Stanley Kubrick Overview:

Legendary director, Stanley Kubrick, was born on Jul 26, 1928 in New York City, NY. Kubrick died at the age of 70 on Mar 7, 1999 in Harpenden, Hertfordshire and was laid to rest in Childwickbury Manor Cemetery in Childwick Green, Hertfordshire, England.

HONORS and AWARDS:

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Although Kubrick was nominated for four Oscars, he never won a competitive Academy Award.

Academy Awards

YearAwardFilm nameRoleResult
1964Best DirectorDr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)N/ANominated
1968Best Director2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)N/ANominated
1971Best DirectorA Clockwork Orange (1971)N/ANominated
1971Best WritingA Clockwork Orange (1971)N/ANominated
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BlogHub Articles:

Barry Lyndon (1975, )

on Apr 17, 2020 From The Stop Button

The first half of Barry Lyndon, very nicely delineated on screen with a title card and then an intermission, is a black comedy. The second half is a tragedy. The epilogue explicitly reconciles the two, but there?s also Michael Hordern?s narration, which does the most expository work of anything in t... Read full article


Quote: on Plot

By KC on Jun 24, 2018 From Classic Movies

Image Source A very good plot is a minor miracle; it's like a hit tune in music. - Source... Read full article


Flying Padre (1951, )

By Andrew Wickliffe on Jun 12, 2018 From The Stop Button

Flying Padre has three types of impressive shots. The first two types involve an airplane. The short is about a New Mexico priest who flies around his 4,000-square mile parish. There are interior and exterior shots of the plane and director Kubrick gets some fantastic shots from inside out. He?s als... Read full article


Book Review--Space Odyssey: , Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece

By KC on Apr 20, 2018 From Classic Movies

Space Odyssey: , Arthur C. Clarke, and the Making of a Masterpiece Michael Benson Simon & Schuster, 2018 Upon its release, 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) became a sensation as a sort of Disneyland ride for grown ups. With its innovative, and trippy special effects, it was the perfe... Read full article


2001: A Space Odyssey (1968, )

By Andrew Wickliffe on Apr 13, 2018 From The Stop Button

2001: A Space Odyssey has five distinct parts?the ?Dawn of Man? sequence, then the space station and moon visit, then the main action before the intermission, then the main action after the intermission, then the ?Jupiter? sequence. The prehistoric sequence, where an advanced alien device puts the v... Read full article


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Stanley Kubrick Facts
Abigail Rosen, who co-starred with Viva in Andy Warhol's Tub Girls (1967), was the first door lady at Max's Kansas City, a nightclub in New York City. She claims she had the honor of throwing Kubrick out of the club. "At first Mickey [Ruskin] hired me as the coat-check girl, but it was on the second floor and we were schlepping coats from downstairs to upstairs, and taking them back down where the people wanted to leave. It was not a good plan, besides which people would go up and steal coats. So we abandoned the whole idea and I became the door lady with Bob Russell. The embarrassing times were when Mickey asked us to kick somebody out. The philosophy behind it was that no one would beat on or abuse a woman. I was asked one night to kick Stanley Kubrick out. He was drunk and obnoxious and neither Mickey or I knew who he was. I said, 'Sir, I think it's time for you to leave now, you're not going to be happy here.' And he left. Then Mickey found out the next day who we had kicked out, and he yelled at me for not recognizing him. 'That's why I have you here,' he said, 'you're supposed to know who these people are.'".

In 1969, after the success of 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), Kubrick turned to one of his life-long obsessions into a motion picture screenplay - Napoleon. The script would have required an extremely large budget to be made into a film, and it was all on its way well into pre-production, when the studio suddenly decided to pull the plug after another big-budget biopic on the life of Napoleon, Waterloo (1970/I), failed financially. Kubrick, angry and depressed that his film was canceled, would later in his career (and even in the production of other films) attempt to get the project back on its feet with different companies over the years. The requirements needed would have been to write a completely new screenplay, and Kubrick, feeling he couldn't match the masterpiece that was his original draft, dropped the project.

Ranked #4 in Empire (UK) magazine's "The Greatest directors ever!" [2005]

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