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Vincent Sherman Overview:

Director, Vincent Sherman, was born Abraham Orovitz on Jul 16, 1906 in Vienna, GA. Sherman died at the age of 99 on Jun 18, 2006 in Woodland Hills, CA .

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BlogHub Articles:

By Bogart Fan on Mar 6, 2014 From The Bogie Film Blog

Birth Name: Abraham Orovitz Birthdate: July 16, 1906 Number of Films that Made with Humphrey Bogart: 5 The Lowdown Born and raised in Georgia, started his show business career acting on Broadway before making the transition to small parts in Hollywood, and then eve... Read full article


Saturday’s Children (, 1940 – and other versions)

By Judy on Mar 24, 2013 From Movie Classics

This posting is really a follow-up to the excellent John Garfield centenary blogathon. In the last few days I’ve? been lucky enough to see one of Garfield’s rarer films,? Saturday’s Children, and was surprised to realise just how many other versions of the same story have been made... Read full article


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(1949)
Fri. 25 Jan. 10:00 AM EST

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Vincent Sherman Facts
Graduate of Oglethorpe University.

Directed 4 actors to Oscar nominations: Bette Davis (Best Actress, Mr. Skeffington (1944)), Claude Rains (Best Supporting Actor, Mr. Skeffington (1944)), Richard Todd (Best Actor, The Hasty Heart (1949)), and Robert Vaughn (Best Supporting Actor, The Young Philadelphians (1959)).

He had begun as an actor, appearing on Broadway and in a handful of movies, among them the hit Counsellor at Law (1933), in which he had a small but memorable role as a young anarchist opposite John Barrymore. He also wrote several screenplays, including King of the Underworld (1939), which starred Humphrey Bogart. In the late 1940s Warner Bros. hired Sherman under an acting-writing-directing contract, and he was assigned to the studio's B-picture unit, adapting old movies into remakes. He broke out as a director in 1942 with a gripping melodrama The Hard Way (1943). Although he would go on to direct many important projects, he never rose to the level that would afford him consideration for an Academy Award.

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