Ostensibly the film’s well-meaning, but that quality comes off as fake. Like writer read more
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