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Roddy McDowall Overview:

Legendary actor, Roddy McDowall, was born Roderick Andrew Anthony Jude McDowall on Sep 17, 1928 in Herne Hill, London. McDowall died at the age of 70 on Oct 3, 1998 in Studio City, CA and was cremated and his ashes scattered at sea.

HONORS and AWARDS:

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He was honored with one star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in the category of Television. McDowall was never nominated for an Academy Award.

BlogHub Articles:

Warner Archive: Produces and Stars In Black Midnight (1949)

By KC on May 13, 2015 From Classic Movies

As a twenty-year-old maturing child star in 1949, must have wondered about his fate. So many actors struggle to successfully make the transition to adult careers. He was at that awkward age when Monogram Studios signed him to a contract, where he would star in and coproduce six films.... Read full article


Mini Tribute:

By Annmarie Gatti on Sep 17, 2012 From Classic Movie Hub Blog

Born September 17, 1928, ! started out as a Child Actor (i.e. How Green Was My Valley, My Friend Flicka, Lassie Come Home), and successfully moved on to some fabulous ‘adult’ roles including Midnight Lace, Inside Daisy Clover, Cleopatra, and of course –... Read full article


Stars & Their Hobbies ~

By Raquel Stecher on Nov 30, -0001 From Out of the Past - A Classic Film Blog

, Home Movies was a trustworthy kind of a guy and he made many close friends in Hollywood. Every Sunday he would have an open house at his Malibu Beach home. This was a time when the Hollywood elite could come over relax and be themselves. They let their guard down whe... Read full article


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Roddy McDowall Quotes:

Octavian: Antony is dead? You say that as if it were a everyday occurrence. The soup is hot, the soup is cold. Antony is alive, Antony is dead.


Vaner: Have you committed a crime?
Captain Alan Thorndike: No.
Vaner: Was it, um, about a woman?
Captain Alan Thorndike: [smiling] I see you know life.
Vaner: I thought so. They're a dickens of a problem, aren't they, sir?


Octavian: Is that how one says it? As simply as that. "Mark Antony is dead. Lord Antony is dead." "The soup is hot; the soup is cold." "Mark Antony is living; Mark Antony is dead." Shake with terror when such words pass your lips, for fear they be untrue and Antony'd cut out your tounge for the lie! And if true, for your lifetime boast that you were honored to speak his name even in death. Dying, of such a man, must be shouted, screamed! It must dare go back from the corners of the universe. "Antony is dead! Mark Antony of Rome lives no more!"


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Roddy McDowall on the
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Roddy McDowall Facts
In 1974 the FBI raided his home and seized his collection of films and TV series during an investigation of copyright infringement and movie piracy. The collection consisted of 160 16mm prints and over 1,000 videocassettes. The value of the films was conservatively assessed at $5,005,426 by representatives of the movie industry. The actor was not charged and agreed to cooperate with the FBI. There was then no aftermarket for films, as the commercial video recorder had not been marketed, and studios routinely destroyed old negatives and prints of classic films they felt had no worth. Film buffs like McDowall had to purchase 16mm prints of films from the studios, or movie prints on the black market, or from other collectors. He claimed that he had once had as many as 337 movies in his collection, but at the time of the investigation he was not sure how many were still in his possession. He had bought Errol Flynn's movie collection, and had acquired other films through purchases or swaps. McDowall told the FBI that he had transferred many of his films to videotape in order to conserve space and because tape was longer-lasting than film, and subsequently had sold or traded the prints, plus other prints of movies he had lost interest in, to other collectors. He said that he collected the films due to his love of the cinema and to help protect t

Both of the series in which he starred were short-lived science fiction series produced in the 1970s: "Planet of the Apes" (1974) and "The Fantastic Journey" (1977).

He appeared in four of the five "Planet of the Apes" films. Having originally played the chimpanzee archaeologist Cornelius in Planet of the Apes (1968), he was unable to reprise his role in Beneath the Planet of the Apes (1970) as he was directing The Devil's Widow (1970) in Britain at the time. In that film, the role was played by David Watson. However, he later returned as Cornelius in Escape from the Planet of the Apes (1971) and as his son Caesar in Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (1972) and Battle for the Planet of the Apes (1973).

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