Clyde Bruckman Overview:

Director, Clyde Bruckman, was born on Sep 20, 1894 in San Bernardino, CA. Bruckman died at the age of 60 on Jan 4, 1955 in Hollywood, CA and was laid to rest in Fairhaven Memorial Park Cemetery in Santa Ana, Orange County, CA.

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?The Gag Man: and the Birth of Film Comedy? Book Giveaway (November via Facebook and Blog)

By Annmarie Gatti on Nov 4, 2015 From Classic Movie Hub Blog

?The Gag Man: and the Birth of Film Comedy? Qualifying?Entry Task for Facebook and Blog Book Giveaway Contest Here we go…this is our Facebook/Blog version of the contest! ?We will be giving away?TWO copies?of?The Gag Man: and the Birth of Film Comedy?by?Matthew De... Read full article


?The Gag Man: and the Birth of Film Comedy? Book Giveaway (via Twitter November 2 through November 28)

By Annmarie Gatti on Nov 2, 2015 From Classic Movie Hub Blog

?The Gag Man: and the Birth of Film Comedy? Qualifying?Entry Task for TWITTER Book Giveaway Contest I am happy to say that CMH will be giving away?FOUR copies?of?The Gag Man: and the Birth of Film Comedy?by?Matthew Dessem,?via TWITTER this month,?courtesy of The Critica... Read full article


The Fatal Glass of Beer (1933, )

on Jun 16, 2011 From The Stop Button

As it turns out–it’s hard to tell from the first ten minutes–The Fatal Glass of Beer is something of a spoof of melodramas. Those first ten minutes though are mostly just W.C. Fields being a gold prospector in a snow storm. There’s very little narrative. Fields introduces one... Read full article


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Clyde Bruckman Facts
Bruckman had been a sportswriter prior to films.

His life could serve as a lesson on the evils of alcohol. In his prime in the 1920s he was inarguably one of the best writers/gag men/directors in the business. His keen sense of comedy allowed him to easily shift between diverse assignments for Buster Keaton (co-directing The General), Laurel & Hardy and Harold Lloyd without missing a beat. But by the early 1930s his chronic alcoholism made him unreliable. He'd go on benders during a production and fail to show up on sets. Harold Lloyd attempted to keep him in the business during the 1930s, graciously giving him directorial credit on Feet First (1930) and Movie Crazy (1932) despite his questionable input into these productions. His behavior finally made him all but unemployable in Hollywood and ironically in his last paying studio job he contributed gags to a Joan Davis comedy, She Gets Her Man (Universal, 1945) that resulted in Lloyd successfully suing him for appropriation of his property. In desperation, Bruckman had lifted material from Movie Crazy and the lawsuit resulted in Bruckman being blackballed. He managed scant intermittent work in live TV in Los Angeles with Keaton, but he grew increasingly despondent and destitute. He committed suicide in 1955 in a phone booth on Santa Monica Boulevard with a handgun he'd borrowed from Keaton.

In 1930, he lived at 717 N. Elm Drive in Beverly Hills.

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