Classic Movie Hub (CMH)
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Tea Party (1965, Charles Jarrott)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Oct 21, 2019

Tea Party opens with Vivien Merchant getting a job at a toilet bowl company. The second or third shot of Party is a toilet on display. Strikingly weird without the context; director Jarrott and editor Raoul Sobel are enthusiastic about the visual possibilities without really being any good at them. read more

The Farm (1938, Humphrey Jennings)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Oct 19, 2019

For some reason, The Farm completely ditches what had been a very good sense of humor for the last minute or two. It runs twelve minutes. Losing the humor’s kind of rough, especially since there’s nothing to replace it, just the end of the short. It’s like Farm starts winding down too soon, never read more

The Watcher (2000, Joe Charbanic)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Oct 17, 2019

I do not regret watching The Watcher, which features Keanu Reeves as a serial killer who sees the world like a shitty late nineties video camera. It might not even be a video camera. The shots might just be through a shitty video viewfinder. There’s a lot of… competency on display in the film, but read more

Night Hunter (2018, David Raymond)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Oct 15, 2019

The first act of Night Hunter, which is just as stupid as the film’s original title, Nomis, but has nothing to do with the movie itself—unless Night Hunter refers to “lead” Henry Cavill, who at one point tells his daughter, played by Emma Tremblay, how he was a great SWAT cop until she was born. read more

Parasite (2019, Bong Joon-ho)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Oct 13, 2019

Metaphor is a luxury item in Parasite. First act lead Choi Woo-sik excitedly talks about the metaphorical when things are still going well. Choi, a floundering, unemployed early twenty-something from an unemployed floundering family, lucks into the perfect gig—tutoring a rich teenager with her Engl read more

Adam’s Rib (1949, George Cukor)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Oct 11, 2019

Adam’s Rib has a great script (by Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin), but outside director Cukor not being as energetic as he could be—he might’ve been able to compensate—the script is the biggest problem with the film. There are the really obvious problems, like when Spencer Tracy gets reduced to read more

Peter’s To-Do List (2019, Jon Watts)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Oct 10, 2019

Peter's To-Do List is some next level lazy. It’s an “all-new” short film included on the Spider-Man: Far From Home home video releases. It’s actually just a montage mostly cut from the movie; better yet, the footage also appears in the deleted scenes section of the disc. There are no opening read more

The Most Insane Amusement Park Ever (2013, Mark Robertson)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Oct 8, 2019

The Most Insane Amusement Park Ever is about a New Jersey amusement park called Action Park, which opened in the late seventies and ran for twenty dangerous years—there were apparently six deaths and countless injuries (enabled by the owner running some kind of insurance scheme). The video has a mi read more

The Bells of Cockaigne (1953, James Sheldon)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Oct 6, 2019

The Bells at Cockaigne plays it very safe. It’s an inspirational “play for television” about lovable old Irishman in the U.S. Gene Lockhart daydreaming about winning an apparently still legal in 1953 numbers racket the newspapers run. Lockhart’s going to use the money to go home to Ireland and read more

Mondays in the Sun (2002, Fernando León de Aranoa)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Oct 4, 2019

At some point, around the halfway point but maybe a little earlier, Mondays in the Sun becomes an endurance spectacle—can director de Aranoa (who co-wrote with Ignacio del Moral) actually keep the film lyrical. There are softly epical arcs in the film, but they get resolved gradually (or not at all read more

I Died a Thousand Times (1955, Stuart Heisler)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Oct 2, 2019

Going into the third act of I Died a Thousand Times, the film is in great shape. It’s got a strange pace but it’s all working out, mostly thanks to lead Jack Palance’s peculiar and strong performance, and it doesn’t seem like it could do anything wrong enough to screw things up. Unfortunately, read more

Free Solo (2018, Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi and Jimmy Chin)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Oct 1, 2019

Free Solo is ostensibly about rock climber Alex Honnold’s obsession to free solo (climbing alone without ropes, maybe falling to a gruesome death) Yosemite’s El Capitan mountain. You know, from Star Trek V. Does Honnold beat Captain Kirk’s time? You could watch and find out. Or Google. Only it’s read more

The Gangster, the Cop, the Devil (2019, Lee Won-tae)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Sep 29, 2019

According to the opening titles, The Gangster, The Cop, The Devil is based on a true story, which is—I assume—why it takes place in 2005. The story, about a cop (Kim Mu-yeol) and his least favorite gangster (Ma Dong-seok) teaming up to take down a serial killer, comes off like a seventies update read more

Chimes at Midnight (1965, Orson Welles)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Sep 27, 2019

Chimes at Midnight opens with Orson Welles and Alan Webb, both aged men in the Medieval Ages, bumbling (probably at least somewhat drunkenly) in for the night; they sit at a fire and gently reminisce about their youth. The scene gives a first look at screenwriter, director, star Welles in all his g read more

Alien: Containment (2019, Chris Reading)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Sep 25, 2019

For the first few minutes—say, three of the short’s nine minute runtime—it seems like Alien: Containment is going to work out. The acting is good. Gaia Weiss is a fine lead, Theo Barklem-Biggs is an okay freaking out guy (he’s in an Alien movie, someone’s got to freak out), but Sharon Duncan-Brewst read more

Downton Abbey (2019, Michael Engler)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Sep 23, 2019

I’m trying to decide if Downton Abbey is wholly incomprehensible to someone who didn’t watch the television show, or if they’d appreciate it. Julian Fellowes’s screenplay is very tidy, no loose strings, always the right mix between A, B, and C plots, so one can at least appreciate the pacing read more

Rambo: Last Blood (2019, Adrian Grunberg)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Sep 22, 2019

Sitting and reflecting on Rambo: Last Blood and the franchise’s thirty-seven year legacy, the best idea of the fixing the film is probably just to have Sylvester Stallone do a bunch of shots training horses. He seems really good with them. And he doesn’t seem really good at anything in Last Blood. read more

Logan’s Run (1976, Michael Anderson)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Sep 21, 2019

I wouldn’t say everyone does their best in Logan’s Run, but everyone does try. Farrah Fawcett does try in her scenes. You can see she’s trying. And for some reason director Anderson wants to make it painfully clear no matter how hard she tries, Fawcett’s going to be terrible. But at least Fawcett’s read more

Alien: Alone (2019, Noah Miller)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Sep 19, 2019

Alien: Alone is one in a series of six “fan-made” but presumably Fox-funded Alien short films for the fortieth anniversary. Based on Alone, it doesn’t seem like Fox had a very high bar when it came to project proposals. Or at least they didn’t care how the shorts turned out, so long as the hook read more

Battle at Big Rock (2019, Colin Trevorrow)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Sep 17, 2019

Battle at Big Rock is a reminder the Jurassic Park Franchise Part 2 isn’t over yet. It’s a suspenseful nine minutes where director Trevorrow puts the preserving lead characters in danger—a family, of course—culminating in an allosaurus about to eat a baby. There’s also the precocious kid Melody read more
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