George Cukor Overview:

Legendary director, George Cukor, was born George Dewey Cukor on Jul 7, 1899 in New York City, NY. Cukor died at the age of 83 on Jan 24, 1983 in Los Angeles, CA and was laid to rest in Forest Lawn (Glendale) Cemetery in Glendale, CA.

MINI BIO:

Despite an obvious predilection (and talent) for extracting the maximum warmth and character from major female stars, George Cukor stubbornly resisted the attempts of many critics to pigeonhole his talent. He created many films with characters one cares about, despite an often artificial setting, and all of his pictures were major studio (mostly MGM) productions.

He worked in the theatre from 1919, initially as stage manager, then as director from 1923. Brought to Hollywood in 1929 more or less as a dialogue director, Cukor's reputation as a 'woman's director' began in 1932 with What Price Hollywood, a scathing look at the film capital with Constance Bennett, and A Bill of Divorcement which introduced Katharine Hepburn. The Cukor/Hepburn association continued to flower in films such as Little Women, Holiday, Adam's Rib, The Philadelphia Story and Pat and Mike. Cukor also extracted above-average performances from Jean Harlow (in Dinner at Eight), Claudette Colbert (in Zaca), Joan Crawford (in a Woman's Face), Ingrid Bergman (in Gaslight), Judy Holliday (in Born Yesterday) and Judy Garland (in A Star is Born).

(Source: available at Amazon Quinlan's Film Directors).

HONORS and AWARDS:

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George Cukor was nominated for five Academy Awards, winning one for Best Director for My Fair Lady in 1964.

Academy Awards

YearAwardFilm nameRoleResult
1932/33Best DirectorLittle Women (1933)N/ANominated
1940Best DirectorThe Philadelphia Story (1940)N/ANominated
1947Best DirectorA Double Life (1947)N/ANominated
1950Best DirectorBorn Yesterday (1950)N/ANominated
1964Best DirectorMy Fair Lady (1964)N/AWon
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He was honored with one star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in the category of Motion Pictures.

BlogHub Articles:

Adam’s Rib (1949, )

By Andrew Wickliffe on Oct 11, 2019 From The Stop Button

Adam?s Rib has a great script (by Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin), but outside director Cukor not being as energetic as he could be?he might?ve been able to compensate?the script is the biggest problem with the film. There are the really obvious problems, like when Spencer Tracy gets reduced to a supp... Read full article


Adam’s Rib (1949, )

By Andrew Wickliffe on Oct 11, 2019 From The Stop Button

Adam?s Rib has a great script (by Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin), but outside director Cukor not being as energetic as he could be?he might?ve been able to compensate?the script is the biggest problem with the film. There are the really obvious problems, like when Spencer Tracy gets reduced to a supp... Read full article


Adam’s Rib (1949, )

on Oct 11, 2019 From The Stop Button

Adam?s Rib has a great script (by Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin), but outside director Cukor not being as energetic as he could be?he might?ve been able to compensate?the script is the biggest problem with the film. There are the really obvious problems, like when Spencer Tracy gets reduced to a supp... Read full article


Adam’s Rib (1949, )

on Oct 11, 2019 From The Stop Button

Adam?s Rib has a great script (by Ruth Gordon and Garson Kanin), but outside director Cukor not being as energetic as he could be?he might?ve been able to compensate?the script is the biggest problem with the film. There are the really obvious problems, like when Spencer Tracy gets reduced to a supp... Read full article


Gaslight (1944, )

By Andrew Wickliffe on Sep 5, 2018 From The Stop Button

At the end of Gaslight, when all has seemingly been revealed, there?s only one question left. If Scotland Yard inspector Joseph Cotten isn?t an American in London, why doesn?t anyone notice his lack of accent. It?s a wise choice not to give Cotten an accent?presumably he couldn?t do one?but it also ... Read full article


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George Cukor Quotes:

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George Cukor on the
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George Cukor Facts
Directed 20 different actors in Oscar-nominated performances: Basil Rathbone, Norma Shearer, Greta Garbo, James Stewart, Katharine Hepburn, Ruth Hussey, Ingrid Bergman, Charles Boyer, Angela Lansbury, Ronald Colman, Deborah Kerr, Judy Holliday, James Mason, Judy Garland, Anthony Quinn, Anna Magnani, Rex Harrison, Stanley Holloway, Gladys Cooper and Maggie Smith. Stewart, Bergman, Colman, Holliday, and Harrison won Oscars for their performances in Cukor's movies.


In 1968, he accepted the Oscar for best actress in a leading role on behalf of Katharine Hepburn, who wasn't present at the ceremony.

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