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Day 9 of Noirvember: Al Roberts in Detour (1945)

Shadows and Satin Posted by shadowsandsatin on Nov 9, 2021

Today’s Noirvember post shines the spotlight on one unlucky dude – Al Roberts in Detour (1945). WHAT’S DETOUR ABOUT? New York piano player Al Roberts (Tom Neal) hitch-hikes his way across the country to reunite with his singer-girlfriend, who made the trek to the Golden State to try her hand at read more

YouTube Noir — Noirvember Day 5: Detour (1945)

Shadows and Satin Posted by shadowsandsatin on Nov 5, 2020

If you’ve never seen Detour (1945), you’re in for a down and dirty, noirishly good treat. I envy you. Detour is one of those “B” noirs you may have heard about, with a budget so low that the director, Edgar Ulmer, used his own car for filming. But it doesn’t feel cheap, and it packs a noir read more

Day Thirteen of Noirvember: Savage Detour

Shadows and Satin Posted by shadowsandsatin on Nov 13, 2018

Detour (1945) is 68 minutes of cracking good lines, an edge-of-your-seat plot, and a perfect noir ending. And then there’s Ann Savage. In the film, Savage plays Vera, a hitch-hiker picked up on the side of the road by Al Roberts (Tom Neal), who’s on his way from New York to California to meet up read more

Detour (1945): Noir’s unlikely masterpiece

The Old Hollywood Garden Posted by Carol Martinheira on Nov 4, 2018

Detour (1945): Noir’s unlikely masterpiece On November 4, 2018 By CarolIn Uncategorized About eight years ago, I watched Detour (1945) for the very first time. I was in the early stages of my film buff-ness, and I wanted to consume as many movies read more

Detour (1945)

4 Star Films Posted by 4 Star Film Fan on Dec 15, 2015

Hollywood is really missing out, because with the direction that the industry has gone there really is no space for a film like Detour to be made by conventional methods anymore. It was shot in less than two weeks. It cost a minuscule amount compared to the contemporary A-Pictures, and yet it used i read more

Detour (1945)

4 Star Films Posted by 4 Star Film Fan on Dec 15, 2015

Hollywood is really missing out, because with the direction that the industry has gone there really is no space for a film like Detour to be made by conventional methods anymore. It was shot in less than two weeks. It cost a minuscule amount compared to the contemporary A-Pictures, and yet it used i read more

The CMBA Blogathon: Detour (or, The Long and Winding Road)

Shadows and Satin Posted by shadowsandsatin on Oct 20, 2015

“You never know what’s in store for you when you hear the squeal of brakes.” That’s Detour (1945). A 67-minute advertisement for why hitchhiking is a bad idea, Detour is one of my favorite guilty pleasures from the classic film noir era. In a nutshell, the film centers on Al Roberts (Tom read more

Detour (1945, Edgar G. Ulmer)

The Stop Button Posted by Andrew Wickliffe on Jul 9, 2014

Detour should be episodic, but it's not. The film chronicles the misadventures of Tom Neal's night club pianist, who's stuck not being good enough for Carnegie Hall and having a fickle fiancée (Claudia Drake) from the outset. When he does decide to follow her out to her dreams in Cal read more

Detour (1945)

Flickers in Time Posted by Beatrice on Jun 27, 2014

Detour Directed by Edgar G. Ulmer Written by Martin Goldsmith 1945/USA Producers Releasing Corporation (PRC) Repeat viewing/Amazon Prime Instant Video #186 of 1001 Movies You Must See Before You Die Vera: Are the girls in Phoenix that bad? This classic shows what a gifted director can do with six read more

Detour (1945)

The Motion Pictures Posted by Lindsey on Feb 21, 2013

(Image: Noir of the Week) Al (Tom Neal) is a talented piano player who is unhappy with his job in a New York nightclub. The job is slightly sweetened by the fact that he performs with a pretty lady named Sue (Claudia Drake), and they’ve fallen in love. When Sue leaves New York in search of Hol read more

Screening Report: THE SEARCHERS (1956); DETOUR (1945); and THE PASSENGER (1975) at IFC Center

Cinematically Insane Posted by Will McKinley on Dec 17, 2012

On Friday, the IFC Center in New York City kicked off a week-long festival of road movies selected by Walter Salles, director of the upcoming adaptation of Jack Kerouac’s ON THE ROAD. I saw three of the iconic films presented this weekend: John Ford’s THE SEARCHERS (1956); Michelangelo read more